Income of Football clubs in Australia

Oct 10, 2011

Q. Football clubs in Australia get their income in a variety of ways.  For each of the following, please indicate if you think it is good or bad source of income for football clubs?

Total Good Total Bad Very Good Good Bad Very Bad Don’t know
Merchandise sales 91% 4% 45% 46% 3% 1% 6%
Corporate sponsorship 90% 3% 45% 45% 2% 1% 6%
Raffles, auctions, competitions 89% 4% 38% 51% 3% 1% 6%
TV broadcasting revenue 87% 5% 37% 50% 4% 1% 8%
Philanthropic donations 76% 8% 29% 47% 6% 2% 16%
Property investment 76% 11% 24% 52% 9% 2% 13%
Poker machines in clubs 33% 57% 7% 26% 28% 29% 10%

Merchandise sales (91%), corporate sponsorship (90%), raffles etc (89%) and TV broadcasting revenue (87%) are regarded to be the better sources of income for football clubs in Australia.

By a difference of 11 points, philanthropic donations and property investment are also regarded as good sources of income by the vast majority of respondents (76%).

Forty three (43) points behind those sources of income are poker machines in clubs, making them the least well regarded source of income for football clubs by a large margin.  Whilst only 33% of respondents regard them as a good source of income, 57% see them as a bad source of income.

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Social Cost of Gambling

Oct 10, 2011

Q .From what you have read or heard, please select the sum of money from the list below that you think reflects the social cost of problem gamblers in Australia each year?

Total Support Pokies Reform * Oppose Pokies Reform
$10 million 7% 7% 9%
$100 million 19% 19% 22%
$1 billion 18% 20% 13%
$5 billion 14% 18% 9%
$10 billion 8% 11% 5%
Don’t know 33% 25% 42%
*Aggregate figures have been used for Support/Oppose pokies legislation by combining strongly support with support and strongly oppose with oppose.

The most common response amongst respondents was ‘don’t’ know’ (33%).   Out of the figures from which respondents could choose, the most common response was $100 million (19%) and $1 billion (18%).

Fourteen percent answered correctly, estimating the social cost to be approximately $5 billion[1].

Those who support the pokies reform are more likely to guess the social cost to be high with 18% estimating it to be $5 billion and 11% estimating it to be $10 billion.

Those opposed to the reforms were less likely to estimate the social cost to be high, with only 9% believing it to be $5 billion and 5% believing it to be $10 billion.


[1] Productivity Commission, Inquiry Report, Gambling, No.50, 26 February 2010.

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Politicians Lying

Oct 10, 2011

Q. Which statement best reflects your view:

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
When a politician makes a statement or commitment they should stick to it no matter what 17% 12% 21% 16%
As situations change, it is reasonable that politicians change their positions 47% 65% 36% 61%
Politicians almost always lie – it’s naive to think otherwise 36% 23% 43% 23%

The most common position taken by respondents is that ‘as situations change, it is reasonable that politicians change their positions’ (47%).   Labor voters are the most likely to adopt this position.

Thirty six (36%) of respondents took the view that ‘politicians almost always like – it’s naïve to think otherwise’, and Coalition voters are the most likely to take this view.

Only 17% of respondents felt that ‘when a politician make a statement or commitment they should stick to it not matter what’, with Coalition voters the most likely to adopt this view.

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Circumstances in which Politicians Lie

Oct 10, 2011

Q. In which of the following situations do you think it is acceptable for a politician to lie:

The most acceptable situation in which respondents condoned lying is ‘where an individual’s safety is concerned’ (43%) and ‘when the information impacts on national security’ (42%). Twenty four (24%) regard it as acceptable to lie ‘when the information impacts on the nation’s economic interests’ and 20% see it as acceptable to lie ‘when new information about a situation comes to hand’.

The most unacceptable circumstance in which a politician can lie is ‘where a change of position is required for political considerations’ (81% not acceptable).

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Federal politics – voting intention

May 16, 2011

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

sample size =1,871

First preference/leaning to Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago 2 weeks ago Last week This week
Liberal 43% 44% 44% 43%
National 3% 3% 3% 3%
Total Lib/Nat 43.6 47% 47% 47% 46%
Labor 38.0 35% 35% 35% 36%
Greens 11.8 11% 9% 10% 11%
Other/Independent 6.6 8% 9% 8% 7%
2PP Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago 2 weeks ago Last week This week
Total Lib/Nat 49.9% 54% 54% 54% 52%
Labor 50.1% 46% 46% 46% 48%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election.

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Interest in Federal Budget

May 16, 2011

Q. Thinking about the Federal Budget – how much attention did you pay to the Federal Budget?

2009 2010 2011
Total a lot/some 66% 53% 52%
Total a little/none 31% 44% 45%
A lot 29% 18% 19%
Some 37% 35% 33%
A little 25% 29% 31%
None 6% 15% 14%
Can’t say 3% 3% 2%

Just over half (52%) of respondents said they paid a lot or some attention to the Federal Budget. This is much the same as the corresponding figure of 53% for last year’s budget.

Those most interested were Liberal/National voters (64%) and people aged 55+ (63%). Only 42% of respondents aged 18-34 paid a lot or some attention to the budget.

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Perceived Impact of Budget

May 16, 2011

Q. Do you think the Federal Budget was good or bad for you personally?

Q. Do you think the Federal Budget was good or bad for Australian businesses?

Q. Do you think the Federal Budget was good or bad for the Australian economy overall?

You personally Businesses The economy overall
2010 2011 2010 2011 2010 2011
Total good 22% 11% 27% 20% 36% 27%
Total bad 26% 29% 32% 25% 28% 29%
Very good 3% 2% 3% 3% 6% 4%
Good 19% 9% 24% 17% 30% 23%
Neither good nor bad 33% 44% 9% 31% 10% 25%
Bad 18% 21% 22% 19% 18% 21%
Very bad 8% 8% 10% 6% 10% 8%
Don’t know 20% 16% 31% 23% 26% 20%

Overall there was a less positive response to the 2011 budget than to the 2010 budget. The main differences were that respondents were less likely to rate the budget good and more likely to think it was neither good nor bad. The proportions who thought it was bad were similar to last year.

44% of respondents thought the Federal budget was nether good nor bad for them personally – 11% said it was good and 29% bad. The only substantial differences by demographics were that 51% of respondents aged 55+ thought it was nether good nor bad.

25% thought the budget was bad for business, 20% good and 31% said it was neither. 35% of Labor voters said it was good for business and 45% of Liberal/National voters said it was bad.

Respondents were split over whether it was good or bad for the economy overall – 27% said it was good and 29% bad. Labor voters split 50% good/9% bad compared to Liberal/National voters at 12% good/51% bad.

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Economy Heading in the Right/Wrong Direction

May 16, 2011

Q. Overall, from what you have read and heard, do you think the Australian economy is heading in the right direction or the wrong direction?

Post budget 2010 Pre budget 2011 Post budget 2011 Vote Labor Vote Liberal/ National Vote Greens
The right direction 51% 45% 46% 74% 30% 46%
The wrong direction 25% 29% 29% 9% 49% 24%
Don’t know 24% 25% 25% 17% 21% 30%

Nearly half (46%) the respondents think that Australia’s economy is heading in the right direction – 29% think it is heading in the wrong direction.

This was a little less positive than the post 2010 budget poll, but unchanged from the poll taken before the 2011 budget – which suggests that the budget has had no impact on overall perceptions of the economy.

74% of Labor voters, 30% of Liberal/National voters and 46% of Greens voters think the economy is heading in the right direction.

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