Climate change

Jan 21, 2014

Q. Do you believe that there is fairly conclusive evidence that climate change is happening and caused by human activity or do you believe that the evidence is still not in and we may just be witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate which happens from time to time?

 

Nov 09

Dec 10

Jun 11

Oct 12

Oct 13

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Climate change is happening and is caused by human activity

53%

45%

50%

48%

52%

51%

70%

29%

80%

46%

We are just witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate

34%

36%

39%

39%

36%

39%

22%

61%

10%

41%

Don’t know

13%

19%

12%

13%

12%

11%

8%

10%

10%

12%

51% agree that climate change is happening and is caused by human activity and 39% believe that we may just be witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate. This is a similar result to when this question was previously asked in October last year.

By age groups, those aged under 35 split 55%/32% and those aged 55+ split 43%/48%. People with higher education were more likely to think climate change is happening and is caused by human activity – those with university degrees split 59%/29%.

Federal politics – voting intention

Jan 21, 2013

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,861 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

21 Aug 10

Last week ago

14/1/13

This week

21/01/13

Liberal

44%

44%

National

4%

4%

Total Lib/Nat

43.6%

48%

48%

Labor

38.0%

36%

36%

Greens

11.8%

8%

9%

Other/Independent

6.6%

8%

8%

 

2PP

Election

21 Aug 10

Last week

This week

Total Lib/Nat

49.9%

54%

54%

Labor

50.1%

46%

46%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election. These estimates have a confidence interval of approx. plus or minus 2-3%.

Unemployment benefits

Jan 21, 2013

Q. Do you think unemployment benefits are …

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Income less than $31,200

Income $31,200

$51,999

Income $52,000

$83,199

Income $83,200
+

Too generous

25%

18%

32%

21%

13%

18%

24%

35%

About right

30%

30%

34%

26%

30%

31%

31%

32%

Not high enough

33%

43%

24%

41%

51%

43%

32%

22%

Don’t know

11%

9%

10%

12%

6%

9%

12%

11%

33% think that unemployment benefits are not high enough, 30% think they are about right and 25% think they are too generous.

Those most likely to think unemployment benefits were not high enough were Labor voters (43%), Greens voters (41%), those on lower incomes (51% of those earning less than $600pw and 43% of those earning $600-1,000pw), not working (40%) and respondents aged 45-64 (47%).

Those most likely to think unemployment benefits were too generous were Liberal/National voters (32%), aged under 45 (31%), in full-time employment (33%) and income over $1,600pw (35%).

Welfare benefits

Jan 21, 2013

Q. Which of the following statements is closest to your view?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Income less than $31,200

Income $31,200

$51,999

Income $52,000

$83,199

Income $83,200
+

Australia’s current welfare system has created a culture of dependency, whereby many people, and often whole families, get used to living off Government benefits; the system needs to be radically changed to get such people to take more responsibility for their lives and their families.

53%

42%

67%

32%

40%

44%

47%

69%

Most people who rely on welfare benefits are victims of circumstances beyond their control. The benefits they receive are far from generous, and are the least a civilised society should provide in order to help them and their families avoid living in poverty.

30%

45%

20%

44%

42%

41%

36%

19%

Neither

10%

6%

8%

18%

11%

10%

9%

7%

Don’t know

7%

7%

6%

6%

7%

5%

8%

5%

53% agreed that Australia’s current welfare system has created a culture of dependency . . . . and 30% agreed that most people who rely on welfare benefits are victims of circumstances  . . . .

Those most likely to agree with the first statement were Liberal/National voters (67%), respondents on incomes over $1,600pw (69%) and full-time workers (61%).

Those most likely to agree with the second statement were Labor voters (45%), Greens voters (44%), not working (37%) and incomes under $1,000pw (42%).

