Export of live animals

Nov 19, 2012

Q. Thinking about the export of live animals for slaughter, which of the following statements is closest to your view?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Australia should not export live sheep and cattle to any country at all

25%

25%

24%

35%

Australia should only export live sheep and cattle to countries which guarantee they will be treated humanely

54%

53%

55%

58%

Australia should export live sheep and cattle to any country that wants them

15%

15%

19%

5%

Don’t know

6%

7%

3%

1%

54% think that Australia should only export live sheep and cattle to countries which guarantee they will be treated humanely and 25% think Australia should not export live sheep and cattle to any country at all.

Those most opposed to exporting live sheep and cattle to any country at all were Greens voters (35%),  women (29%) and respondents aged 45-64 (30%).

Treatment of animals

Nov 19, 2012

Q. Which of the following statements comes closest to your view about the treatment of animals?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Animals deserve the same rights as people to be free from harm and exploitation

30%

30%

28%

40%

Animals deserve some protection from harm and exploitation, but it is still appropriate to use them for the benefit of humans

61%

61%

66%

55%

Animals don’t need much protection from harm and exploitation since they are just animals

4%

4%

3%

2%

Don’t know

5%

5%

3%

3%

61% think animals deserve some protection from harm and exploitation, but it is still appropriate to use them for the benefit of humans and 30% think animals deserve the same rights as people to be free from harm and exploitation. Only 4% think animals don’t need much protection from harm and exploitation since they are just animals.

Those most likely to think animals deserve the same rights as people to be free from harm and exploitation were Greens voters (40%) and women (38%).

Approval of Royal Commission

Nov 19, 2012

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the Government’s decision to hold a Royal Commission into child sexual abuse in institutions?

 

Total

Vote ALP

Vote Libs

Vote Greens

Cath-
olic

Ang-
lican

Other Protest-
ant

Other religion

No religion

Total approve

88%

92%

87%

95%

83%

88%

93%

86%

91%

Total disapprove

4%

2%

6%

3%

6%

6%

2%

3%

3%

Strongly approve

60%

66%

55%

72%

48%

61%

68%

56%

65%

Approve

28%

26%

32%

23%

35%

27%

25%

30%

26%

Disapprove

3%

2%

5%

2%

4%

5%

2%

3%

2%

Strongly disapprove

1%

*

1%

1%

2%

1%

1%

Don’t know

8%

5%

8%

1%

11%

6%

5%

11%

6%

88% approve of the Government’s decision to hold a Royal Commission into child sexual abuse in institutions and 4% disapprove.

The groups most likely to “strongly approve” were aged 65+ (71%), Greens voters (72%), Labor voters (66%), other protestants (68%) and those on incomes less than $1,000 pw (70%).

Important outcomes from Royal Commission

Nov 19, 2012

Q. What are the most important things that should come out of the Royal Commission? (select up to 3)

 

Total

Vote ALP

Vote Libs

Vote Greens

Cath-
olic

Ang-
lican

Other Protest-
ant

Other relig-
ion

No relig-
ion

Preventing future child sexual abuse

63%

63%

63%

74%

65%

59%

62%

57%

65%

Prosecution of offenders

60%

55%

67%

48%

58%

67%

68%

53%

59%

Removing those in positions of authority who allowed the abuse to occur

39%

39%

35%

58%

27%

42%

33%

37%

48%

Giving victims the opportunity to tell their story

27%

31%

24%

28%

28%

28%

30%

27%

25%

Exposing previously unreported or unresolved allegations

27%

26%

30%

24%

28%

23%

27%

26%

29%

Exposing institutional cover-ups

24%

23%

23%

32%

22%

23%

27%

18%

26%

Compensation for victims

16%

18%

12%

15%

19%

19%

13%

18%

13%

Restoring public confidence in institutions

11%

13%

13%

4%

16%

13%

15%

11%

6%

Establishing a public record of fact regarding child sexual abuse in institutions

9%

10%

7%

8%

8%

9%

7%

10%

9%

Don’t know

4%

3%

4%

1%

5%

2%

3%

7%

4%

Prefer not to answer

1%

*

*

1%

1%

1%

Respondents think that the most important things that should come out of the Royal Commission are preventing future child abuse (63%) and prosecution of offenders (60%). 39% think that removing those in positions of authority who allowed the abuse to occur is also important.

These were clearly the top three issues for all groups except Catholics who placed somewhat less importance on removing those in positions of authority who allowed the abuse to occur (27%). Greens voters considered removing those in positions of authority who allowed the abuse to occur (58%) to be more important than prosecution of offenders (48%). Liberal/National voters thought the most important outcome should be prosecution of offenders (67%). Women were a little more likely to nominate preventing future child abuse (69%) and removing those in positions of authority who allowed the abuse to occur (43%).

