Awareness of NDIS

Nov 4, 2014

Q. Have you heard or read a lot, a fair amount, just a little or almost nothing about the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

A lot

4%

6%

4%

4%

1%

A fair amount

15%

14%

16%

17%

19%

A little

37%

36%

43%

27%

35%

Almost nothing

35%

36%

30%

38%

40%

Can’t say

10%

8%

8%

14%

5%

 

19% have heard a lot or a fair amount about the NDIS – 72% say they have heard little or nothing.

This most likely to have heard about the NDIS were aged 65+ (27%).

Level of taxation

Mar 25, 2014

Q. Do you think the current level of taxation is enough for the Government to fund services such as the NDIS (National Disability Insurance Scheme) and the Gonski education reforms or will taxes need to increase to pay for them?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Current level of taxation is enough

47%

52%

48%

31%

50%

Taxes will need to increase

33%

28%

39%

43%

32%

Don’t know

20%

20%

13%

26%

18%

47% think the current level of taxation is enough for the Government to fund services such as the NDIS and the Gonski education reforms and 33% think taxes will need to increase.

Those more likely to think taxes will need to increase were Liberal/National voters (39%), Greens voters (43%),  aged 55+ (43%) and incomes over $1,600pw (39%).

Labor Party policies

Jul 8, 2013

Q. Under Kevin Rudd’s leadership, do you think the Labor Party should dump, change or keep their policies on the following issues?

 

Dump

Keep

Change

Don’t know

Handling of asylum seekers

21%

10%

51%

17%

Building the NBN

14%

50%

15%

15%

The mining tax

29%

30%

24%

18%

The carbon tax

39%

25%

23%

13%

The Gonski education reforms

15%

44%

16%

25%

The NDIS

7%

59%

9%

25%

Respondents were most likely to think the Labor Party under Kevin Rudd should keep the NDIS (59%), building the NBN (50%) and the Gonski reforms (44%).

51% think it should change the policies around handling asylum seekers and 39% think it should dump the carbon tax. Opinions were divided over the mining tax – 30% keep, 29% dump and 24% change.

Labor voters were most in favour of keeping the NBN (78%), the mining tax (47%), the carbon tax (39%), the Gonski reforms (67%) and the NDIS (74%) but favoured changing the policy on asylum seekers (56%).

Most significant political event

Dec 17, 2012

Q. What do you think was the most significant political event of 2012?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Implementation of the carbon tax

41%

40%

44%

52%

Rudd leadership challenge

14%

16%

14%

12%

Reopening asylum seeker detention centres on Manus Island and Nauru

9%

7%

11%

8%

AWU slush fund allegations against the Prime Minister

7%

1%

14%

Julia Gillard’s sexism speech in Parliament

6%

11%

2%

3%

Bipartisan support for National Disability Insurance Scheme

5%

9%

3%

4%

Australia winning a seat on the UN Security Council

5%

8%

3%

4%

Don’t know

13%

8%

8%

16%

41% think the most significant political event of the year was the implementation of the carbon tax and 14% think it was the Rudd leadership challenge.

All voter groups thought the implementation of the carbon tax was the most significant event.

Liberal/National voters were more likely to think the AWU slush fund allegations against the Prime Minister was most significant (14%) while Labor voters were more likely to think Julia Gillard’s sexism speech in Parliament was most significant (11%).

Most important reform

Nov 12, 2012

Q. The Federal Government are proposing to implement a number of reforms , which will require funding of billions of dollars. Which of the following reforms do you think is most important?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

National disability insurance scheme

16%

20%

16%

10%

Extra school funding recommended by the Gonski Review

31%

35%

28%

41%

Increased resources for aged care

29%

25%

37%

20%

Returning water to the Murray River

12%

12%

9%

18%

Don’t know

12%

8%

10%

9%

31% think that the Government’s most important proposed reform is extra school funding as recommended by the Gonski Review and 29% favour increased resources for aged care.

Extra school, funding is supported more by Labor voters, (35%), Greens voters (41%) and those aged under 45 (40%).

Increased resources for aged care is favoured by Liberal/National voters (37%) and those aged 45+ (42%).

Major spending initiatives of the federal government

Oct 2, 2012

Q. The federal government has recently announced a number of major spending initiatives on health, education and defence reforms that will involve substantial investment over the next few years.  For each of the reforms as they are described below, please indicate whether you believe it should be implemented or not

 

Implement the reform if it means higher taxes (including corporate and mining taxes) and cuts in other areas

Do not implement the reform if it means higher taxes (including corporate and mining taxes) or cuts in other areas

No opinion

National Disability Insurance Scheme to improve care and support for all people in Australia with a significant and permanent disability

58%

22%

20%

New dental health scheme to provide free dental care for low-income patients and children

53%

29%

18%

Gonski reforms to education to increase funding for each primary and secondary school student across the country

48%

30%

21%

Purchase of new advanced submarines for the Australian Defence Force

24%

50%

26%

The majority of respondents support implementing the NDIS (58%) and the new dental health scheme (53%) if it means higher taxes (including corporate and mining taxes) and cuts in other areas.

