Action on climate change

May 26, 2015

Q. In your opinion, do world leaders need to act to prevent the world’s population from being impacted by climate change?

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other/ Indep- endent

Yes, they need to act now, without delay

45%

56%

27%

79%

42%

Yes, they need to act in the next 12 months

10%

15%

10%

4%

7%

Yes, they need to act in the next 5 years

10%

9%

13%

4%

11%

Yes, they need to act in the next 10 years

4%

4%

6%

1%

4%

No, they don’t need to act

15%

6%

28%

5%

23%

Don’t know

16%

11%

16%

6%

14%

A majority (55%) think that world leaders need to act on climate change now or in the next 12 months. 14% think they need to act within the next 5- 10 years and 15% think they do not need to act at all.

While 71% of Labor voters think they need to act now or within the next 12 months, only 37% of Liberal/National voters agree.

Energy Sources

May 26, 2015

Q. Do you think Australia should put more emphasis, less emphasis or about the same emphasis as it does now on producing domestic energy from the following sources?

More emphasis

Same emphasis

Less emphasis

Don’t know

Sep 2014 More emphasis

Sep 2014 Less emphasis

Solar power

71%

14%

4%

11%

70%

3%

Wind

62%

20%

6%

12%

60%

8%

Hydro

55%

25%

4%

17%

46%

6%

Gas

22%

41%

20%

17%

23%

22%

Nuclear power

23%

25%

32%

21%

18%

41%

Coal

9%

25%

50%

16%

9%

53%

71% think Australia should put more emphasis on producing domestic energy from solar power and 62% think there should be more emphasis on wind power. A majority (50%) think there should be less emphasis on producing energy from coal.

There were few substantial differences since this question was asked in September, except for an increase for more emphasis on hydro power – up from 46% to 55%.

Renewables vs fossil fuels

May 26, 2015

Q. As far as you know, which energy source – renewable energy like solar and wind OR fossil fuels like coal and gas – is better for each of the following?

Renewable energy better

Fossil fuels better

No difference

Don’t know

Sep 2014 Renewable

Sep 2014 Fossil fuels

The environment

69%

5%

9%

17%

77%

5%

Electricity costs

47%

18%

11%

24%

45%

19%

The economy

42%

20%

11%

26%

39%

29%

Jobs

37%

20%

16%

27%

36%

25%

Overall, respondents think that renewable energy is better for the environment (69%), electricity costs (47%), the economy (42%) and jobs (37%). Since this question was asked in September, main changes are a decline for renewables being better for the environment (from 77% to 69%) and a decline for fossil fuels being better for the economy (from 29% to 20%).

There were few substantial differences across demographic groups – other than for electricity costs where 52% of women think renewables are better compared to 41% of men.

Liberal/National voters were more likely to think fossil fuels are better for jobs (30%).

Voluntary euthanasia

May 26, 2015

Q. When a person has a disease that cannot be cured and is living in severe pain, do you think doctors should or should not be allowed by law to assist the patient to commit suicide if the patient requests it?

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Sep 2010

Nov 2013

Oct 2014

Should be allowed

72%

76%

68%

83%

72%

69%

68%

66%

Should not be allowed

12%

12%

15%

1%

16%

14%

19%

14%

Don’t know

16%

11%

17%

16%

12%

17%

13%

20%

72% of respondents think that that doctors should be allowed by law to assist a patient commit suicide – up 6% since this question was asked last year. 12% think it should not be allowed – down 2%. This represents the strongest support for voluntary euthanasia over the past 5 years.

83% of Green voters, 76% of Labor and 68% of Liberal/National voters agreed that doctors should be allowed by law to assist a patient to commit suicide.

73% of women, 71% of men and 78% of those aged 45-64 support voluntary euthanasia.

Federal politics – voting intention

May 19, 2015

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,768 respondents

First preference/leaning to Election 7 Sep 13   4 weeks ago21/4/15 2 weeks ago 5/5/15 Last week12/5/15 This week 19/5/15
Liberal   37% 37% 38% 38%
National 3% 3% 3% 3%
Total Liberal/National 45.6% 41% 40% 41% 41%
Labor 33.4% 39% 39% 39% 40%
Greens 8.6% 11% 10% 11% 10%
Palmer United Party 5.5% 1% 1% 1% 1%
Other/Independent 6.9% 9% 9% 8% 8%

 

2 Party Preferred Election 7 Sep 13   4 weeks ago21/4/15 2 weeks ago 5/5/15 Last week12/5/15 This week 19/5/15
Liberal National 53.5% 48% 47% 48% 48%
Labor 46.5% 52% 53% 52% 52%

NB. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2013 election.

Handling of the Federal Budget

May 19, 2015

Q. Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the way the Liberal-National Coalition government is handling the federal budget?

  Total

 

  Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   May 2014
Total approve 34% 12% 75% 5% 19% 30%
Total disapprove 33% 55% 5% 71% 42% 52%
Strongly approve 8% 3% 19% 10%
Approve 26% 9% 56% 5% 19% 20%
Neither approve nor disapprove 26% 28% 18% 19% 34% 14%
Disapprove 19% 30% 4% 35% 29% 19%
Strongly disapprove 14% 25% 1% 36% 13% 33%
Don’t know 8% 4% 2% 5% 6% 4%

About one third (34%) of respondents approve of the way the Liberal/National Coalition government is handling the federal budget – up 4% compared to last year’s budget. 33% disapprove (down 19%) and 26% neither approve nor disapprove (up 12%).

Labor (55%) and Greens (71%) voters were far more likely to disapprove. Liberal/National voters were more likely to approve (75%).

Those on higher incomes ($1,600+ pw) were more likely to approve (42% approve/28% disapprove).

Economy heading in right or wrong direction

May 19, 2015

Q. Do you think Australia’s economy is heading in the right or wrong direction?

 

 

Total

 

  Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   May 2010 May 2011 Jun 2012 Apr 2013 Apr 2014 Aug 2014
The right direction 35% 19% 67% 9% 23% 51% 45% 43% 36% 39% 35%
The wrong direction 40% 58% 14% 65% 58% 25% 29% 32% 39% 34% 41%
Don’t know 25% 23% 19% 27% 19% 24% 25% 25% 25% 26% 24%

35% of respondents think that Australia’s economy is heading in the right direction and 40% think it is heading in the wrong direction. This represents no significant change since this question was asked last August.

19% (down 5%) of Labor voters, 67% (up 11%) of Liberal/National voters and 9% (down 17%) of Greens voters think the economy is heading in the right direction. 58% (up 4%) of Labor voters, 65% (up 11%) of Greens voters and 48% of those earning less than $1,000pw think the economy is heading in the wrong direction.

Confidence in Government to manage the economy

May 19, 2015

Q. Does this budget make you feel more confident or less confident in the Government’s ability to manage the economy?

  Total

 

  Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Total more confident 31% 15% 60% 9% 17%
Total less confident 31% 50% 7% 58% 34%
A lot more confident 7% 2% 16%
A little more confident 24% 13% 44% 9% 17%
Makes no difference 31% 32% 28% 27% 41%
A little less confident 14% 20% 5% 26% 17%
A lot less confident 17% 30% 2% 32% 17%
Don’t know 7% 4% 4% 6% 7%

31% say the budget makes them feel more confident in the Government’s ability to manage the economy and 31% say it makes them less confident.

31% say it makes no difference.

There were no substantial differences across demographic groups.

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