Ban on Muslim immigration

Sep 21, 2016

Q. Would you support or oppose a ban on Muslim immigration to Australia?

  Total Vote Labor Vote LNP Vote Greens Vote other
Total support 49% 40% 60% 34% 58%
Total oppose 40% 48% 31% 59% 35%
Strongly support 28% 20% 36% 13% 41%
Support 21% 20% 24% 21% 17%
Oppose 19% 18% 21% 16% 18%
Strongly oppose 21% 30% 10% 43% 17%
Don’t know 11% 13% 8% 8% 6%

 

  Total Men Women Aged 18-24 Aged 25-34 Aged 35-44 Aged 45-54 Aged 55-64 Aged 65+
Total support 49% 48% 49% 28% 44% 48% 60% 47% 60%
Total oppose 40% 41% 40% 58% 42% 38% 32% 42% 33%
Strongly support 28% 27% 28% 14% 26% 29% 35% 24% 32%
Support 21% 21% 21% 14% 18% 19% 25% 23% 28%
Oppose 19% 20% 19% 25% 20% 17% 15% 18% 21%
Strongly oppose 21% 21% 21% 33% 22% 21% 17% 24% 12%
Don’t know 11% 11% 11% 14% 13% 14% 8% 11% 8%

 

Reasons for supporting ban

Sep 21, 2016

Q. What is the main reason you support a ban on Muslim immigration? (If support or strongly support)

  Total Vote Labor Vote LNP
They do not integrate into Australian society 41% 39% 39%
Terrorist threat 27% 32% 32%
They do not share our values 22% 17% 22%
Australia is a Christian country 4% 1% 7%
None of these 4% 9%
Don’t know 2% 2%

 

Statements about Pauline Hanson

Sep 21, 2016

Q. Do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

  Total agree Total disagree   Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
I might not personally agree with everything she says but she is speaking for a lot of ordinary Australians 62% 30%   26% 36% 12% 18% 8%
Paul Hanson’s election to the Senate is a backward step for Australian democracy 38% 48%   21% 17% 28% 20% 13%
I agree with a lot of what Pauline Hanson says and it’s good to see her back in Parliament 42% 45%   16% 26% 18% 27% 12%
Pauline Hanson talks about issues other politicians too scared to tackle 65% 28%   29% 36% 12% 14% 9%
Pauline Hanson’s views do not reflect Australian values and she should not be given so much media coverage 45% 44%   23% 22% 25% 19% 11%
Given the rising number terrorist incidents around world there should be a national debate on Pauline Hanson’s call to ban Muslim immigration 48% 36% 18% 30% 17% 19% 15%
I might not personally agree with everything she says but she is speaking for a lot of ordinary Australians 62% 30%   57% 36% 71% 27% 39% 53%
Paul Hanson’s election to the Senate is a backward step for Australian democracy 38% 48%   43% 45% 38% 53% 68% 24%
I agree with a lot of what Pauline Hanson says and it’s good to see her back in Parliament 42% 45%   40% 50% 49% 42% 18% 72%
Pauline Hanson talks about issues other politicians too scared to tackle 65% 28%   59% 33% 76% 19% 42% 48%
Pauline Hanson’s views do not reflect Australian values and she should not be given so much media coverage 45% 44%   46% 42% 44% 50% 73% 17%
Given the rising number terrorist incidents around world there should be a national debate on Pauline Hanson’s call to ban Muslim immigration 48% 36% 46% 39% 56% 33% 28% 57%

 

Federal voting intention

Sep 20, 2016

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   Last week

13/9/16

2 weeks ago

6/9/16

4 weeks ago

23/8/16

  Election  2 Jul 16
Liberal 34%   35% 36% 36%    
National 3%   3% 3% 3%    
Total Liberal/National 37%   38% 39% 39%   42.0%
Labor 37%   37% 37% 36%   34.7%
Greens 10%   10% 10% 10%   10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 4%   4% 3% 4%    
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 6%   5% 5%      
Other/Independent 7%   7% 6% 12%   13.1%
2 party preferred              
Liberal National 48%   48% 48% 49%   50.4%
Labor 52%   52% 52% 51%   49.6%

