Privacy on the internet

Feb 7, 2017

Q. In the last 12 months, have you taken any of the following actions to protect your privacy on the internet?

  Total   Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+   Aug 2015
Cleared cookies and browser in history 73%   76% 70% 74% 76% 69%   77%
Stopped using a website you think might be using information about you 54%   55% 53% 58% 55% 50%   54%
Set your browser to disable or turned off cookies 46%   48% 45% 50% 46% 43%   51%
Deleted something you posted in the past 46%   45% 47% 58% 46% 33%   48%
Decided not to use a website because they wanted your real name 42%   35% 40% 49% 42% 36%   43%
Used a false name or untraceable username 32%   35% 29% 44% 32% 17%   33%
Use a non-identifiable email address 26%   30% 21% 39% 26% 11%   27%
Used a Virtual Private Network or Tor 18%   24% 12% 28% 15% 10%   16%

Note: previous surveys asked if “ever” taken these actions.

Actions most likely to have been taken to protect privacy were clearing cookies and browser in history (73%), stopped using a website that might be using your information (54%) and setting browser to disable or turning off cookies (46%).

There has been little change since this question was last asked in 2015.

Federal voting intention

Jan 31, 2017

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   Last week 24/1/17   Election 2 Jul 16
Liberal 32% 33%
National 3% 3%
Total Liberal/National 35%   35%   42.0%
Labor 37%   37%   34.7%
Greens 9% 10% 10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 3% 3%
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 10% 9%
Other/Independent 6% 6% 13.1%
2 party preferred
Liberal National 46%   46%   50.4%
Labor 54%   54%   49.6%

NB. Sample = 1,790. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Australian society

Jan 31, 2017

Q. Thinking about our current political and economic system – that is, the structures that set the rules for the way Australian society operates – which of the following best describes your view?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
The system needs to be fundamentally changed 40%   44% 31% 43% 52%
The system is fundamentally sound but needs to be refined 44%   43% 52% 54% 38%
The system works well as it is and should not be changed in any substantial way 6%   3% 10% 1% 5%
Don’t know 11%   9% 7% 2% 5%

44% think Australia’s political and economic system is fundamentally sound but needs to be refined and 40% think the system needs to be fundamentally changed. Only 6% think it should not be changed in any way.

Those most likely to think it needs fundamental change were “other” voters (52%) and those on incomes under $1,000 pw (47%).

Those most likely to think the system just needs to be refined were LNP voters (52%), Greens voters (54%) and incomes over $2,000 pw (52%).

Free Trade Agreements generally

Jan 31, 2017

Q. Generally, do you think making Free Trade Agreements with other countries is good for Australia or bad for Australia? 

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Apr 2014
Total good 47%   46% 61% 39% 36%   49%
Total bad 15%   15% 10% 24% 27%   11%
Very good 10%   10% 12% 7% 8%   13%
Good 37%   36% 49% 32% 28%   36%
Neither good nor bad 21%   23% 17% 17% 22%   18%
Bad 11%   10% 8% 18% 18%   7%
Very bad 4%   5% 2% 6% 9%   4%
Don’t know 17%   16% 12% 21% 15%   22%

47% think that free trade agreements are generally good for Australia and 15% think they are bad. 21% think they are neither and 17% could not give an opinion. These results are similar to those when this question was last asked in April 2014.

Those most likely to think they were good were Liberal/National voters (61%), full-time workers (52%), incomes over $2,000 pw (55%) and those with university education (54%).

TPP

Jan 31, 2017

Q. The new US President, Donald Trump, has announced the US will pull out of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade agreement between 12 Asia Pacific countries. Do you think Australia should pull out of the TPP or continue to negotiate an agreement without the US?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Australia should pull out of TPP 19%   22% 15% 30% 23%
Australia should negotiate an agreement without US 52%   52% 57% 53% 51%
Don’t know 29%   25% 28% 17% 26%

52% think that now that the US has pulled out of the TPP, Australia should continue to negotiate an agreement. 19% think Australia should now pull out of the TPP.