Trust in industries

Jan 21, 2013

Q. How much trust do you have in the following industries to act in the public interest

 

Total a lot/some trust

A lot of trust

Some trust

Not much trust

No trust at all

Don’t know

Agriculture

72%

20%

52%

18%

4%

5%

Tourism

68%

12%

56%

22%

6%

5%

Manufacturing

56%

8%

48%

30%

8%

7%

Construction and development

48%

5%

43%

33%

12%

6%

Retail

47%

3%

44%

38%

12%

3%

Telecommunications

37%

3%

34%

41%

18%

3%

Banking

33%

5%

28%

36%

29%

3%

Mining

32%

3%

29%

35%

25%

8%

Media

30%

2%

28%

40%

27%

2%

Power companies

18%

1%

17%

37%

41%

4%

The industries most trusted to act in the public interest were agriculture (72% some/a lot of trust), tourism (68%) and manufacturing (56%).

The industries least trusted to act in the public interest were power companies (18%), the media (30%), mining (32%) and banking (33%).

The only industry on which there were major differences was mining where 43% of Liberal/National voters had a lot/some trust compared to only 25% of Labor voters and 17% of Greens voters.

Satisfaction with current job

Jan 21, 2013

Q. Overall, how satisfied are you with your current job?

 

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18
-34

Aged 35
-44

Aged 45
+

Income less than $31,200

Income $31,200

$51,999

Income $52,000

$83,199

Income $83,200
+

Total satisfied

71%

67%

77%

71%

75%

70%

73%

58%

74%

74%

Total dissatisfied

13%

14%

12%

13%

13%

13%

8%

16%

15%

13%

Very satisfied

30%

26%

36%

30%

31%

31%

21%

26%

30%

32%

Somewhat satisfied

41%

41%

41%

41%

44%

39%

52%

32%

44%

42%

Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied

15%

19%

10%

15%

12%

17%

19%

25%

12%

13%

Somewhat dissatisfied

9%

9%

9%

11%

8%

8%

8%

10%

9%

9%

Very dissatisfied

4%

5%

3%

2%

5%

5%

6%

6%

4%

Don’t know

1%

1%

*

*

1%

1%

*

71% of working people say they are satisfied with their current job while 13% are dissatisfied.

There were few major differences across demographic groups – women (77%) tended to be more satisfied than men (67%) and those on incomes of $600-$1,000pw were least likely to be satisfied (58%).

Choice of job

Jan 21, 2013

Q. If you had a choice, would you prefer to be –

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18
-34

Aged 35
-44

Aged 45
+

Income less than $31,200

Income $31,200

$51,999

Income $52,000

$83,199

Income $83,200
+

Working in a different occupation

30%

35%

24%

35%

25%

28%

22%

36%

36%

30%

Working in the same occupation but with a different employer

18%

18%

18%

19%

18%

17%

33%

9%

19%

18%

Working in my current occupation with my current employer

40%

33%

48%

35%

43%

43%

37%

44%

31%

44%

Don’t know

12%

14%

9%

11%

14%

12%

7%

12%

14%

8%

40% agreed that if they had a choice they would prefer to be working in their current occupation with their current employer.

30% would prefer to be in a different occupation and 18% would prefer a different employer.

Those most likely to prefer a different occupation were men (35%), aged 18-34 (35%) and those on incomes of $600-$1,600pw (36%).

33% of those earning under $600pw would prefer to be working in the same occupation with a different employer.

Employment by religious organisations

Jan 21, 2013

Q.  Should religious organisations be allowed to refuse to hire people who don’t live according to the organisations’ beliefs?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

Yes

34%

26%

42%

22%

34%

33%

35%

31%

37%

No

52%

58%

48%

63%

54%

51%

54%

50%

54%

Don’t know

14%

16%

10%

15%

12%

15%

11%

19%

9%

34% think that religious organisations should be allowed to refuse to hire people who don’t live according to the organisations’ beliefs and 52% think they should not.

Those most likely to think they should not were Labor voters (58%), Greens voters (63%) and respondents on lower incomes (57% of those earning less than $1,000pw).

Sign up for updates

Receive our weekly Essential Report in your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.