Opinion of Newstart

Jun 5, 2018

Q.The Newstart benefit for a single person with no children is about $270 per week. Do you think it is too high, too low or about right?

 
Total
 
Aged 18-34
Aged 35-54
Aged 55+
Vote Labor
Vote Lib/Nat
Vote Greens
Vote other
Inc. less than $600 pw
Inc. $600
-$1,000 pw
Inc. $1,000
-$1,500 pw
Inc. $1,500
-$2,000pw
Inc. more than $2,000 pw
Too high 9% 14% 8% 6% 6% 12% 4% 12% 4% 4% 10% 11% 15%
Too low 50% 45% 50% 56% 63% 36% 59% 50% 58% 66% 50% 50% 39%
About right 26% 30% 24% 24% 22% 35% 28% 24% 26% 17% 27% 26% 34%
Don’t know 15% 11% 18% 14% 9% 17% 9% 14% 11% 13% 14% 13% 13%

50% think that the Newstart benefit is too low, 26% think it is about right and 9% think it is too high.

Those most likely to think it is too low were Labor voters (63%), Greens voters (59%) and incomes under $1,000 pw (62%).

Those most likely to think it is too high or about right were Liberal National voters (47%), aged 18-34 (44%) and incomes over $2,000 pw (49%).

Statements about Newstart

Jun 5, 2018

Q. Do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

  Total agree Total disagree Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
The Government’s has a responsibility to ensure every Australian has enough money to put a roof over their head and food on their table. 77% 16% 35% 42% 13% 3% 7%
In Australia, no one should go without basic essentials like food, healthcare, transport and power. 92% 5% 48% 44% 4% 1% 4%
I support an increase in Newstart, the benefit paid to unemployed people, as it has not been increased in real terms for 24 years. 68% 19% 33% 35% 13% 6% 13%
A fair government would raise the rate of Newstart, Youth Allowance and related payments to ensure everybody has enough to live on while they look for paid work. 70% 20% 33% 37% 14% 6% 11%
A responsible government would increase Newstart payments by a minimum of $10 a day to ensure every person can afford a roof over their head and food on the table 64% 21% 32% 32% 15% 6% 15%

Minimum income

Jun 5, 2018

Q. Thinking about yourself personally, what is the minimum you could comfortably live on per week (including rent/mortgage, food, energy and clothing)

  Total Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+ Inc. less than $600 pw Inc. $600-
$1,000 pw
Inc. $1,000-
$1,500 pw
Inc. $1,500-
$2,000pw
Inc. more than $2,000 pw
Less than $300 per week 6% 10% 4% 6% 9% 5% 3% 10% 7%
$300-$400 per week 14% 18% 10% 15% 22% 11% 12% 9% 13%
$400-$500 per week 19% 19% 15% 24% 25% 26% 23% 18% 12%
$500- $750 per week 24% 21% 26% 25% 25% 28% 24% 29% 19%
$750- $1,000 per week 15% 14% 19% 12% 7% 18% 12% 16% 21%
$1,000- $1500 per week 7% 5% 9% 6% 3% 4% 11% 7% 11%
More than $1500 4% 3% 6% 1% 1% 3% 2% 8%
Don’t know 11% 10% 11% 11% 8% 7% 10% 8% 7%
Average $660 $600 $740 $595 $515 $610 $680 $640 $765

Federal voting intention

May 22, 2018

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   1 week ago 15/5/18 2 weeks ago 8/5/18 4 weeks ago 24/4/18   Election  2 Jul 16
Liberal 38%   34% 35% 35%    
National 2%   4% 3% 3%    
Total Liberal/National 40%   38% 38% 37%   42.0%
Labor 36%   36% 37% 36%   34.7%
Greens 10%   10% 10% 11%   10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 1%   2% 2% 2%    
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 8%   7% 6% 8%    
Other/Independent 6%   6% 6% 6%   13.1%
2 party preferred              
Liberal National 49%   48% 47% 47%   50.4%
Labor 51%   52% 53% 53%   49.6%

 

  1. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Preferred tax plans

May 22, 2018

Q. The Government’s budget proposes to provide a tax cut of $530 for middle and lower income earners from next year, and then in seven years change the tax rates so that workers earning between $40,000 and $200,000 pay the same rate of tax. Labor proposes to provide a larger tax cut of $928 for middle and lower income earners, and ask those in the top tax bracket to pay a little more to help reduce the deficit. Which of these proposals do you prefer?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
The Government proposal 33%   15% 63% 17% 28%
The Labor proposal 45%   75% 23% 62% 43%
Don’t know 22%   95 14% 21% 29%

 

45% prefer the Labor tax plan and 33% the Government’s plan.

All income groups except those earning $2,000+ pw strongly favour the Labor plan. Those earning more than $2,000 pw favour then Government plan 44% to 39%.

Preferred economic plans

May 22, 2018

Q. Which long-term plan for Australia’s economy do you most support?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Malcolm Turnbull’s plan to grow the economy by backing business to invest and create new jobs by cutting taxes for all Australian workers and businesses 38%   17% 72% 14% 38%
Bill Shorten’s plan to grow the economy by strengthening the middle class by investing in health care, education, infrastructure and tax cuts for middle and lower earners. 44%   73% 18% 73% 41%
Don’t know 18%   10% 10% 13% 21%

44% support the Labor plan for the economy and 38% support the Government’s plan.

All income groups except those earning $2,000+ pw strongly favour Labor plan. Those earning more than $2,000 pw split – Government plan 43% to Labor plan 42%.

Preferred spending cuts

May 22, 2018

Q. Would you support or oppose the following measures to cut Government spending?

  Total support Total oppose   Strongly support Support Oppose Strongly oppose Don’t know
Not providing company tax cuts for large business 60% 22%   26% 34% 15% 7% 18%
Tightening negative gearing and capital gains tax concession for investors 50% 24%   18% 32% 16% 8% 25%
Preventing income splitting in family trusts 42% 22%   14% 28% 16% 6% 35%
Limiting tax credits on investments to people who pay tax 42% 27%   12% 30% 18% 9% 32%
Cutting spending on government agencies like ASIC 36% 39%   11% 25% 26% 13% 24%
Cutting spending on the ABC 35% 45%   14% 21% 23% 22% 20%

 

There was majority support for not providing tax cuts for large business (60%) and for tightening negative gearing and tax concessions for investors (50%). Respondents were also more likely to support preventing income splitting in family trusts (42% support/22% oppose) and limiting tax credits on investments to people who pay tax (42%/27%).

They were split on cutting spending on government agencies like ASIC (36%/39%) and more likely to oppose cutting spending on the ABC (35%/45%).

Party trust to manage fair tax system

May 22, 2018

Q. Which party would you trust most to manage a fair tax system?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Mar 2018
Labor 32%   74% 9% 36% 16%   26%
Liberal-National 32%   4% 72% 13% 29%   28%
No difference 22%   13% 12% 36% 45%   31%
Don’t know 15%   9% 6% 15% 10%   15%

Respondents were evenly divided on which party they would trust most to manage a fair tax system. 32% favoured the Labor Party and 32% favoured the Liberal and National parties. 22% thought there was no difference.

Those earning less than $1,500 pw trust Labor more (34% Labor/27% Liberal-National), and those earning more than $1,500 pw trust the Liberals a little more (33% Labor/37% Liberal-National).

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