Whether asylum seekers are genuine refugees

Apr 14, 2015

Q. As far as you know, are most asylum seekers arriving by in Australia boat genuine refugees or are most of them not genuine refugees?

 

 

Total

 

  Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other   Jan 2014
Most of them are genuine refugees 32% 37% 26% 64% 27% 30%
Most of them are not genuine refugees 43% 40% 53% 16% 50% 47%
Don’t know 25% 22% 21% 20% 24% 23%

43% of respondents believe that most asylum seekers arriving by boat are not genuine refugees – 32% believe most are genuine refugees. This is a shift toward believing they are genuine since this question was asked in January last year.

Those more likely to think most are not genuine refugees were Liberal/National voters (53%) and aged 55+ (59%). Those more likely to think most are genuine refugees were Greens voters (64%), Labor voters (37%) and those with university education (42%).

Refugee intake compared to other countries

Nov 18, 2014

Q. As far as you know which of the following statements is true?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

Australia takes in fewer refugees than comparable nations

32%

40%

22%

60%

31%

Australia takes in about the same number of refugees as comparable nations

20%

18%

26%

12%

21%

Australia takes in more refugees than comparable nations

25%

25%

28%

8%

34%

Don’t know

23%

17%

24%

20%

14%

32% think that Australia takes in fewer refugees than comparable nations and 45% think we take in about the same number or more. 23% could not give an answer.

60% of Greens voters and 40% of Labor voters think we take in fewer – as did 45% of those with university education.

Statements about refugee intake

Nov 18, 2014

Q. Do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

 

Total agree

Total disagree

 

Strongly agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly disagree

Don’t know

Accepting refugees is something a wealthy nation like Australia should do to support poorer nations

49%

36%

15%

34%

23%

13%

14%

Refugees contribute to the nation that accepts them, it is in our interest to increase

39%

44%

12%

27%

27%

17%

17%

Australia’s overall population is too high, we need to wind back our refugee program

43%

40%

18%

25%

26%

14%

17%

Australia’s overall population is too low and we need to increase the number of refugees to boost the numbers in our workforce

20%

62%

4%

16%

31%

31%

17%

Nearly half (49%) agreed that accepting refugees is something a wealthy nation like Australia should do to support poorer nations. A majority (62%) disagreed that at Australia’s overall population is too low and we need to increase the number of refugees to boost the numbers in our workforce.

However, respondents were evenly divided over “Australia’s overall population is too high, we need to wind back our refugee program” (43% agree/40% disagree) and “Refugees contribute to the nation that accepts them, it is in our interest to increase” (39% agree/44% disagree).

Whether asylum seekers are genuine refugees

Jan 21, 2014

Q. As far as you know, are most asylum seekers arriving by in Australia boat genuine refugees or are most of them not genuine refugees?

 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Most of them are genuine refugees

30%

41%

18%

67%

24%

Most of them are not genuine refugees

47%

39%

59%

18%

54%

Don’t know

23%

20%

23%

15%

22%

47% of respondents believe that most asylum seekers arriving by boat are not genuine refugees – 30% believe most are genuine refugees.

Those more likely to think most are not genuine refugees were Liberal/National voters (59%), aged 45+ (55%) and those who had not completed secondary education (58%). Those more likely to think most are genuine refugees were  Greens voters (67%), Labor voters (41%) and those with university education (36%).

Approval of Recommendations on Asylum Seekers

Aug 20, 2012

Q. An expert panel appointed by the Federal Government has made a number of recommendations for handling asylum seekers arriving in Australia by boat. Do you approve or disapprove of the following recommendations?

 

Total approve

Total disapprove

Strongly approve

Approve

Dis-approve

Strongly disapprove

Don’t know

Expanding Australia’s humanitarian program immediately from 13,500 places per year to 20,000

42%

46%

13%

29%

20%

26%

12%

Limiting the ways refugees who have arrived by boat can bring their families to Australia

72%

18%

40%

32%

11%

7%

11%

Reopening detention facilities in Nauru and Manus Islands

67%

18%

36%

31%

11%

7%

14%

Detaining offshore refugees who have arrived by boat for several years

47%

39%

26%

21%

22%

17%

13%

Pursuing a people swap deal with Malaysia as the basis for a regional solution

30%

47%

11%

19%

22%

25%

23%

Consider turning back boats in the future but only if special conditions are met

66%

21%

35%

31%

11%

10%

13%

There was strong majority approval of the recommendations to limit the ways refugees who have arrived by boat can bring their families to Australia (72%), reopen detention facilities in Nauru and Manus Islands (67%) and consider turning back boats (66%). Respondents were a little more in favour of detaining offshore refugees for several years (47% approve/39% disapprove) and divided over expanding Australia’s humanitarian program (42%/46%). 47% disapproved of pursuing a people swap deal with Malaysia as the basis for a regional solution.

48% of Labor voters and 81% of Greens voters approved expanding Australia’s humanitarian aid but 54% of Liberal/National voters disapproved.

48% of Labor voters approved pursuing a people swap deal with Malaysia but 59% of Liberal/National voters disapproved.

45% of Labor voters and 81% of Liberal/National voters approved turning back boats but 56% of Greens voters disapproved.

Men favoured detaining refugees for several years (58% approve/31% disapprove while women were more likely to be opposed (38% approve/46% disapprove).

Support for Sending Asylum Seekers to Malaysia

Aug 1, 2011

Q. The Government has recently made an agreement to send asylum seekers arriving by boat in Australia to Malaysia for processing, and in return Australia will take a fixed number of refugees from Malaysia. Do you support or oppose this agreement?

16 June 11 Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total support 40% 31% 50% 25% 19%
Total oppose 39% 53% 31% 67% 60%
Strongly support 13% 6% 9% 4% 3%
Support 27% 25% 41% 21% 16%
Oppose 22% 23% 17% 24% 35%
Strongly oppose 17% 30% 14% 43% 25%
Don’t know 21% 16% 18% 9% 21%

31% support the agreement to send asylum seekers to Malaysia for processing and 53% oppose. This represents a significant increase in opposition to this scheme from that recorded 6 weeks ago – support is down 9% and opposition up 14%.

This shift is mainly due to changed opinions of Liberal/National voters. Support from Labor voters is up 3% to 50% while opposition from Liberal/National voters has increased by 22% to 67%. Opposition from Greens voters has also increased by 9% to 60%.

Comments »

Asylum Seekers

Jun 15, 2010

Q. Which of the following comes is closest to your view?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
All asylum seekers arriving in Australia by boat should be sent back to the country they came from even if they are genuine refugees 31% 26% 38% 22%
Asylum seekers arriving by boat should only be allowed to stay in Australia if they are found to be genuine refugees 59% 67% 56% 66%
All asylum seekers arriving in Australia by boat should be allowed to stay 4% 4% 2% 10%
Don’t know 6% 3% 4% 2%

59% agreed with the statement that “asylum seekers arriving by boat should only be allowed to stay in Australia if they are found to be genuine refugees” and 31% agreed that “all asylum seekers arriving in Australia by boat should be sent back to the country they came from even if they are genuine refugees”. Only 4% (including 10% of Greens voters) agreed that “all asylum seekers arriving in Australia by boat should be allowed to stay”.

Women were more likely to think genuine refugees should be allowed to stay (61% compared to 57% of men). 28% of those aged 55+ thought all asylum seekers should be sent back compared to 33% of those aged under 55. Comments »

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