Trust in industries

Mar 7, 2017

Q. How much trust do you have in the following industries to act in the public interest? 

  Total a lot/some trust   A lot of trust Some trust Not much trust No trust at all Don’t know   Jan 2013

A lot/ some trust

Tourism 70% 18% 52% 16% 5% 9% 68%
Agriculture 68% 18% 50% 15% 6% 11% 72%
Manufacturing 55% 8% 47% 27% 9% 10% 56%
Retail 53% 8% 45% 29% 10% 9% 47%
Construction and development 46% 8% 38% 31% 14% 9% 48%
Telecommunications 36% 7% 29% 35% 20% 9% 37%
Mining 36%   6% 30% 30% 245 11% 32%
Banking 33%   8% 25% 30% 30% 7% 33%
Media 29%   3% 26% 31% 31% 8% 30%
Power companies 24% 3% 21% 35% 32% 8% 18%

The industries most trusted to act in the public interest were tourism (70% some/a lot of trust), agriculture (68%) and manufacturing (55%).

The industries least trusted to act in the public interest were power companies (24%), the media (29%), banking (33%) and mining (36%).

Since this question was asked in 2013, trust in power companies has increased 6 points – although remains the least trusted industry.

The only industry on which there were major differences was mining where 50% of Liberal/National voters had a lot/some trust compared to only 30% of Labor voters and 18% of Greens voters.

Tony Abbott’s policy proposals

Mar 7, 2017

Q. Do you agree or disagree with the following proposals for actions the Federal Government could take?

  Total agree Total disagree   Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
Abolish subsidies for renewables and cut renewable energy targets to reduce household power bills 40% 38% 12% 28% 19% 19% 22%
Abolish the Human Rights Commission to allow more free speech 33% 44% 12% 21% 25% 19% 23%
Stop all new government spending to reduce future debt 43% 41% 15% 28% 29% 12% 17%
Cut immigration to make housing more affordable 57% 28% 27% 30% 18% 10% 15%
Reform the Senate to reduce the power of small parties. 41% 34% 14% 27% 22% 12% 25%

Q. Do you agree or disagree with the following proposals for actions which Tony Abbott has said the Federal Government should take

  Total agree Total disagree   Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
Abolish subsidies for renewables and cut renewable energy targets to reduce household power bills 47% 33% 16% 31% 13% 20% 20%
Abolish the Human Rights Commission to allow more free speech 39% 43% 14% 25% 25% 18% 18%
Stop all new government spending to reduce future debt 51% 35% 22% 29% 25% 10% 14%
Cut immigration to make housing more affordable 57% 31% 29% 28% 18% 13% 12%
Reform the Senate to reduce the power of small parties. 41% 37% 18% 23% 23% 14% 23%


Note: this question was split so that half the sample were told that Tony Abbott had made these proposals and half were asked about the proposals without any reference to Tony Abbott.

The question which referenced Tony Abbott showed higher support for cutting the RET, abolishing the Human Rights Commission and stopping all new Government spending but similar support for cutting immigration and reforming the Senate.

Overall, support for each proposal was higher than opposition except for abolishing the Human Rights Commission.

Among Liberal National voters, reference to Tony Abbott increased agreement with stopping new spending (from 51% to 62%) but made only small differences to other proposals.

Among Labor voters, reference to Tony Abbott increased agreement with abolishing the RET (from 36% to 44%) and abolishing the Human Rights Commission (from 24% to 32%).

A majority of Liberal National voters agreed with each proposal except for abolishing the Human Rights Commission.

No reference to Tony Abbott Total agree Total disagree   Labor voters agree Labor voters disagree LNP Voters agree LNP voters disagree
Abolish subsidies for renewables and cut renewable energy targets to reduce household power bills 40% 38% 36% 46% 56% 24%
Abolish the Human Rights Commission to allow more free speech 33% 44% 24% 56% 42% 39%
Stop all new government spending to reduce future debt 43% 41% 38% 47% 51% 38%
Cut immigration to make housing more affordable 57% 28% 53% 34% 69% 19%
Reform the Senate to reduce the power of small parties. 41% 34% 39% 38% 57% 24%

 

Reference to Tony Abbott Total agree Total disagree   Labor voters agree Labor voters disagree LNP Voters agree LNP voters disagree
Abolish subsidies for renewables and cut renewable energy targets to reduce household power bills 47% 33% 44% 36% 57% 28%
Abolish the Human Rights Commission to allow more free speech 39% 43% 32% 53% 46% 45%
Stop all new government spending to reduce future debt 51% 35% 42% 47% 62% 27%
Cut immigration to make housing more affordable 57% 31% 49% 41% 63% 30%
Reform the Senate to reduce the power of small parties. 41% 37% 34% 40% 59% 26%

