Media Coverage of Politicians’ Private Lives

May 31, 2010

Q. There have been some recent situations where a politician has resigned from their position or their party after some aspects of their sexual behaviour were made public by the media. Is it appropriate for the media to reveal details of a political figure’s private life?

Yes, in all circumstances 12%
Yes, in some circumstances 42%
No, not at all 38%
Don’t know 8%

A majority (54%) believe it is appropriate for the media to reveal details of a political figure’s personal life in some or all circumstances. 12% think details should be revealed in all circumstances and 42% in some circumstances. 38% say details of a political figure’s personal life should not be revealed at all. 64% of Liberal/National voters and 50% of Labor voters approved revealing details of political figure’s personal life in some or all circumstances.  Greens voters were split 50% some/all, 50% not at all. There were no substantial demographic differences. Comments »

Media Coverage of Political Figures Private Lives

May 31, 2010

If answered “in some circumstances” –

Q. Is it appropriate for the media to reveal details of a political figure’s private life in any of the following circumstances?

  Yes No Don’t know
Where there is a public interest due to impact on the politician’s work or taxpayers’ resources 92% 5% 3%
Where the politician has acted in a way clearly at odds with their publicly expressed views 88% 8% 4%
Where a politician’s personal choices are unusual or not considered mainstream 20% 67% 14%

Sample = 457

The majority of those who approved revealing details in some circumstances agreed that details could be revealed where there is a public interest due to impact on the politician’s work or taxpayers’ resources (92%) or where the politician has acted in a way clearly at odds with their publicly expressed views (88%). However, revealing details where a politician’s personal choices are unusual or not considered mainstream was only acceptable to 20%. Comments »

Modelling Successful Environment Campaigning – The Lessons of the 2010 Tasmanian Election

May 28, 2010

The Tasmanian election in March created history. For the first time the Greens polled over 20% of the vote in a state wide lower house election and as a result Australia has its first Greens Minister in the new ALP/Greens government.

While the media wallowed in superficial explanations – the Greens had an ‘articulate and electable leader’ and appealed to the mythical ‘middle ground’ they completely ignored the impact of the third party ‘Our Common Ground’ campaign run by Environment Tasmania and The Wilderness Society (ET/TWS) and other community organisations.

In doing so they failed to understand the strategy behind the first environment campaign since the WA Election in 2001 that has influenced the outcome of an election. Before that you have to go back to the 1990 Federal Election. In between times environmental election campaigns have generally failed to gain traction or worse backfired harming the party supporting the environment. Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

May 24, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

1,911 sample size

First preference/leaning to 6 months ago 4 weeks ago Last week This week

 

Liberal 36% 36% 41% 39%
National 3% 3% 2% 2%
Total Lib/Nat 39% 39% 43% 41%
Labor 45% 42% 38% 40%
Greens 7% 9% 10% 10%
Family First 3% 3% 2% 2%
Other/Independent 6% 7% 7% 7%

 

2PP 6 months ago 4 weeks ago Last week This week

 

Total Lib/Nat 45% 46% 50% 48%
Labor 55% 54% 50% 52%

 NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the aggregation of two weeks’ polling data.   Comments »

Opinion of Kevin Rudd and the Labor Party

May 24, 2010

Opinion of Kevin Rudd an the Labor Party

 Q. Would you say that your view of Kevin Rudd and the Labor Government has become more or less favourable in recent weeks? 

Total more favourable 11%
Total less favourable 58%
Much more favourable 3%
A little more favourable 8%
A little less favourable 25%
Much less favourable 33%
No change 26%
Don’t know 3%

58% of respondents said their view of Kevin Rudd and the Labor Government had become less favourable over recent weeks and 11% said they had become more favourable.

22% of Labor voters said they had become more favourable and 31% less favourable. Coalition voters split 4% more favourable/81% less favourable and Greens voters 23% more favourable/58% less favourable.

47% of those aged under 35 were less favourable compared to 66% of those aged 45+. Comments »

View of Kevin Rudd

May 24, 2010

If a little less or much less favourable –

Q. And which of the following would you say has been the main reason for your view of Kevin Rudd and the Labor Government becoming less favourable in recent weeks?

Not honouring their election commitments 24%
Too much spending 15%
Too soft on asylum seekers 15%
Problems with insulation and school building programs 13%
The 40% tax on mining companies 12%
Postponing introduction of ETS to address climate change 7%
Too tough on asylum seekers 4%
Some other reason 7%
No particular reason 6%

 Sample size = 642

Of those who had a less favourable view of Kevin Rudd and the Labor Government, 24% said their main reason was not honouring their election commitments, 15% too much spending and 15% thought the Government was too soft on asylum seekers.

Among Labor voters the main reasons were not honouring election commitments (30%) and problems with the insulation and school building programs (14%).

For Coalition voters the main reasons were not honouring election commitments (27%), the 40% tax on mining companies (18%) and too much spending (17%).

For Greens voters the main reasons were postponing the introduction of the ETS (34%) and problems with then insulation and school building programs (16%). Comments »

Opinion of Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party

May 24, 2010

Q. Would you say that your view of Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party has become more or less favourable in recent weeks?

Total more favourable 26%
Total less favourable 34%
Much more favourable 7%
A little more favourable 19%
A little less favourable 13%
Much less favourable 21%
No change 36%
Don’t know 4%

 34% of respondents said their view of Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party had become less favourable over recent weeks and 26% said they had become more favourable.

55% of Coalition voters said they had become more favourable and 13% less favourable. Labor voters split 8% more favourable/52% less favourable and Greens voters 15% more favourable/61% less favourable.

 31% of men had become more favourable compared to 22% of women.

Those on higher incomes had the most favourable view – respondents with incomes over $1,600 pw were 34% more favourable/32% less favourable. Comments »

View of Tony Abbott

May 24, 2010

If a little more or much more favourable –

Q. And which of the following would you say has been the main reason for your view of Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party becoming more favourable in recent weeks?

Tony Abbott is more in touch with ordinary Australians 21%
They would cut Government spending 20%
They oppose the 40% tax on mining companies 15%
They would be tough on asylum seekers 12%
Liberal Party is more united under Tony Abbott 11%
They oppose introduction of ETS to address climate change 9%
Some other reason 4%
No particular reason 8%

Sample size = 269

The main reasons for having a more favourable view of Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party were that Tony Abbott is more in touch with ordinary Australians (21%) and the Liberals would cut Government spending (20%). Opposing the 40% tax on mining companies rated third with 15%.

For Coalition voters the main reasons were that Tony Abbott is more in touch with ordinary Australians (24%) and the Liberals would cut Government spending (24%).

27% of those on higher incomes (over $1,000 pw) said Tony Abbott is more in touch with ordinary Australians compared to 12% of those on lower incomes (under $1,000 pw). Comments »

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