Federal politics – voting intention

Nov 12, 2012

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,905 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

15/10/12

2 weeks ago

29/10/12

Last week

7/11/12

This week

12/11/12

Liberal

44%

44%

43%

42%

National

3%

4%

3%

3%

Total Lib/Nat

43.6%

47%

48%

46%

45%

Labor

38.0%

36%

36%

37%

37%

Greens

11.8%

9%

9%

9%

9%

Other/Independent

6.6%

8%

7%

8%

8%

 

2PP

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

2 weeks ago

Last week

This week

Total Lib/Nat

49.9%

53%

54%

53%

52%

Labor

50.1%

47%

46%

47%

48%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election. These estimates have a confidence interval of approx. plus or minus 2-3%.

Approval of Julia Gillard

Nov 12, 2012

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the job Julia Gillard is doing as Prime Minister?

 

19 Jul 2010

20 Dec

14 Mar

2011

14 June

12 Sept

12 Dec

12 Mar 2012

12 Jun

10 Sept

15 Oct

12 Nov

Total approve

52%

43%

41%

34%

28%

34%

32%

32%

35%

41%

41%

Total disapprove

30%

40%

46%

54%

64%

54%

61%

56%

54%

51%

49%

Strongly approve

11%

10%

7%

6%

5%

6%

8%

6%

7%

9%

7%

Approve

41%

33%

34%

28%

23%

28%

24%

26%

28%

32%

34%

Disapprove

17%

24%

22%

29%

28%

25%

29%

22%

27%

24%

25%

Strongly disapprove

13%

16%

24%

25%

36%

29%

32%

34%

27%

27%

24%

Don’t know

18%

17%

13%

13%

8%

11%

7%

12%

11%

8%

10%

41% (no change) approve of the job Julia Gillard is doing as Prime Minister and 49% (down 2%) disapprove – a 2-point change in net rating from -10 to -8. This is Julia Gillard’s best approval rating since May 2011.

85% of Labor voters approve (down 2%) and 8% disapprove (down 1%).

By gender – men 37% approve/53% disapprove, women 44% approve/44% disapprove.  In net terms this represents a decline with men from -14 to -16 and an improvement with women from -4 to 0.

Approval of Tony Abbott

Nov 12, 2012

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the job Tony Abbott is doing as Opposition Leader?

 

18 Jan

2010

5 Jul

 

20 Dec

14 Mar

2011

14 June

12 Sept

12 Dec

12 Mar 2012

12 Jun

10 Sept

15 Oct

12 Nov

Total approve

37%

37%

39%

38%

38%

39%

32%

36%

32%

32%

37%

33%

Total disapprove

37%

47%

39%

47%

48%

50%

53%

52%

54%

55%

54%

58%

Strongly approve

5%

8%

9%

7%

6%

8%

6%

7%

6%

6%

9%

6%

Approve

32%

29%

30%

31%

32%

31%

26%

29%

26%

26%

28%

27%

Disapprove

20%

23%

21%

24%

25%

23%

25%

23%

24%

26%

23%

28%

Strongly disapprove

17%

24%

18%

23%

23%

27%

28%

29%

30%

29%

31%

30%

Don’t know

26%

16%

22%

16%

15%

11%

14%

12%

13%

13%

9%

10%

Tony Abbott’s approval rating has dropped over the last month. 33% (down 4%) approve of the job Tony Abbott is doing as Opposition Leader and 58% (up 4%) disapprove – a change in net rating from -17 to -25 over the last 4 weeks. This is Tony Abbott’s lowest rating since he became Opposition Leader.

65% (down 9%) of Coalition voters approve and 29% (up 7%) disapprove.

By gender – men 36% approve/56% disapprove, women 29% approve/59% disapprove. In net terms this represents a decline with men from -16 to -20 and with women from -19 to -30.

Better Prime Minister

Nov 12, 2012

Q. Who do you think would make the better Prime Minister out of Julia Gillard and Tony Abbott?

 

5 Jul 2010

14 Mar 2011

14 June

12 Sept

12 Dec

12 Mar 2012

12 Jun

10 Sept

15 Oct

12 Nov

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Julia Gillard

53%

44%

41%

36%

39%

40%

37%

40%

43%

45%

86%

6%

81%

Tony Abbott

26%

33%

36%

40%

35%

37%

37%

37%

36%

32%

4%

71%

4%

Don’t know

21%

23%

24%

24%

26%

23%

26%

24%

20%

23%

10%

23%

15%

45% (up 2%) believe Julia Gillard would make the better Prime Minister and 32% (down 4%) prefer Tony Abbott. This is Julia Gillard’s best result since February 2011.

Men prefer Julia Gillard 40%/36% and women prefer Julia Gillard 49%/28%. Compared to last month’s figures, Julia Gillard’s margin over Tony Abbott has changed 4 points in her favour among men (from 40%/40%) and 7 points among women (from 47%/33%).

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