Federal budget impact

May 8, 2018

Q. In general, do you expect the Federal Budget, will be good or bad for the following?

  Total good Total bad   Very good Good Neither good nor bad Bad Very bad Don’t know Total Good (May ’17) Total Bad (May ’17)
People who are well off 55% 8% 27% 28% 26% 6% 2% 11% 44% 7%
Australian business 47% 8% 10% 37% 31% 7% 1% 12% 43% 8%
The economy overall 35% 19% 6% 29% 34% 15% 4% 12% 21% 24%
Average working people 24% 29% 4% 20% 36% 24% 5% 10% 12% 35%
Australian families 23% 31% 5% 18% 33% 24% 7% 11% 14% 36%
People of lower incomes 22% 43% 5% 17% 25% 27% 16% 11% 11% 48%
Older Australians 20% 24%   5% 15% 27% 28% 12% 12% 10% 45%
Younger Australians 19% 28% 4% 15% 41% 20% 8% 12% 11% 33%
You personally 18% 24%   5% 13% 47% 18% 6% 11% 10% 30%

 

55% thought that the Federal Budget would be good for people who are well off (up 11% from last year’s budget). 47% thought it would be good for Australian business (up 4%), and 35% thought it would be good for the economy overall (up 14%). Less than 25% thought the budget would be good for any another group – although for each group, respondents were more optimistic than last year.

18% thought the Federal Budget would be good for them personally (up 8% from last year’s budget), and 24% thought it would be bad for them (down 6%).

Important budget issues

May 8, 2018

Q. Which of the following areas do you think is most important for the Government to address?

 

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
More funding to schools and hospitals 28% 32% 26% 35% 21%
Supporting industries that create jobs 22% 19% 29% 13% 25%
Personal tax cuts 17% 16% 18% 11% 22%
Building infrastructure 12% 10% 15% 20% 9%
Fully funding the NDIS 8% 11% 4% 11% 14%
Don’t know 13% 11% 9% 10% 9%

 

28% thought that more funding to schools and hospitals was the most important area for the Government to address, 22% nominated supporting industries that create jobs and 17% wanted personal tax cuts.

Labor (32%) and Greens (35%) voters were more likely to prefer more funding for schools and hospitals while 29% of Liberal National voters nominated supporting industries that create jobs.

Personal tax cuts

May 8, 2018

Q. What is the lowest amount of personal tax cut that would make a difference to you and your family?

 

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Less than $15 per week 10% 14% 7% 14% 9%
At least $15 per week 10% 9% 13% 12% 11%
At least $25 per week 18% 21% 21% 13% 17%
At least $35 per week 12% 12% 16% 12% 11%
More than $35 per week 22% 22% 18% 20% 32%
Don’t know 27% 22% 26% 29% 20%

 

34% say that they would require $35 or more per week in personal tax cuts to make a difference. Only 20% say that a tax cut of $15 would make a difference – while a tax cut of $25 per week would make a difference to 38%.

48% of those earning $1,000-1,500 per week said a tax cut of $25 per week would make a difference compared to 36% of those earning more than $1,500.

Relieving stress

May 8, 2018

Q. Do you do any of the following things to relieve stress?

 

  Total   Men Women   Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+
Watch TV 57% 50% 64% 57% 57% 58%
Go for a walk 54% 50% 57% 54% 53% 54%
Listen to music 53% 51% 55% 60% 53% 46%
Exercise 39% 38% 39% 47% 36% 32%
Read a book 38% 32% 45% 32% 35% 50%
Spend time with friends 35% 26% 43% 41% 29% 34%
Eat chocolate 30% 21% 40% 40% 31% 19%
Have a drink 29% 29% 29% 30% 33% 23%
Do gardening 26% 23% 30% 16% 22% 43%
Meditation 17% 15% 19% 22% 15% 15%
Listen to radio/podcasts 14% 12% 16% 17% 14% 9%
Yoga 12% 11% 12% 24% 6% 5%
None of them 8% 9% 7% 7% 7% 11%

 

The most commonly reported ways to relieve stress were watching TV (57%), going for a walk (54%) and listening to music (53%).

Women were more likely to watch TV (64%), read a book (45%), spend time with friends (43%) and eat chocolate (40%).

