Interest rates

Aug 9, 2016

Q. Will the recent cut in official interest rates make you personally better off or worse off financially?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+
Total better off 25%   26% 28% 22% 20%   30% 31% 7%
Total worse off 29%   32% 28% 31% 28%   21% 21% 49%
Much better off 3%   3% 4% 2% 2%   4% 3% 1%
A little better off 22%   23% 24% 20% 18%   26% 28% 6%
A little worse off 19%   20% 20% 26% 16%   17% 14% 30%
Much worse off 10%   12% 8% 5% 12%   4% 7% 19%
Make no difference 36%   33% 37% 37% 46%   30% 37% 42%
Don’t know 11%   10% 8% 10% 5%   19% 10% 2%

 25% think that the recent cut in official interest rates will make them personally better off and 29% think it will make them worse off.

Those more likely to think they will be better off were aged 25-44 (35%), full-time workers (36%) and incomes over $2,000 pw (40%).

Those more likely to think they will be worse off were aged 55+ (49%), earning less than $1,000 pw (37%) and those not working (36%).

Federal voting intention

Aug 2, 2016

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   Last week

26/7/16

2 weeks ago

19/7/16

4 weeks ago

5/7/16

  Election 7 Sep 13
Liberal 36%   35% 35% 38%    
National 3%   4% 4% 3%    
Total Liberal/National 39%   39% 39% 41%   45.6%
Labor 37%   37% 36% 37%   33.4%
Greens 10%   10% 10% 10%   8.6%
Nick Xenophon Team 4%   4% 4% 2%  
Other/Independent 10%   11% 10% 10%   12.4%
2 party preferred              
Liberal National 48%   48% 49% 50%   53.5%
Labor 52%   52% 51% 50%   46.5%

NB: Sample = 1,817. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2013 election.

Trust in media

Aug 2, 2016

Q. How much trust did you have in the way the following media reported and commented on the Federal election campaign?

  Total a lot/some trust Total not much/no trust Net   A lot of trust Some trust Not much trust No trust at all Don’t know Don’t use
ABC TV 65% 17% +48 26% 39% 11% 6% 6% 12%
SBS TV 61% 15% +46 21% 40% 11% 4% 7% 18%
ABC radio 54% 18% +36 20% 34% 12% 6% 5% 22%
Sydney Morning Herald (NSW) 45% 25% +20 11% 34% 19% 6% 7% 22%
The Australian 37% 25% +12 8% 29% 18% 7% 6% 30%
The Age (Victoria) 42% 33% +9 7% 35% 22% 11% 5% 21%
Courier Mail (Queensland) 37% 37%   6% 31% 25% 12% 5% 21%
Commercial TV 42% 44% -2 4% 38% 33% 11% 7% 7%
The Telegraph (NSW) 35% 39% -4 10% 25% 25% 14% 7% 20%
Commercial radio 35% 41% -6 4% 31% 30% 11% 7% 17%
Herald Sun (Victoria) 35% 43% -8 5% 30% 27% 16% 5% 16%

 

The media most trusted for reporting and commentary on the election were ABC TV (65% trust), SBS TV (61%) and ABC radio (54%).

The most trusted newspapers were the Sydney Morning Herald (45%), The Australian (37%) and The Age (42%).

The least trusted media were the Herald Sun (43% not much or no trust), commercial TV (44%) and commercial radio (41%).

Voting at election

Aug 2, 2016

Q. Which of the following best describes how you voted in the recent Federal election?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
I voted for the party that I want to lead Australia 74%   83% 86% 74% 49%
I voted against the party I don’t want to lead Australia 17%   14% 10% 22% 44%
Don’t know 9%   3% 4% 5% 7%

74% said they voted for the party they wanted to lead Australia and 17% said they voted against the party they didn’t want to lead Australia.

44% of those who voted independent or for minor parties said they voted against the party they didn’t want to lead Australia.

Groups better or worse off

Aug 2, 2016

Q. Do you think the following groups of people will become better off or worse off under the newly elected Coalition Government?

