Federal politics – voting intention

Jun 30, 2015

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,816 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election 7 Sep 13

4 weeks ago 2/6/15

2 weeks ago 16/6/15

Last week 23/6/15

This week 30/6/15

Liberal

38%

39%

38%

38%

National

4%

3%

3%

3%

Total Liberal/National

45.6%

41%

42%

41%

41%

Labor

33.4%

40%

39%

39%

39%

Greens

8.6%

10%

10%

10%

11%

Palmer United Party

5.5%

1%

1%

1%

1%

Other/Independent

6.9%

8%

8%

8%

8%

2 Party Preferred

Election 7 Sep 13

4 weeks ago 2/6/15

2 weeks ago 16/6/15

Last week 23/6/15

This week 30/6/15

Liberal National

53.5%

48%

48%

48%

47%

Labor

46.5%

52%

52%

52%

53%

NB. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2013 election.

Funding schools

Jun 30, 2015

Q. The Federal Government has released a paper which lists several ideas for future funding of schools. Do you approve or disapprove of each of the following ideas?

Total approve

Total dis- approve

Strongly approve

Approve

Dis- approve

Strongly dis- approve

Don’t know

Giving the states and territories full responsibility for all schools

38%

35%

9%

29%

24%

11%

27%

Making states and territories fully responsible for funding public schools while the Federal Government funds non-government schools

20%

56%

4%

16%

27%

29%

25%

Reducing Commonwealth involvement in schools, but without significant structural change

28%

43%

4%

24%

28%

15%

30%

Making the Federal Government the main funder of all schools.

51%

23%

15%

36%

17%

6%

25%

Means testing – charging high-income parents fees for children to attend public schools.

37%

48%

10%

27%

23%

25%

14%

A majority of respondents (51%) approve of the proposal of “Making the Federal Government the main funder of all schools” and a majority (56%) reject the proposal of “Making states and territories fully responsible for funding public schools while the Federal Government funds non- government schools”.

They were more likely to reject the proposal to means test parents of public schools (37% approve/48% disapprove) but were divided on the issue of “Giving the states and territories full responsibility for all schools” (38% approve/35% disapprove).

Troops in Iraq

Jun 30, 2015

Q. Australia currently has troops in Iraq to help train Iraqi forces fighting Islamic State militants. Would you support or oppose Australian soldiers being used to fight Islamic State, not just train Iraqi forces?

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Total support

41%

37%

51%

29%

35%

Total oppose

43%

48%

38%

53%

52%

Strongly support

15%

12%

22%

7%

15%

Support

26%

25%

29%

22%

20%

Oppose

23%

23%

25%

22%

18%

Strongly oppose

20%

25%

13%

31%

34%

Don’t know

17%

14%

12%

18%

12%

41% support Australian soldiers being used to fight Islamic State and 43% oppose.

A majority (51%) of Liberal/National voters support while Greens voters (53%) and Labor voters (48%) were more likely to oppose.

Trust in newspapers

Jun 30, 2015

Q. How much trust do you have in what you read in the following newspapers?

Total a lot/some

A lot of trust

Some trust

Not much trust

No trust at all

Don’t know

Total a lot/some Jul 2011

Total a lot/some Jun 2012

Total a lot/some Jan 2013

The Australian

58%

12%

46%

26%

10%

6%

69%

60%

65%

The Telegraph (NSW only)

46%

6%

40%

31%

19%

4%

52%

49%

48%

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW only)

70%

18%

52%

22%

5%

3%

74%

69%

71%

The Age (Victoria only)

66%

14%

52%

18%

11%

5%

79%

76%

71%

Herald Sun (Victoria only)

48%

8%

40%

28%

17%

6%

54%

51%

50%

Courier Mail (Queensland only)

48%

8%

40%

33%

13%

6%

65%

51%

57%

* Note : Percentages based only on respondents who had read each newspaper.

Among those who have read the newspaper, 18% have a lot of trust in the SMH and 14% have a lot of trust in The Age. 12% of readers of The Australian have a lot of trust in the newspaper but only 6% have a lot of trust in The Telegraph. 50% have not much or no trust in The Telegraph, 46% not much/no trust in the Courier Mail and 45% not much/no trust in The Herald Sun.