There was very little difference in views across demographics and voter groups.

Groups that benefit from free trade agreements

Jan 31, 2017

Q. How much do you think the following benefit from Free Trade agreements with other countries? 

  Total some/a lot   A lot of benefit Some benefit Little benefit No benefit Don’t know   Nov 2014 some/a lot
The Australian Government 59%   20% 39% 14% 5% 22%   52%
Australian businesses overall 59%   19% 40% 14% 5% 22%   44%
Mining companies 58%   26% 32% 12% 6% 24%   48%
The Australian economy in general 51%   13% 38% 20% 7% 21%   37%
Manufacturing firms 50%   16% 34% 18% 10% 23%   34%
Tourism operators 48%   17% 31% 19% 9% 25%   41%
Farmers 45%   16% 29% 19% 13% 22%   37%
Working people 41%   11% 30% 22% 16% 22%   25%

A majority think that there are some or a lot of benefit from free trade for the Australian Government (59%), businesses overall (59%), mining companies (58%), the Australian economy in general (51%) and manufacturing companies (50%).

There was least benefit for working people (41% benefit/38% little or no benefit).

There have been substantial increases in perceptions of benefit from free trade for all groups since this question was asked in November 2014.

Level of taxation

Jan 31, 2017

Q. Do you think the following pay too much tax, not enough tax or about the right amount?

  Pay too much Don’t pay enough Pay about right amount Don’t know   Mar 2015 Pay too much Mar 2015 Don’t pay enough Mar 2015 Pay about right amount Mar 2015 Don’t know
Large businesses 6% 65% 13% 16%   3% 64% 14% 19%
Small businesses 37% 8% 39% 17%   41% 6% 34% 19%
People on low incomes 46% 7% 34% 13%   47% 5% 36% 13%
People on average incomes 43% 6% 39% 12%   43% 5% 41% 11%
People on high incomes 11% 59% 18% 12%   10% 59% 19% 12%
You personally 39% 5% 42% 14%   36% 4% 47% 13%
Mining companies 5% 61% 13% 21%   4% 67% 12% 17%
Retirees on large incomes 13% 31% 31% 24%   15% 29% 30% 26%
Large international companies (such as Google and Apple) 2% 72% 9% 17%   2% 73% 8% 18%
Religious organisations 3% 58% 18% 21%   5% 53% 16% 26%

From the groups listed, people on low income (46%), people on average incomes (43%), you personally (39%) and small businesses (37%) and were the groups respondents were most likely to think pay too much tax.

More than half of respondents believe that large international companies (72%), large businesses (65%), mining companies (61%), people on high incomes (59%) and religious organisations (58%) do not pay enough tax.

Overall, Labor voters were more likely than Liberal voters to think the following groups pay too much tax – low incomes (Labor 55%/LNP37%) and average incomes (48%/39%).

Labor voters were also more likely to think the following don’t pay enough tax – large businesses (73%/57%), people on high incomes (66%/50%) and mining companies (68%/55%).

Results were very similar to when this question was asked in March 2015.

Impact of higher tax on multinational corporations

Jan 31, 2017

Q. Do you think that making big multinational corporations pay more tax would be good for the economy because it would increase Government revenue or bad for the economy because these companies would stop investing in Australia?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Mar 2015
Good for the economy 60%   64% 57% 75% 64%   60%
Bad for the economy 11%   10% 14% 4% 12%   13%
Don’t know 29%   27% 29% 22% 23%   27%

60% think that making big multinational corporations pay more tax would be good for the economy because it would increase Government revenue and 11% think it would be bad for the economy because these companies would stop investing in Australia. These results are much the same when this question was asked in March 2015.

A majority of all voter groups believe it would be good for the economy. 67% of respondents aged 55+ and 66% of those with university degrees think it would be good for the economy.

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