Perceptions of incomes

Nov 14, 2017

Thinking about types of workers, as far as you know, do you think the following types of worker are paid too much, not enough about right?

  Paid too much Paid about right Not paid enough Don’t know
Politicians 74% 18% 3% 5%
CEOs/senior executives 72% 18% 3% 7%
Lawyers 65% 25% 3% 7%
Accountants 32% 51% 6% 10%
Managers 22% 61% 7% 11%
Journalists 20% 55% 7% 17%
Doctors 20% 58% 14% 8%
Engineers 15% 65% 9% 11%
IT workers 14% 64% 11% 11%
Bank workers 9% 67% 13% 11%
Retail workers 2% 40% 49% 8%
Hospitality workers 3% 38% 51% 8%
Teachers 6% 31% 58% 5%
Child care workers 4% 23% 66% 6%
Nurses 3% 22% 69% 6%

Well over half believe that politicians (74%), CEO’s/senior executives (72%) and lawyers (65%) are paid too much.

A majority believe that nurses (69%), child care workers (66%), teachers (58%) and hospitality workers (51%) are not paid enough.

There were few significant differences across demographics.

Those on higher incomes ($2,000+ pw) were somewhat less likely to think lawyers (56%), accountants (22%), managers (14%) and CEO’s/senior executives (62%) were paid too much.

Women were more likely to think child care workers (74%) and nurses (76%) were not paid enough

Federal voting intention

Nov 6, 2017

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   Last week 31/10/17 2 weeks ago 24/10/17 4 weeks ago 10/10/17   Election  2 Jul 16
Liberal 34% 33% 34% 33%
National 3% 3% 3% 3%
Total Liberal/National 37%   36% 37% 36%   42.0%
Labor 37%   37% 36% 38%   34.7%
Greens 10% 10% 9% 10% 10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 2% 3% 3% 2%
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 8% 7% 8% 7%
Other/Independent 6% 6% 7% 7% 13.1%
2 party preferred
Liberal National 47%   46% 48% 46%   50.4%
Labor 53%   54% 52% 54%   49.6%

Sample = 1,792. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Attributes of the Liberal Party

Nov 6, 2017

Q. Here is a list of things both favourable and unfavourable that have been said about various political parties. Which statements do you feel fit the Liberal Party?

  Total Change   Jul 2009 April 2011 Aug 2013 Nov 2015 Jun 2016
Divided 68% +17   74% 49% 31% 56% 52%
Will promise to do anything to win votes 67% +2   67% 65% 65% 68% 65%
Out of touch with ordinary people 66% +3   62% 54% 58% 62% 63%
Too close to the big corporate and financial interests 65% -1     60% 60% 67% 66%
Moderate 53% +6   50% 55% 48% 51% 47%
Have a vision for the future 48% -3     48% 51% 54% 51%
Have good policies 45% +4       38% 43% 41%
Understands the problems facing Australia 41% -3   44% 51% 48% 46% 44%
Clear about what they stand for 40% -6     44% 45% 46% 46%
Has a good team of leaders 37% -5   29% 40% 36% 48% 42%
Extreme 37% -1   36% 36% 39% 39% 38%
Looks after the interests of working people 36% +5     38% 36% 32% 31%
Trustworthy 34% +4       30% 29% 30%
Keeps its promises 32% +2   28% 33% 32% 25% 30%

 

The Liberal Party’s main attributes were – divided (68%), will promise anything to win votes (67%), out of touch with ordinary people (66%) and too close to the big corporate and financial interest (65%).

 

Main changes since June last year, were – divided (up 17%), moderate (up 6%) and clear about what they stand for (down 6%).

Attributes of the Labor Party

Nov 6, 2017

Q. And which statements do you feel fit the Labor Party?

  Total Change   Jul 2009 April 2011 Aug 2013 Nov 2015 Jun 2016
Will promise to do anything to win votes 69% +5   57% 72% 65% 64% 64%
Looks after the interests of working people 58% +2 39% 53% 55% 56%
Moderate 52% -2 65% 51% 48% 56% 54%
Out of touch with ordinary people 52% +6 44% 61% 51% 52% 46%
Divided 51% +2   30% 66% 66% 58% 49%
Have a vision for the future 49% +1 43% 49% 42% 48%
Understands the problems facing Australia 48% -1 62% 40% 50% 48% 49%
Clear about what they stand for 45% +2 28% 38% 37% 43%
Have good policies 44% -2 46% 42% 46%
Too close to the big corporate and financial interests 42% +7 46% 31% 37% 35%
Extreme 41% +11   25% 38% 34% 30% 30%
Has a good team of leaders 39% 60% 34% 36% 33% 39%
Trustworthy 32% -1 30% 34% 33%
Keeps its promises 31%   44% 20% 27% 29% 31%

 

The Labor Party’s main attributes were – will promise anything to win votes (69%), looks after the interests of working people (58%), moderate (52%) and out of touch with ordinary people (52%).