Those aged under 35 were more likely to listen to music (60%), exercise (47%), eat chocolate (40%) and do yoga (24%).

Those aged 55+ were more likely to read a book (50%) and do gardening (43%).

Federal voting intention

Apr 24, 2018

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   2 weeks ago 10/4/18 4 weeks ago 27/3/18   Election  2 Jul 16
Liberal 35%   35% 35%    
National 3%   3% 3%    
Total Liberal/National 37%   38% 38%   42.0%
Labor 36%   37% 36%   34.7%
Greens 11%   10% 9%   10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 2%   2% 2%    
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 8%   7% 8%    
Other/Independent 6%   7% 7%   13.1%
2 party preferred            
Liberal National 47%   47% 48%   50.4%
Labor 53%   53% 52%   49.6%

 

  1. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Important issues

Apr 24, 2018

Q. Which of the following issues are the most important for the Federal Government to address over the next 12 months? Select up to 3. 

  Total   1st 2nd 3rd   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Cost of living 51%   22% 14% 15%   52% 44% 42% 57%
Improving our health system 36%   12% 12% 12%   40% 35% 32% 32%
Creating jobs and reducing unemployment 32%   13% 11% 8%   29% 33% 31% 36%
Housing affordability 29%   7% 10% 12%   29% 26% 28% 26%
Improving workers wages and conditions 22%   7% 8% 7%   29% 18% 20% 20%
National security and terrorism 21%   7% 8% 6%   14% 26% 10% 34%
Promoting economic growth 21%   7% 7% 7%   18% 31% 12% 15%
Tax avoidance by big companies 20%   5% 7% 8%   23% 16% 29% 21%
Promoting renewable energy 19%   7% 6% 6%   19% 12% 49% 13%
Income tax cuts 15%   4% 6% 5%   17% 15% 4% 11%
Reducing the budget deficit 14%   4% 5% 5%   7% 23% 4% 22%
More funds for education 13%   2% 5% 6%   15% 13% 28% 9%
Business tax cuts 6%   2% 2% 2%   4% 7% 6% 3%

The most important issues for the Federal Government to address over the next 12 months were –

 

  • Cost of living (51%)
  • Improving our health system (36%)
  • Creating jobs and reducing unemployment (32%)
  • Housing affordability (29%)

Labor voters were more likely to think Improving workers wages and conditions (29%) was important.

Liberal/National voters were more likely to think promoting economic growth (31%) and reducing the budget deficit (23%) were important.

Greens voters were more likely to think tax avoidance by big companies (29%), promoting renewable energy (49%) and more funds for education (28%) were important.

Other voters were more likely to think cost of living (57%), national security and terrorism (34%) and reducing the budget deficit (22%) were important.

Population growth

Apr 24, 2018

Q. Australia’s population has nearly reached 25 million and is growing by about 400,000 a year. Do you think Australia’s population growth rate is too fast, too slow or about right?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other   Apr 2013
Too fast 54%   53% 50% 44% 77%   45%
Too slow 4%   6% 4% 3% 1%   5%
About right 31%   31% 38% 44% 10%   37%
Don’t know 11%   10% 8% 9% 11%   13%

 

54% think that Australia’s population growth rate is too fast – up from 45% recorded 5 years ago. 31% think the growth rate is about right and 4% think it is too slow.

A majority of most voter groups believed the growth rate was too fast although Greens voters were divided 44% too fast/44% about right.

Immigration level

Apr 24, 2018

Q. Overall, do you think the level of immigration into Australia over the last ten years has been too high, too low or about right? 

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other   Oct 2016
Total too high           64%   62% 68% 35% 86%   50%
Total too low 5%   6% 4% 21% 2%   12%
Much too high 37%   34% 37% 17% 64%   28%
A little too high 27%   28% 31% 18% 22%   22%
About right 23%   24% 26% 37% 9%   28%
A little too low 4%   5% 3% 16% 1%   8%
Much too low 1%   1% 1% 5% 1%   4%
Don’t know 7%   7% 3% 8% 3%   10%

 

64% think that the level of immigration into Australia over the last ten years has been too high – up from 50% recorded in October 2016. 23% think it is about right and only 5% think it is too low. Over 60% of both Labor and Liberal National voters think it is too high.

57% of those aged under 45 think it is too high compared to 71% of those aged 45+.

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