TRENDS: Who loves a nanny state?

May 7, 2012


Peter Lewis talks us through our love for a nanny state — as long as it doesn’t overstep the mark

The metaphorical nannies are out to control us; to mollycoddle and corrupt us; to intervene and suppress the free spirit in those of us who just want to puff on a ciggie or punt on a pokie or jump off a cliff because the other kids are doing it.

But while collectively we denounce a controlling nanny state, EMC polling shows that most of us actually like a designated grown up. Peter Lewis talks us through the details on 3Q.

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/3982400.html

Federal politics – voting intention

May 7, 2012

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,909 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

10/4/12

2 weeks ago

23/4/12

Last week

30/4/12

This week

7/5/12

Liberal

47%

45%

46%

47%

National

3%

3%

3%

3%

Total Lib/Nat

43.6%

50%

49%

50%

50%

Labor

38.0%

31%

31%

31%

29%

Greens

11.8%

11%

11%

11%

11%

Other/Independent

6.6%

9%

9%

9%

9%

 

2PP

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

2 weeks ago

Last week

This week

Total Lib/Nat

49.9%

57%

56%

57%

58%

Labor

50.1%

43%

44%

43%

42%

 

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election. These estimates have a confidence interval of approx. + or – 2%.

Comments »

The Australian Economy

May 7, 2012

Q. Thinking about the state of the world economy, how do you think the Australian economy has performed over the last few years compared to other countries?

 

15 Aug 11

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total better

70%

66%

80%

60%

73%

Total worse

10%

15%

8%

19%

10%

A lot better

31%

29%

49%

19%

38%

A little better

39%

37%

31%

41%

35%

About the same

16%

16%

12%

20%

17%

A little worse

7%

9%

6%

10%

8%

A lot worse

3%

6%

2%

9%

2%

Don’t know

3%

3%

1%

1%

1%

66% think that Australia’s economy has performed better than other countries over the last few years, 16% say about the same and 15% think it has been worse. This represents a shift from net +60 to net +51 since this question was previous asked in August last year.

There were no substantial differences across demographic groups although those on higher incomes are a little more likely to believe it has performed better – 71% of those on incomes over $1,600pw compared to 61% of those earning under $1,000pw.

Comments »

Trust to deal with GFC

May 7, 2012

Q. If there was another Global Financial Crisis, which party would you trust most to deal with it?

 

15 Aug 11

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

The Labor Party

31%

25%

68%

2%

42%

The Liberal Party

40%

42%

5%

83%

5%

No difference

20%

23%

19%

11%

39%

Don’t know

9%

10%

8%

4%

14%

If there was another GFC, 42% would trust the Liberal Party more to handle it and 25% would trust the Labor Party more. This represents a shift to the Liberal Party from net +9% to net +17%

The Liberal Party was rated higher than Labor with all demographic groups. Those most likely to trust the Liberal Party more were men (47%), aged 55+ (48%), full-time workers (50%) and income over $1,600 pw (50%).

Comments »

The Economy

May 7, 2012

Q. Over the next 12 months do you think economic conditions in Australia will get better, get worse or stay much the same?  

 

1 Dec

08

15 Jun 09

5 Oct

09

28 Jun

10

18 Oct

10

4 April

11

4 Jul

11

3 Oct

11

26 Mar 12

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total better

21%

43%

66%

33%

40%

27%

22%

16%

25%

23%

39%

18%

22%

Total worse

61%

37%

15%

31%

30%

37%

49%

58%

46%

46%

31%

59%

30%

Get a lot better

2%

5%

8%

5%

6%

4%

3%

2%

3%

2%

7%

1%

1%

Get a little better

19%

38%

58%

28%

34%

23%

19%

14%

22%

21%

32%

17%

21%

Get a little worse

45%

28%

11%

23%

20%

27%

31%

41%

31%

31%

27%

37%

22%

Get a lot worse

16%

9%

4%

8%

10%

10%

18%

17%

15%

15%

4%

22%

8%

Stay much the same

13%

17%

15%

30%

24%

27%

25%

22%

21%

25%

28%

19%

41%

No opinion

5%

3%

4%

7%

6%

8%

4%

4%

7%

6%

2%

3%

8%

Confidence in the economic outlook has shown little change since March.  The percentage of respondents believing conditions to be getting better declined 2 points to 23%, while those believing that economic conditions will get worse over the next 12 months remained at 46%.

Labor voters are optimistic overall – 39% better/31% worse.  Coalition voters are the most pessimistic, with 59% believing that thing will get worse over the next 12 months and only 18% better.

There was little difference across demographic groups.

Comments »

Politicians Accused of an Offence

May 7, 2012

Q. In general, if a politician is accused of an offence, do you think they should stand down from the positions they hold or should they be allowed to continue in their positions until a decision is made about their guilt or innocence?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Should stand down from their positions

62%

50%

73%

46%

Should be allowed to continue in their positions

27%

41%

20%

39%

Don’t know

10%

9%

8%

15%

62% think that if a politician is accused of an offence, they should stand down from the positions they hold and 27% think should they be allowed to continue in their positions until a decision is made about their guilt or innocence.

All demographic and voter groups were more likely to think they should stand down – although Labor (41%) and Greens (39%) voters recorded the highest support for allowing them to continue. Older respondents were more likely to think they should stand down – those aged 55+ split 72% stand down/23% continue and those aged 18-34 split 51% stand down/36% continue.

Comments »

Bank Regulation

May 7, 2012

Q. Thinking about banks in Australia, would you support or oppose the Government taking the following actions on banking?

 

Total support

Total oppose

Strongly support

Support

Oppose

Strongly oppose

Don’t know

Establishing a Government-owned bank

55%

23%

21%

34%

15%

8%

22%

Only permitting banks to change interest rates in line with Reserve Bank rates.

74%

16%

37%

37%

11%

5%

10%

Capping bank CEO’s salaries.

81%

12%

55%

26%

9%

3%

7%

Ensuring bank fees are not higher than the actual cost of the service

90%

5%

64%

26%

4%

1%

5%

Imposing a super profits tax on banks (like the mining tax)

59%

21%

34%

25%

16%

5%

20%

 

A majority of respondents supported all listed actions on banking. In particular, 90% supported regulating bank fees, 81% supported capping CEO salaries and 74% supported making banks pass on Reserve Bank interest rate changes.

There was majority support for all actions from both Labor and Liberal/National voters – although support tended to be stronger from Labor voters.

Comments »

Downloading from the Internet

May 7, 2012

Q. Do you or does anyone in your household download films, music or television shows via the internet for free?

 

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

Income <$600pw

Income $600 –

1,000pw

Income $1,000 –

1,600pw

Income $1,600+

pw

Yes

32%

34%

31%

48%

28%

19%

26%

30%

33%

40%

No

61%

60%

62%

42%

66%

76%

72%

63%

61%

54%

Don’t know

7%

7%

8%

10%

7%

5%

3%

7%

6%

6%

32% of respondents said they download films, music or television shows via the internet for free.

Those most likely to download were aged under 35 (48%) and those on higher incomes (40% of respondents on $1,600+ pw).

Comments »

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