NB. Sample = 1,830. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

National vote on same-sex marriage

Sep 20, 2016

Q. The Federal Government intends to hold a national vote on same sex marriage in February next year. If the question was “Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?” how would you vote?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+   Aug 2016
Yes 60%   70% 55% 88% 47%   55% 65% 72% 58% 50%   57%
No 30%   22% 37% 5% 46%   36% 24% 20% 31% 40%   28%
Don’t know 10%   8% 7% 7% 7%   9% 11% 8% 11% 10%   15%

60% would vote “yes” in a plebiscite on same-sex marriage and 30% would vote “no”. 10% did not know how they would vote – down 5% since August.

Those most likely to vote “yes” were Greens voters (88%), Labor voters (70%) and voters aged 18-34 (72%).

50% of those aged 65+ would vote “no”.

Funding campaigns

Sep 20, 2016

Q. As part of the national plebiscite on same-sex marriage, the Government has decided that tax-payer funding of $7.5 million be provided for advertising for both the in favour and against campaigns. Do you approve or disapprove of the Government providing funding for campaign costs in the lead-up to the vote?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Vote yes Vote no
Total approve 22%   22% 29% 16% 25%   24% 22%
Total disapprove 68%   67% 62% 83% 72%   67% 73%
Strongly approve 6%   8% 8% 4% 4%   8% 5%
Approve 16%   14% 21% 12% 21%   16% 17%
Disapprove 22%   23% 25% 17% 20%   21% 21%
Strongly disapprove 46%   44% 37% 66% 52%   46% 52%
Don’t know 10%   11% 8% 1% 3%   9% 5%

68% disapprove of the Government’s proposal to provide funding to both sides of the same-sex marriage campaigns and 22% approve. More than 60% of all voter groups disapprove.

Those who would vote no to same sex marriage in a national vote were a little more likely to oppose Government funding of the campaigns (73% disapprove).

Concern about campaign

Sep 20, 2016

Q. How concerned are you that a holding a plebiscite on same-sex marriage may result in “hate speech” and abuse of gay and lesbian communities?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Vote yes Vote no
Total concerned 48%   59% 41% 81% 47%   64% 25%
Total not concerned 39%   28% 52% 18% 46%   26% 64%
Very concerned 22%   28% 13% 59% 15%   31% 9%
Somewhat concerned 26%   31% 27% 22% 32%   33% 16%
Not very concerned 19%   17% 24% 7% 18%   17% 20%
Not at all concerned 20%   11% 28% 11% 28%   9% 44%
Don’t know 12%   14% 9% 2% 6%   9% 11%

48% say they are concerned that a holding a plebiscite on same-sex marriage may result in “hate speech” and abuse of gay and lesbian communities and 39% are not concerned.

Those more likely to be concerned were Labor voters (59%), Greens voters (81%) and aged 18-24 (70%).

64% of those who would vote yes to same sex marriage in a national vote were concerned about “hate speech” compared to 25% of those who would vote no

Vote in Parliament

Sep 20, 2016

Q. If the legislation required to conduct a same-sex marriage plebiscite is blocked by the Senate, should there be a vote in Parliament on same-sex marriage?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Vote yes Vote no
Should be a vote in Parliament 53%   60% 46% 82% 53%   74% 22%
Should not be a vote in Parliament 29%   23% 38% 11% 32%   14% 61%
Don’t know 18%   17% 16% 7% 14%   13% 17%

53% agree that if the legislation required to conduct a same-sex marriage plebiscite is blocked by the Senate, should there be a vote in Parliament on same-sex marriage and 29% think there should not be a vote.

Those most likely to favour a vote were Labor voters (60%), Greens voters (82%) and aged 18-24 (61%).

74% of those who would vote yes to same sex marriage in a national vote think there should be a vote in Parliament if the plebiscite is blocked by the Senate and 61% of those who would vote no think their should not be a vote in Parliament.

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