Since this question was asked in June last year, the main changes have been for extreme (up 11%), too close to the big corporate and financial interests (up 7%) and out of touch with ordinary people (up 6%).

Party Attributes Comparison – Labor vs Liberal

Nov 6, 2017
  Liberal Labor   Difference
Too close to the big corporate and financial interests 65% 42%   +23
Divided 68% 51%   +17
Out of touch with ordinary people 66% 52%   +14
Trustworthy 34% 32%   +2
Moderate 53% 52%   +1
Keeps its promises 32% 31%   +1
Have good policies 45% 44%   +1
Have a vision for the future 48% 49%   -1
Has a good team of leaders 37% 39%   -2
Will promise to do anything to win votes 67% 69%   -2
Extreme 37% 41%   -4
Clear about what they stand for 40% 45%   -5
Understands the problems facing Australia 41% 48%   -7
Looks after the interests of working people 36% 58%   -22

 

 

 

 

 

The Labor Party is viewed more favourably in terms of looking after the interest of working people (-22) and not being too close to the big corporate and financial interests (+23), divided (+17) or out of touch with ordinary people (+14).

Uluru Statement

Nov 6, 2017

Q. A few months ago the “Uluru Statement” was released, calling for a number of policy measures relating to Indigenous Australians.
Do you support or oppose the following measures?

  Total Support Total Oppose   Strongly Support Support Neither Support nor Oppose Oppose Strongly Oppose Don’t Know   Jun 2017
Enshrining an Indigenous voice to parliament in the constitution 45% 16% 20% 25% 28% 7% 9% 11% 44%
Negotiating a treaty between the federal government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. 47% 16% 19% 28% 28% 8% 8% 9% 43%
Creating a treaty commission to negotiate treaties between various levels of government and different Indigenous language groups or tribes 41% 19% 16% 25% 29% 10% 9% 10% 39%
Creating a truth and reconciliation commission 43% 18% 18% 25% 29% 10% 8% 11%   39%

 

Each measure had greater support than opposition, with the most popular being negotiating a treaty (47% support).

45% support enshrining an Indigenous voice to parliament in the constitution. Support was greatest for this measure among Greens voters (67% support), ALP voters (61%) and aged 18-34 (56%). 37% of Liberal/National voters support and 24% oppose.

 

There has been no significant change since this question was last asked in June.

Voting in same sex marriage survey

Nov 6, 2017

Q. Have you voted in the national postal vote on same-sex marriage?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   19 Sep 26 Sep 3 Oct 24 Oct
Yes, I have voted 86%   89% 91% 91% 91%   9% 36% 47% 75%
No, I have not voted 14%   11% 9% 9% 9%          

 

  Total   Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+
Yes, I have voted 86%   86% 86% 80% 84% 94%
No, I have not voted 14%   14% 14% 20% 16% 6%

 

86% say they have voted in the same sex marriage survey – up 11% in the past 2 weeks.

94% of those aged 55+ say they have voted compared to 80% of those aged under 35.

Vote in same sex marriage survey

Nov 6, 2017

Q. Did you answer yes or no to the question “Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry? (Based on those who have voted)

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   3 Oct 24 Oct
Yes 64%   79% 54% 92% 44%   64% 60%
No 31%   16% 43% 4% 51%   30% 34%
Don’t know/Prefer not to say 5%   5% 3% 4% 5%   6% 5%

 

  Total   Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+
Yes 64%   58% 69% 77% 64% 50%
No 31%   27% 25% 17% 30% 46%
Don’t know/Prefer not to say 5%   5% 6% 6% 6% 4%

Of those who have voted, 64% say they voted yes (up 4% from 2 weeks ago) and 31% no (down 3%). 5% did not give an answer.

Those most likely to have voted yes are Greens voters (92%), Labor voters (79%), aged 18-34 (77%) and women (69%).

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