Action on climate change

May 26, 2015

Q. In your opinion, do world leaders need to act to prevent the world’s population from being impacted by climate change?

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other/ Indep- endent

Yes, they need to act now, without delay

45%

56%

27%

79%

42%

Yes, they need to act in the next 12 months

10%

15%

10%

4%

7%

Yes, they need to act in the next 5 years

10%

9%

13%

4%

11%

Yes, they need to act in the next 10 years

4%

4%

6%

1%

4%

No, they don’t need to act

15%

6%

28%

5%

23%

Don’t know

16%

11%

16%

6%

14%

A majority (55%) think that world leaders need to act on climate change now or in the next 12 months. 14% think they need to act within the next 5- 10 years and 15% think they do not need to act at all.

While 71% of Labor voters think they need to act now or within the next 12 months, only 37% of Liberal/National voters agree.

Climate change

Mar 24, 2015

Q. Do you believe that there is fairly conclusive evidence that climate change is happening and caused by human activity or do you believe that the evidence is still not in and we may just be witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate which happens from time to time?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Nov 09

Dec 10

Jun 11

Oct 12

Oct 13

Dec 14

Climate change is happening and is caused by human activity

54%

67%

37%

84%

38%

53%

45%

50%

48%

52%

57%

We are just witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate

31%

22%

49%

11%

45%

34%

36%

39%

39%

36%

29%

Don’t know

15%

11%

14%

5%

17%

13%

19%

12%

13%

12%

14%

54% (down 3% since December) agree that climate change is happening and is caused by human activity and 31% (up 2%) believe that we may just be witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate. Although this is a fall in belief in climate change since December, it is still the second highest recorded over the last 6 years.

By age groups, those aged under 35 split 62%/20% and those aged 55+ split 39%/51%. People with higher education were more likely to think climate change is happening and is caused by human activity – those with university degrees split 62%/25%.

Climate change

Mar 17, 2015

Q. The Intergenerational Report did not address the impact of climate change. Do you think addressing climate change should or should not be a priority for governments when it comes to intergenerational issues?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

Should be a priority

46%

61%

27%

87%

40%

Should not be a priority

33%

22%

53%

4%

38%

Don’t know

22%

18%

20%

9%

22%

46% think that climate change should be a priority for governments when it comes to intergenerational issues and 33% think it should not be a priority.

Those most likely to think it should be a priority were Labor voters (61%), Greens voters (87%), aged 18-34 (54%) and university educated (54%).

Those most likely to think it should not be a priority were Liberal/National voters (53%) and aged 55+ (46%).

Climate change

Dec 16, 2014

Q. Do you believe that there is fairly conclusive evidence that climate change is happening and caused by human activity or do you believe that the evidence is still not in and we may just be witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate which happens from time to time?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Nov 09

Dec 10

Jun 11

Oct 12

Oct 13

Sep 14

Climate change is happening and is caused by human activity

57%

70%

42%

87%

49%

53%

45%

50%

48%

52%

56%

We are just witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate

29%

21%

44%

3%

38%

34%

36%

39%

39%

36%

30%

Don’t know

14%

9%

14%

9%

13%

13%

19%

12%

13%

12%

14%

57% (up 1% since June) agree that climate change is happening and is caused by human activity and 29% (down 1%) believe that we may just be witnessing a normal fluctuation in the earth’s climate. This is the highest level of belief in climate change recorded in Essential polls – and the lowest level of disbelief.

By age groups, those aged under 35 split 67%/20% and those aged 55+ split 41%/48%. People with higher education were more likely to think climate change is happening and is caused by human activity – those with university degrees split 68%/22%.

Concern about climate change

Dec 16, 2014

Q. Over the last 2 years, have you become more concerned or less concerned about the environmental effects of global warming or do you feel about the same as you did 2 years ago?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Sep 14

Total more concerned

51%

62%

38%

78%

47%

52%

Total less concerned

9%

5%

16%

3%

9%

9%

Much more concerned

21%

31%

11%

40%

16%

22%

A little more concerned

30%

31%

27%

38%

31%

30%

About the same

35%

29%

43%

17%

43%

35%

A little less concerned

6%

4%

10%

3%

6%

6%

Much less concerned

3%

1%

6%

3%

3%

Don’t know

5%

3%

3%

3%

2%

4%

51% say they have become more concerned about the environmental effects of global warming over the last two years and 9% have become less concerned – 35% feel about the same.

These results are very similar to those when this question was asked in September.

Those most likely to have become more concerned were Labor voters (62%), Greens voters (78%) and people with university degrees (62%).

Countries doing enough on climate change

Dec 16, 2014

Q. As far as you know, do you think the following countries are doing enough, not enough or too much to address climate change? 

 

Doing enough

Not doing enough

Doing too much

Don’t know

Australia

26%

51%

6%

16%

USA

17%

53%

5%

25%

China

9%

63%

3%

25%

51% of respondents think Australia is not doing enough to address climate change – while 53% think the USA is not doing enough and 63% think China is not doing enough. Only 26% think that Australia is doing enough.

Those most likely to think Australia is not doing enough were aged 18-34 (57%), Greens voters (91%), Labor voters (65%) and people with university education (59%).

Right or wrong approach to climate change

Nov 25, 2014

Q. Do you think Australia is taking the right or the wrong approach to handling the issue of climate change?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

Taking the right approach

28%

13%

56%

4%

25%

Taking the wrong approach

42%

64%

14%

91%

36%

Don’t know

30%

23%

30%

6%

39%

28% think that Australia is taking the right approach to handling the issue of climate change and 42% think Australia is taking the wrong approach – 30% don’t know.

Those most likely to think Australia is taking the wrong approach were Labor voters (64%), Greens voters (91%), aged under 35 (48%) and university educated (46%).

Likelihood of extreme events

Nov 4, 2014

Q. Do you think that, over the next few years, Australia will be more or less likely to experience severe bushfires and extreme weather events like floods and cyclones?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Total more likely

63%

72%

49%

86%

65%

Total less likely

1%

1%

*

2%

3%

A lot more likely

33%

41%

19%

61%

31%

A little more likely

30%

31%

30%

25%

34%

About the same

33%

26%

47%

11%

29%

A little less likely

1%

1%

2%

2%

A lot less likely

*

*

1%

Don’t know

4%

1%

4%

1%

4%

 

63% think that sever bushfires and extreme weather events will be more likely over the next few years.

86% of Greens voters and 63% of Labor voters think they will be more likely. However, 47% of Liberal/National voters think they will be neither more likely nor less likely.

68% of women think they will be more likely compared to 56% of men.

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