Budget and cuts to spending

Apr 12, 2010

 Q. If cost savings need to be made in the budget, in which area should spending cuts be made?

  %
Defence and national security 20%
Social security and welfare 15%
Industry and employment 7%
Community services 6%
Infrastructure, transport and energy 4%
Health 3%
Education 2%
None of these 32%
Don’t know 11%

20% of people think that if savings need to be made in the budget, cuts should be made to defence and national security, 15% think cuts should be made to social security and welfare and 7% think that cuts should be made to industry and employment. There is little support for cuts to health (3%) or education (2%).  32% think that cuts should be made to none of the areas listed. 

Green (38%) and Labor (25%) voters were more likely to support cuts to defence and national security.  Coalition voters were more likely to support cuts to social security and welfare (20%) and community services (9%).

People aged 18 – 24 (28%) year olds and 25 – 34 (26%) were more likely to support cuts to defence and national security.    Comments »

Budget expectations

Apr 12, 2010

Q. Do you expect that the budget will be good or bad for you personally, or will it have no impact on you?

  May 2009 April 2010
Total good 19% 11%
Total bad 38% 34%
Very good 2% 1%
Good 17% 10%
Bad 30% 27%
Very bad 8% 7%
No impact 21% 30%
Don’t know 23% 25%

 34% of people surveyed expect that the budget will be bad for them personally, 30% think the budget will have no impact, 11% think it will be good for them and 25% don’t know.

 Coalition voters were more likely to think the budget will be bad for them personally (48%), while Labor (36%) and Green (45%) voters were more likely to think it will have no impact. 

 People aged 55 years and over were more likely to think the budget will be bad for them personally. 

 Compared to the 2009 survey, the number of people that expect the budget will be good for them personally has decreased by eight percent and the number, the number that think it will be bad has decreased by four percent and the number that think it will have no impact has increased by nine percent.  Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Apr 6, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1900 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 36%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 39% 46%
Labor 43% 54%
Greens 10%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 7%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Federal Labor’s approach to asylum seekers

Apr 6, 2010

Q. Do you think the Federal Labor Government is too tough or too soft on asylum seekers or is it taking the right approach?

  %
Too tough 6%
Too soft 65%
Taking the right approach 18%
Don’t know 11%

Most people (65%) think the Federal Labor Government is too soft on asylum seekers, 18% think the Government is taking the right approach, 6% think they are too tough and 11% don’t know.

Labor voters were more likely to think the Government is taking the right approach (31%), Coalition voters were more likely to think the Government is being too soft (90%) and Green voters were more likely to think the approach is too tough (24%).  

56% of Labor voters and 25% of Green voters think the Government is being too soft on asylum seekers. 

18 – 24 year olds were more likely to think the Government is taking the right approach (29%), while people aged 55 years and over were more likely to think the Government is too soft on asylum seekers (76%).

Males were more likely than females to think the Government is being too soft (69% v 62%). 

When we asked a similar question in April last year, we found that 55% thought the Government was being too soft on asylum seekers, 26% thought the Government’s approach was about right and 4% thought the Government was too tough.  Comments »

Trust to handle issue of asylum seekers

Apr 6, 2010

Q. Which party would you trust most to handle the issue of asylum seekers?

  %
The Labor Party 23%
The Liberal Party 34%
No difference 28%
Don’t know 15%

 34% of people trust the Liberal Party most to handle the issue of asylum seekers and 23% trust the Labor Party more.   28% think there is no difference and 15% don’t know. 

Results followed party lines – Labor voters were more likely to trust Labor (46%) and Coalition voters were more likely to trust Liberal most (77%).  Green voters were more likely to trust Labor when it comes to handling the issue of asylum seekers (38%). 

34% of Labor voters think there is no difference when it comes to which party they trust to handle the issue.

People aged 55 years and over were more likely to trust the Liberal party to handle the issue (49%), while those aged 18 – 24 were more likely to trust Labor (38%). 

 In November 2009, we asked people which party they think is best to handle the issue of asylum seekers.  We found that 23% thought Labor, 27% thought Liberal and 37% thought there would be no difference in terms of which party would be best to handle the issue.  Comments »

Housing prices in Australia

Apr 6, 2010

Q. Thinking about housing prices, which of the following is mainly responsible for the increase in Australian house prices?

And which is the second most responsible?

  Main Second
Shortage of housing 33% 20%
Overseas buyers 19% 15%
Low interest rates 11% 15%
The first home buyers grant 8% 14%
Real estate agents 7% 10%
Australian investors 5% 10%
Bank lending 4% 11%
Don’t know 13% 4%

Most people think that a shortage of housing is mainly responsible for the increase in Australian housing prices, 20% think this is the second reason for the increase in house prices.  

19% point to overseas buyers as being mainly responsible for the increase in Australian house prices, 15% think this is the second reason. 

Coalition voters were more likely to think overseas buyers are mainly responsible for the increase in Australian house prices (22%), while Green voters were more likely to think Australian investors are mainly responsible. 

People aged 35 – 44 were more likely to think low interest rates are most responsible (17%), people aged 45 – 54 think a shortage of housing is most responsible (40%), while those aged 65 years and over think that overseas buyers are most responsible for the increase in housing prices (26%). 

Females more likely to indicate overseas buyers are mainly responsible (23%), while males were more likely to point to a shortage of housing as mainly responsible for increased house prices (39%).  Comments »

House prices in Australia

Apr 6, 2010

Q. Do you personally want house prices to increase, decrease or stay the same?

  %
Increase 28%
Decrease 34%
Stay the same 28%
Don’t know 9%

34% of people surveyed want house prices to decrease, 28% want prices to increase, 28% want house prices to stay the same and 9% don’t know.

Coalition voters were more likely to want house prices to increase (36%) while Green voters were more likely to indicate they want house prices to decrease (49%). 

People aged 18 – 24 were more likely to want house prices to decrease (56%), those aged 25 – 34 were more likely to want house prices to increase (37%) and those aged 55 years and over were more likely to want prices to stay the same (40%).  Comments »

Issues related to workplace staffing

Apr 6, 2010

Q. Over the last 12 months, has the business you work for cut back on staff, increased staff or have staffing levels stayed much the same?

  %
Increased staff 13%
Cut back on staff 26%
Stayed much the same 57%
Don’t know 4%

N=532

Only asked to those in employment

For those currently employed, over half (57%) indicated that staffing levels have stayed much the same at their place of employment. 26% indicated that over the past 12 months, the business they work for has cut back on staff, 13% indicated that staffing levels have increased and 4% don’t know.

There were no significant differences in terms of public or private workplaces; however people employed in the public sector were slightly more likely than those in the private sector to indicate there has been a cut back on staff in their workplace (29% v 25%).  Comments »

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