Overall, the most trusted newspapers were the SMH (70% a lot/some trust) and The Age (66%). The least trusted were The Telegraph (46% a lot/some trust), the HeraldSun (48%) and the Courier Mail (48%).

Since this question was asked in 2013, there have been declines in trust in the Courier Mail (down 9%) and The Australian (down 7%), while The Age has declined by 5%.

Trust in media commentators and journalists

Jun 30, 2015

Q. How much trust do you have in the following media commentators and journalists?

Total a lot/some

A lot of trust

Some trust

Not much trust

No trust at all

Don’t know

Total a lot/some Oct 2012

% know them

Laurie Oakes

71%

25%

46%

14%

5%

10%

72%

77%

Sarah Ferguson

51%

12%

39%

19%

10%

20%

50%

Tony Jones

51%

11%

40%

21%

11%

15%

53%

54%

Mark Riley

51%

9%

42%

21%

8%

20%

42%

Michelle Grattan

49%

12%

37%

22%

9%

20%

48%

37%

Neil Mitchell

47%

9%

38%

25%

11%

17%

46%

45%

Chris Uhlmann

46%

11%

35%

22%

12%

20%

35%

Jon Faine

40%

7%

33%

23%

12%

24%

38%

33%

Andrew Bolt

38%

11%

27%

20%

30%

12%

39%

65%

Alan Jones

29%

6%

23%

29%

29%

12%

22%

80%

* Note : Percentages based only on respondents who knew of each commentator/journalist.

The most trusted media commentators and journalists were Laurie Oakes (71%), Sarah Ferguson, Tony Jones and Mark Riley (all 51%).

The least trusted were Alan Jones (29%) and Andrew Bolt (38%).

Funding retirement

Jun 30, 2015

Q. How will you mainly fund your retirement – or if you are already retired, how are you currently mainly funding your retirement?

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

My superannuation

46%

54%

39%

58%

45%

35%

My partner’s superannuation

5%

2%

8%

3%

7%

4%

My savings and investments

16%

17%

15%

23%

17%

7%

My partner’s savings and investments

2%

1%

3%

3%

1%

1%

Government Pension

26%

22%

31%

8%

25%

50%

Other

4%

5%

4%

6%

5%

3%

46% say they will mainly fund (or are funding) their retirement through their superannuation and 26% mainly through the Government pension. 50% of those aged 55+ will rely mainly on the Government pension compared to only 8% of those aged 18-34.

Women are more likely to rely on the Government pension (31%) and less likely to rely on their superannuation (39%). 54% of men will mainly rely on their superannuation. 11% of women say they will rely on their partner’s super or investments.

Best place to invest

Jun 30, 2015

Q. Where do you think is the best place to invest your money?

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

The housing market

29%

29%

30%

34%

33%

18%

Australian share market

15%

18%

11%

12%

14%

18%

Specific companies or businesses

3%

4%

1%

5%

1%

3%

Other investments like art and antiques

*

*

*

*

1%

Investment funds

9%

12%

7%

7%

8%

14%

Leave it in the bank

16%

14%

17%

14%

13%

21%

Not sure

28%

22%

35%

28%

30%

27%

29% think that the housing market is the best place to invest and 16% think it better to leave it in the bank.

35% of women are not sure of the best place to invest.

Retirement expectations

Jun 30, 2015

Q. Do you think that you will have adequate income from your superannuation and investments to live a comfortable lifestyle when you choose to stop working?

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

Yes – definitely

8%

10%

6%

11%

5%

12%

Yes – probably

31%

37%

26%

36%

30%

24%

No – probably not

34%

33%

35%

28%

37%

38%

No – definitely not

15%

10%

20%

10%

17%

20%

Not sure

12%

10%

14%

14%

12%

7%

Based on those working full-time, self-employed or part-time

39% of respondents currently working think they will have adequate income for the retirement and 49% think they will not.

47% of men think they will have adequate income compared to 32% of women. 55% of women think they will not have enough income compared to 43% of men.

47% of those aged 18-34 think they will have enough compared to 35% of those aged 35-54.

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