Importance of foreign aid

Jun 6, 2017

Q. In your opinion, how important is it that Australia gives foreign aid to the following countries and regions?

  Total very/somewhat   Very important Somewhat important Not very important Not at all important Don’t know Jun 2015 (very/somewhat)
Papua New Guinea 59% 17% 42% 16% 12% 13% 65%
Pacific island countries 59% 16% 43% 17% 11% 13% 66%
African countries 46% 11% 35% 22% 19% 12% 50%
South east Asia countries 45% 10% 35% 24% 17% 13% 50%
Indonesia 38% 9% 29% 24% 24% 13% 39%
Middle east countries 31%   8% 23% 26% 30% 13% 26%

 

59% thought that aid to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific Island Countries is very or somewhat important.

The proportion who think that aid to each region is very or somewhat important has dropped since June 2015 for each region except for the Middle East, which has gone up 5% to 31%. However, this region was still considered the least important to give foreign aid to.

Uluru Statement

Jun 6, 2017

Q. Last week the “Uluru Statement” was released, calling for a number of policy measures relating to Indigenous Australians.
Do you support or oppose the following measures?

  TOTAL Support TOTAL Oppose   Strongly Support Support Neither Support nor Oppose Oppose Strongly Oppose Don’t Know
Enshrining an Indigenous voice to parliament in the constitution 44% 14%   18% 26% 27% 7% 7% 14%
Negotiating a treaty between the federal government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. 43% 17%   16% 27% 27% 8% 9% 13%
Creating a treaty commission to negotiate treaties between various levels of government and different Indigenous language groups or tribes 39% 19%   15% 24% 28% 11% 8% 14%
Creating a truth and reconciliation commission 39% 18%   14% 25% 30% 10% 8% 13%

 

Each measure had greater support than opposition, with the most popular being enshrining an Indigenous voice to parliament in the constitution (44% support). Support was greatest for this measure among Greens voters (74% support), ALP voters (51%) and those with a University degree (52%).

 

More Liberal/National voters opposed than supported each of the four measures.

Reef versus Coal

Jun 6, 2017

Q. Adani’s proposed Carmichael Coal Mine is expected to create jobs in central Queensland, but may endanger tourism-related jobs due to potential damage caused to the Great Barrier Reef. Do you believe there is a trade-off between these types of jobs, and which do you think should be prioritised?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
There is a trade-off and jobs relying on the Great Barrier Reef should be prioritised 41%   47% 35% 60% 49%
There is a trade-off and jobs relying on the coal industry should be prioritised 12%   12% 18% 6% 7%
There is no trade-off between reef jobs and coal jobs 21%   17% 27% 14% 26%
Don’t know 25%   25% 20% 20% 18%

 

41% thought that there was a trade-off between Reef jobs and coal jobs, and that Reef jobs should be prioritised, while 12% thought that there was a trade-off and coal jobs should be prioritised. 21% did not think there was a trade-off.

Of those who thought there was a trade-off between Reef jobs and coal jobs, 77% thought that Reef jobs should be prioritised, and 23% thought that coal jobs should be prioritised.

Queenslanders were more likely than other states to think that there was no trade-off between reef jobs and coal jobs (26%).

Energy Policy

Jun 6, 2017

Q. Government energy policy attempts to minimize costs, ensure reliability and reduce emissions. Do you think one of these should be prioritised over the others?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Keeping the cost of energy down should be prioritised 28%   28% 33% 11% 33%
Reducing carbon emissions should be prioritised 21%   21% 15% 49% 16%
Maintaining the reliability of energy supply should be prioritised 19%   19% 22% 8% 28%
We do not need to prioritise – all can be achieved 21%   23% 21% 22% 19%
Don’t know 12%   10% 9% 9% 4%

28% thought that keeping the costs of energy down should be prioritised over reducing emissions and maintaining network reliability. This was the most popular option for Liberal/National voters (33%) and ALP voters (28%).

The most popular option among Greens voters was to prioritise the reduction of carbon emissions (49%).

South Australians were more likely than other states to prefer the reliability of energy supply to be prioritised (31%).

Federal voting intention

May 30, 2017

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   Last week 23/5/17 2 weeks ago 16/5/17 4 weeks ago 2/5/17   Election 2 Jul 16
Liberal 35% 34% 34% 35%
National 3% 3% 3% 2%
Total Liberal/National 38%   37% 37% 38%   42.0%
Labor 36%   37% 38% 37%   34.7%
Greens 11% 10% 10% 9% 10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 3% 3% 3% 3%
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 5% 6% 6% 7%
Other/Independent 7% 6% 6% 6% 13.1%
2 party preferred
Liberal National 47%   46% 46% 47%   50.4%
Labor 53%   54% 54% 53%   49.6%

 

