Impact of national security ministry

Jul 25, 2017

Q. Do you think this new ministry will strengthen Australia’s national security, weaken our national security or make little difference?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Will strengthen national security 45%   36% 63% 27% 45%
Will weaken national security 8%   13% 5% 17% 5%
Will make little difference 28%   35% 21% 33% 29%
Don’t know 19%   16% 11% 23% 20%

45% think the new ministry will strengthen national security, 8% think it will weaken security and 28% think it will make little difference.

Those most likely to think it will strengthen security were Liberal/National voters (63%) and aged 65+ (54%).

Those most likely to think it will weaken security or make little difference were Labor voters (48%) and Greens voters (50%).

Concern about responsibilities of national security minister

Jul 25, 2017

Q. Are you concerned or not concerned that the minister, Peter Dutton, will have responsibility for all of these security services? 

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Total concerned 45%   57% 36% 69% 37%
Total not concerned 35%   28% 49% 13% 42%
Very concerned 17%   25% 8% 36% 14%
Somewhat concerned 28%   32% 28% 33% 23%
Not very concerned 24%   22% 32% 11% 24%
Not at all concerned. 11%   6% 17% 2% 18%
Don’t know 20%   15% 15% 19% 22%

 45% say they are concerned that the minister, Peter Dutton, will have responsibility for all of the security services and 35% are not concerned.

Those more likely to be concerned were Labor voters (57%) and Greens voters (69%).

Those more likely to be not concerned were Liberal/National voters (49%), and aged 65+ (50%).

Addressing climate change

Jul 25, 2017

Q. To address climate change, would you support or oppose setting a clean energy target (CET) which means that a set percentage of energy would have to be generated from clean sources (e.g. wind, solar, etc.)?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Total support 64%   73% 61% 87% 50%
Total oppose 10%   4% 16% 3% 10%
Strongly support 30%   35% 25% 56% 23%
Support 34%   38% 36% 31% 27%
Neither support nor oppose 18%   18% 19% 7% 23%
Oppose 3%   <1% 6% 1% 4%
Strongly oppose 7%   3% 10% 2% 6%
Don’t know 8%   6% 4% 2% 6%


Q. To address climate change, would you support or oppose establishing an emissions intensity scheme (EIS) – which means that pollution over a certain level would be taxed?

 

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Total support 54%   62% 50% 77% 44%
Total oppose 15%   9% 20% 7% 22%
Strongly support 23%   27% 16% 53% 22%
Support 31%   35% 34% 24% 22%
Neither support nor oppose 21%   20% 21% 12% 26%
Oppose 7%   4% 9% 5% 6%
Strongly oppose 8%   5% 11% 2% 16%
Don’t know 11%   9% 8% 4% 8%

Both policies for addressing climate change were supported by a majority of respondents.

64% support a clean energy target and 54% support an emissions intensity scheme.

10% oppose CET and 15% oppose an EIS.

Those most likely to support a CET were Labor voters (73%), Greens voters (87%), aged 18-24 (72%) and university educated (70%).

Those most likely to oppose a CET were Liberal/National voters (16%) and aged 65+ (25%).

Those most likely to support an EIS were Labor voters (62%), Greens voters (77%) and university educated (62%).

Those most likely to oppose an EIS were Liberal/National voters (20%), other party voters (22%) and aged 65+ (28%).

NBN connection

Jul 25, 2017

Is your home or workplace connected to the NBN?

  Total   Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+
Home connected to NBN 33%   32% 33% 30% 34% 34%
Workplace connected to NBN 11%   14% 8% 16% 12% 2%
Neither connected to NBN 50%   50% 50% 42% 52% 58%
Don’t know 10%   8% 12% 16% 9% 5%

40% of respondents say they are connected to the NBN, either at home or at work. There were no major differences across demographics.

Opinion of NBN Internet service

Jul 25, 2017

Q. Would you say that your NBN internet service is better or worse than your previous service in terms of speed and reliability?

  Total   Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+
Total better 48%   53% 42% 48% 59% 33%
Total worse 22%   18% 25% 16% 17% 31%
Much better 19%   20% 18% 12% 28% 17%
A little better 29%   33% 24% 36% 31% 16%
About the same 29%   27% 32% 32% 23% 35%
A little worse 13%   11% 14% 14% 10% 15%
Much worse 9%   7% 11% 2% 7% 16%
Don’t know 2%   3% 1% 2% 1% 1%

(Based on respondents with NBN connection – n=379)

48% think their NBN internet service is better than their previous service while 51% think it is about the same or worse. Only 19% think their NBN service in “much better”.

Federal voting intention

Jul 18, 2017

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

  Total   Last week 11/7/17 2 weeks ago 4/7/17 4 weeks ago 20/6/17   Election 2 Jul 16
Liberal 33%   33% 35% 35%    
National 3%   3% 3% 3%    
Total Liberal/National 36%   36% 38% 38%   42.0%
Labor 38%   36% 36% 35%   34.7%
Greens 10%   11% 11% 9%   10.2%
Nick Xenophon Team 3%   3% 3% 3%    
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 7%   7% 7% 9%    
Other/Independent 6%   6% 5% 5%   13.1%
2 party preferred              
Liberal National 46%   46% 47% 48%   50.4%
Labor 54%   54% 53% 52%   49.6%

NB. Sample = 1,830. The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Same sex marriage

Jul 18, 2017

Q. Do you think people of the same sex should or should not be allowed to marry?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other Oct 2015 Mar 2016 Jul 2016 Aug 2016 Jun 2017 Jul 2017
Should be allowed to marry 61% 72% 55% 74% 42% 59% 64% 58% 62% 60% 63%
Should not be allowed to marry 26% 17% 32% 18% 46% 30% 26% 28% 27% 26% 25%
Don’t know 13% 11% 13% 9% 12% 11% 10% 14% 12% 14% 12%

61% thought that people of the same sex should be able to marry and 26% thought that they should not. Women (66% support) were more likely than men (56%) to support same sex marriage. 81% of 18-24 year olds supported same sex marriage, compared to 46% of over 65 year olds. These results are similar to those of polling over the last few years.

Decision on same sex marriage

Jul 18, 2017

Q. How do you think a decision on legalising same sex marriage should be made?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other Should be allowed to marry Should not be allowed to marry
A vote in Parliament where politicians can vote according to their conscience or party policy 23%   28% 22% 39% 18% 29% 12%
A national vote which is binding on Parliament 50%   49% 54% 33% 57% 53% 56%
A non-binding national vote which is followed by a vote in parliament where politicians can vote according to their conscience or party policy 9%   9% 9% 11% 11% 8% 15%
Don’t know 17%   14% 15% 17% 14% 10% 17%

 50% of respondents want a national vote that is binding on Parliament, 23% want a vote in Parliament without a national vote and only 9% want a national vote followed by a vote in Parliament.

Those most likely to favour a vote in Parliament without a national vote were Greens voters (39%), aged 65+ (32%), university educated (29%) and those who support same-sex marriage (29%),

Note – previous poll questions were asked with 2 options – Should be decided by Parliament 29%, Should have a national vote 59%, Don’t know 12%. (last polled July 2017)

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