  Total better off Total worse off Net   A lot better off A little better off Stay the same A little worse off A lot worse off Don’t know
Large corporations 49% 9% +40 26% 23% 25% 7% 2% 16%
Banks and other financial institutions 48% 8% +40 24% 24% 29% 5% 3% 16%
People and families on high incomes 43% 13% +30 15% 28% 29% 10% 3% 15%
Families with children at private school 28% 14% +14 7% 21% 40% 9% 5% 17%
Small businesses 30% 19% +11 6% 24% 36% 13% 6% 15%
Recent immigrants to Australia 18% 29% -11 6% 12% 35% 16% 13% 19%
People and families on middle incomes 16% 31% -15 3% 13% 39% 21% 10% 14%
Farmers and other agricultural producers 15% 32% -17 3% 12% 34% 18% 14% 18%
People with disabilities 13% 37% -24 3% 10% 34% 19% 18% 16%
Families with children at public school 11% 35% -24 2% 9% 38% 23% 12% 16%
Average working people 11% 38% -27 3% 8% 37% 24% 14% 14%
Unemployed people 12% 40% -28 2% 10% 31% 20% 20% 17%
Pensioners 11% 40% -29 3% 8% 34% 21% 19% 15%
Single parents 10% 39% -29   3% 7% 34% 23% 16% 17%
People and families on low incomes 12% 45% -33 2% 10% 29% 23% 22% 14%

Respondents believed the following groups will be better off under the new Coalition Government – large corporations (49%), banks and other financial institutions (48%) and people and families on high incomes (43%).

The groups thought to be worse off were people on low incomes (45%), pensioners (40%), the unemployed (40%), single parents (39%), average working people (38%) and people with disabilities (37%).

Kevin Rudd as UN Secretary General

Aug 2, 2016

Q. Former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has asked the Federal Government to nominate him to be the next Secretary General of the United Nations. Do you think the Federal Government should or should not nominate Kevin Rudd for UN Secretary General?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Should nominate Kevin Rudd 36%   53% 26% 40% 32%
Should not nominate Kevin Rudd 39%   23% 57% 37% 47%
Don’t know 25%   24% 18% 23% 20%

36% think that the Federal Government should nominate Kevin Rudd for UN Secretary General and 39% think they should not.

53% of Labor voters think the Government should nominate Kevin Rudd and 57% of Liberal/National voters think they should not.

 

Note – the majority of respondents completed this survey before the Government had announced it would not nominate Kevin Rudd.

Tony Abbott

Aug 2, 2016

Q. Do you think Tony Abbott should –

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Stay in Parliament on the backbench 21%   22% 26% 18% 19%
Stay in Parliament and be given a Ministry 25%   11% 43% 13% 29%
Resign from Parliament 37%   51% 18% 63% 38%
Don’t know 17%   16% 12% 6% 14%

37% think that Tony Abbott should resign from Parliament, 25% think he should stay in Parliament and be given a ministry and 21% think he should stay in Parliament on the backbench.

51% of Labor voters and 63% of Greens voters think he should resign while 43% of Liberal/National voters think he should remain and be given a ministry.

A similar question asked in March found that 47% thought Tony Abbott should resign immediately or at the next election, 18% thought he should stay and be given a ministry and 15% thought he should stay on the backbench.

Superannuation

Aug 2, 2016

Q. The Federal Government is proposing to introduce a lifetime $500,000 ceiling on after-tax super contributions backdated to 2007. Do you approve or disapprove of capping after-tax contributions to superannuation at $500,000?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Less than $600 pw $600-$1000 pw $1000-$2000 pw $2000+ pw
Total approve           29%   25% 38% 37% 22%   16% 34% 36% 28%
Total disapprove 34%   34% 33% 31% 46%   34% 19% 31% 45%
Strongly approve 9%   8% 11% 17% 6%   7% 10% 12% 8%
Approve 20%   17% 27% 20% 16%   9% 24% 24% 20%
Disapprove 20%   22% 18% 21% 22%   26% 10% 18% 25%
Strongly disapprove 14%   12% 15% 10% 24%   8% 9% 13% 20%
Don’t know 37%   41% 27% 32% 32%   50% 46% 33% 27%

29% approve of the proposed $500,000 cap on after-tax superannuation contributions and 34% disapprove. 37% have no opinion.

45% of those earning more than $2,000pw disapproved.

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