Federal voting intention

Feb 28, 2017

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   Last week 21/2/17 2 weeks ago 14/2/17 4 weeks ago 31/1/17   Election 2 Jul 16
Liberal 34% 33% 34% 32%
National 3% 3% 3% 3%
Total Liberal/National 37%   36% 36% 35%   42.0%
Labor 37%   34% 35% 37%   34.7%
Greens 9% 10% 9% 9% 10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 3% 4% 3% 3%
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 9% 10% 10% 10%
Other/Independent 6% 6% 6% 6% 13.1%
2 party preferred
Liberal National 47%   48% 48% 46%   50.4%
Labor 53%   52% 52% 54%   49.6%
  1. Sample = 1,799. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Attributes of Malcolm Turnbull

Feb 28, 2017

Q. Which of the following describe your opinion of the Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull?

  Total   Sep 2016   Difference
Intelligent 72% 75% -3
Out of touch with ordinary people 65% 65%
Hard-working 61% 61%
Arrogant 56% 56%
Superficial 52% 50% +2
A capable leader 50% 51% -1
Narrow-minded 48% 45% +3
Good in a crisis 44% 47% -3
Understands the problems facing Australia 44% 46% -2
Intolerant 39% 37% +2
Trustworthy 36% 39% -3
More honest than most politicians 34% 37% -3
Erratic 34% 36% -2
Aggressive 31%   31%  
Visionary 30% 35% -5

Malcolm Turnbull’s key attributes were intelligent (72%), out of touch with ordinary people (65%), hard working (61%) and arrogant (56%).

There have only been small changes in perceptions since September. The main changes have been for visionary (down 5%), narrow-minded (up 3%) and intelligent, good in a crisis, trustworthy and more honest than most politicians (all down 3%).

Leader attributes – Bill Shorten

Feb 28, 2017

Q. Which of the following describe your opinion of the Opposition Leader, Bill Shorten?

  Total   Sep 2016   Change
Hard working 61%   61%  
Intelligent 60%   59%   +1
Understands the problems facing Australia 48%   49%   -1
Out of touch with ordinary people 47%   46%   +1
Superficial 46%   45%   +1
Arrogant 44%   44%  
A capable leader 43%   45%   -2
Narrow-minded 42%   42%  
Erratic 38%   39%   -1
Good in a crisis 37%   39%   -2
Intolerant 36%   33%   +3
Aggressive 35%   36%   -1
Trustworthy 32%   32%  
Visionary 29%   32%   -3
More honest than most politicians 29%   29%  

Bill Shorten’s key attributes were hard working (61%), intelligent (60%) and understands the problems facing Australia (48%).

There have only been small changes in perceptions since September. The main changes have been for intolerant (up 3%) and visionary (down 3%).

Leader attributes – comparisons

Feb 28, 2017
  Malcolm Turnbull Bill Shorten   Difference
Out of touch with ordinary people 65% 47% +18
Intelligent 72% 60% +12
Arrogant 56% 44% +12
A capable leader 50% 43% +7
Good in a crisis 44% 37% +7
Superficial 52% 46% +6
Narrow-minded 48% 42% +6
More honest than most politicians 34% 29% +5
Trustworthy 36% 32% +4
Intolerant 39% 36% +3
Visionary 30% 29% +1
Hard-working 61% 61%
Understands the problems facing Australia 44% 48% -4
Erratic 34% 38% -4
Aggressive 31% 35% -4

Compared to Bill Shorten, Malcolm Turnbull is more likely to be considered out of touch with ordinary people (+18), intelligent (+12%), arrogant (+12), a capable leader (+7) and good in a crisis (+7).

Negative gearing

Feb 28, 2017

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of property investors receiving tax deductions if the cost of buying and maintaining their investment properties is more than the revenue they receive from them (called negative gearing)?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   March 2016 May 2016
Total approve 44%   34% 62% 30% 41%   41% 43%
Total disapprove 35%   45% 23% 57% 39%   37% 36%
Strongly approve 16%   10% 23% 8% 20%   13% 14%
Approve 28%   24% 39% 22% 21%   28% 29%
Disapprove 18%   21% 14% 23% 23%   23% 22%
Strongly disapprove 17%   24% 9% 34% 16%   14% 14%
Don’t know 21%   21% 15% 13% 20%   22% 21%

 

44% approve of negative gearing and 35% disapprove. This is much the same result as when this question was asked in May last year.

Those most likely to approve were Liberal/National voters (62%) and those earning more than $2,000 per week (60%).

45% of Labor voters, 57% of Greens voters, 44% of those aged 55+ and 50% of those earing $600-1,000 per week disapproved.

Capital gains tax

Feb 28, 2017

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of property investors receiving a reduction in Capital Gains Tax on the profits made selling investment properties?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Total approve 37%   32% 52% 20% 35%
Total disapprove 41%   50% 31% 63% 46%
Strongly approve 13%   8% 16% 7% 24%
Approve 24%   24% 36% 13% 11%
Disapprove 23%   25% 22% 22% 29%
Strongly disapprove 18%   25% 9% 41% 17%
Don’t know 22%   18% 17% 18% 19%

 

37% approve of property investors receiving a reduction in Capital Gains Tax and 41% disapprove.

Those most likely to approve were Liberal/National voters (52%) and those earning more than $2,000 per week (55%).

50% of Labor voters, 63% of Greens voters, 55% of those aged 55+ and 58% of those earing $600-1,000 per week disapproved.

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