  1. Sample = 1,783. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Asylum Seekers

May 30, 2017

Q. Do you agree or disagree with the following statements about asylum seekers and refugees?

  Total agree Total disagree   Strongly agree Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know Nov 2015 Aug 2016 Nov 2016
Asylum seekers should be deported to their country of origin if their asylum claims are unsuccessful 67% 12% 36% 31% 16% 7% 5% 6%
When the Manus Island detention centre is closed, those who cannot be safely relocated to another country should be brought to Australia 32% 40% 10% 22% 19% 15% 25% 8%
The government is too tough on asylum seekers 25% 53% 11% 14% 16% 20% 33% 5% 25% 21% 23%

67% thought that asylum seekers should be returned to their country of origin if their asylum claims were unsuccessful. Those most likely to think this were other party/independent voters (79% disagree), Liberal/National voters (79%) and those aged 65+ (78%). Those most likely to disagree were Greens voters (44% disagree), Victorians (18%) and those with a university degree (16%).

32% thought that asylum seekers and refugees who cannot be safely relocated to another country after Manus Island is closed should be brought to Australia. Those most likely to think this were Greens voters (69% agree), ALP voters (41%) and those aged 18-24 (37%). Those most likely to disagree were those aged other party/independent voters (54% disagree), Liberal/National voters (53%) and those aged 55-64 (52%).

25% thought that the government is too tough on asylum seekers, up 2% from when this question was last asked in November 2016. Those most likely to think this were Greens voters (68% agree), ALP voters (36%) and those aged 25-34 (35%). Most likely to disagree were other party/independent voters (75% disagree), those aged 65+ (71%) and Liberal/National voters (68%).

Role of Government

May 30, 2017

Q. Do you agree or disagree with the following statements about government?

  Total agree Total disagree   Strongly agree Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
I wish out political leaders would look for more common solutions, rather than just fighting each other 85% 2%   47% 38% 9% 1% 1% 4%
I’m sick of slogan from politicians – I want real answers on how government can operate better 82% 3%   44% 38% 11% 2% 1% 5%
Our government needs to find ways of working with the rest of the world, and not turning our backs on the world 59% 11%   19% 40% 24% 8% 3% 6%
It is harder than ever for governments to control the influence of multinational corporations 55% 14%   17% 38% 21% 11% 3% 9%
People have unrealistic expectations of the government’s ability to sort everything out 45% 26%   11% 34% 23% 18% 8% 5%
Most politicians are motivated by good intentions rather than self interest 22% 47%   4% 18% 25% 26% 21% 6%

The statement most likely to be agreed with was “I wish our political leaders would look for more common solutions, rather than just fighting each other”, of which 85% agreed. Those most likely to agree with this statement were those aged 65+ (96% agree), other party/independent voters (94%) and those aged 55-64 (93%). No more than 5% of any demographic group disagreed with this statement.

The statement most likely to be disagreed with was “Most politicians are motivated by good intentions rather than self interest”, of which 47% disagreed. Those most likely to disagree with this were other party/independent voters (71% disagree), Greens voters (65%) and those aged 55-64 (57%). Those most likely to agree were Liberal/National voters (32%), those who work full time (26%) and those with a university degree (25%). This was also the only statement which a greater proportion disagreed than agreed with.

Government Decisions

May 30, 2017

Q. Thinking about some of the major decisions the Federal Government has made over the years, do you think the following decisions have been good for Australia or bad for Australia?

  Total good Total bad   Very good Good Neither good nor bad Bad Very bad Don’t know Total Good (Oct 2016)
Compulsory superannuation 75% 5%   39% 36% 12% 3% 2% 8% 71%
Medibank (Now Medicare) 56% 14%   26% 30% 19% 9% 5% 11% 63%
Introducing the GST 43% 24%   11% 32% 24% 14% 10% 9% 46%
Free trade agreements 41% 16%   10% 31% 27% 9% 7% 17% 38%
Floating the dollar 37% 10%   10% 27% 27% 7% 3% 25% 33%
Reducing subsidies to car manufacturing 35% 25%   10% 25% 24% 17% 8% 16% 28%
Privatising Qantas 31% 29%   6% 25% 24% 19% 10% 15% 28%
Privatising Telstra 27% 39%   6% 21% 20% 23% 16% 13% 22%
Privatising the Commonwealth Bank 26% 34%   7% 19% 24% 19% 15% 16% 24%

The least popular government initiative was privatising Telstra, which 39% thought was bad. Those most likely to think this decision was bad were South Australians (57% bad), other party/independent voters (55%) and those aged 55-64 (53%).The most popular government initiative listed was compulsory superannuation, which 75% thought was good. Those most likely to think this decision was good were those aged 65+ (86% good), Liberal/National voters (85%) and Western Australians (82%). 11% of other party/independent voters thought compulsory superannuation was bad.

The largest changes since this question was last asked in October 2016 were for Medibank/Medicare, approval for which dropped by 7%, and reducing car manufacturing subsidies, approval for which increased by 7%.

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