A large portion of respondents (48%) also agree with implementing the Gonski reforms if it means higher taxes and cuts in other areas, whereas 30% would prefer to see these reforms not implemented.

On the purchase of new submarines for the ADF, most respondents felt that this reform should not be implemented if it means higher taxes and cuts in other areas (50%), whilst 24% are in favour of implementing the reform.

Decisions of the Labor Government

Sep 10, 2012

Q. Thinking about the decisions the Labor Government has made over the last few years, do you think the following decisions were good or bad for Australia?

Total good

Total bad

Very good

Good

Neither good nor bad

Bad

Very bad

Don’t know

Expanding dental health services for people on low incomes

77%

5%

33%

44%

14%

2%

3%

5%

Increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,200

75%

4%

36%

39%

16%

3%

1%

5%

Increasing the age pension

70%

11%

30%

40%

13%

7%

4%

6%

Increasing superannuation from 9% to 12%

68%

9%

27%

41%

16%

6%

3%

6%

Protecting large areas of Australia’s marine environment in a network of marine reserves

67%

8%

28%

39%

20%

5%

3%

7%

Introducing the National Disability Insurance Scheme

58%

5%

21%

37%

23%

3%

2%

14%

Implementing the recommendations of the Gonski report to increase education funding

54%

8%

20%

34%

25%

5%

3%

13%

Stimulus spending to tackle the Global Financial Crisis (GFC)

54%

22%

22%

32%

18%

14%

8%

8%

Spending on new school buildings during the GFC

53%

22%

15%

38%

18%

12%

10%

6%

Paid parental leave

52%

20%

17%

35%

23%

12%

8%

5%

Introducing a tax on large profits of mining companies

49%

25%

24%

25%

17%

13%

12%

8%

Implementing the recommendations of the expert committee on asylum seekers including offshore processing

45%

15%

15%

30%

28%

8%

7%

12%

Building the NBN (National Broadband Network)

43%

28%

17%

26%

22%

14%

14%

7%

Abolished WorkChoices

42%

27%

23%

19%

19%

17%

10%

12%

Introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change

28%

51%

14%

14%

15%

16%

35%

7%

The two most popular decisions of the Labor Government are ‘expanding dental health services for people on low incomes’ (77% total good) and ‘increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,000 (75% total good).   The least popular decisions were ‘Building the NBN’ (43% total good), ‘Abolished WorkChoices’ (42% total good) and ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’ (28% total good).

Of the fifteen decisions put to respondents, the majority of respondents believed that 10 of the 15 decisions were good for Australia.  For the remaining 5 decisions, a larger portion of respondents generally regarded the decision to be good for Australia except for ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’, where the majority of respondents (51%) believed it to be bad for Australia.

Female respondents were more likely to endorse the dental health reforms (80% total good) compared with male respondents (74% total good).

Increasing the age pension was most strongly supported by respondents aged 65+ (77% total good).

Introducing paid parental leave was more popular with female respondents (57% total good), compared with male respondents (46% total good).  Looking at this decision by age, it was most popular amongst respondents aged 25-34 (62%) and 35-44 (62%) whereas respondents aged 65+ were the most likely to regard the decision as a bad one (36% total bad).

Implementing the recommendations of the expert committee on asylum seekers including offshore processing proved to be a very popular decision amongst respondents aged 65+ (65% total good), whereas respondents aged 25-34 were the most likely to regard it as a bad decision (43% total bad).

Female respondents were more likely to regard ‘protecting large areas of Australia’s marine environment’ as a good decision (72% total good) compared with male respondents (60% total good).

Awareness of NDIS

Aug 6, 2012

Q. Have you heard or read a lot, a fair amount, just a little or almost nothing about the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

A lot

5%

7%

4%

A fair amount

17%

20%

17%

25%

A little

33%

30%

34%

39%

Almost nothing

40%

38%

41%

30%

Can’t say

6%

4%

4%

6%

22% have heard a lot or a fair amount about the National Disability Insurance Scheme, 33% have heard a little and 40% have heard almost nothing.

Those more likely to have heard a lot or a fair amount were aged 55+ (31%), Labor voters (27%) and men (25%).

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