Personal happiness

Dec 4, 2018

Q. Thinking about your own personal situation, do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

Total agree Total disagree Strongly agree Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree Strongly disagree Jun 2017 Agree
I am happy in my personal/family life 73%         10%         26%         47%         17%         7%         2%         79%
I am happy in my life overall 70%         10%         21%         49%         19%         7%         3%         74%
I am happy in my social life 66%         12%         19%         47%         22%         10%         2%         71%
I am happy in my spiritual life 56%         7%         18%         39%         36%         5%         2%         62%
I am happy in my work life 42%         17%         10%         32%         41%         12%         5%         52%

All but one statement (I am happy in my work life) received majority agreement. The area in which happiness was the highest was personal/family life, in which 73% were happy, while the area in which happiness was lowest overall was work life, in which 42% were happy.

People in WA were least happy with their work life (with 15% strongly disagreeing with the statement) and their lives overall (10% strongly disagreeing with statement).

All areas have seen a decline in happiness since 2017, with the proportion of people agreeing they are happy with their work life declining by 10%pts (from 52%) and spiritual life declining 6%pts.

Additional breakdowns of this question are on the following page.

Additional table

This table provides a cross-tabulation of the proportion who “very strongly” agreed with each statement across a number of demographics.

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Green Vote Other Male Female Earn <$78k Earn >$78k 18-34 35-54 55+
I am happy in my personal/family life 26%         25%         32%         20%         25%         26%         27%         21% 32% 25% 23% 32%
I am happy in my social life 19% 19%         22%         12%         22%         20%         18%         16% 22% 17% 16% 25%
I am happy in my work life 10% 9%         14% 4%         9%         10%         9%         7% 14% 9% 9% 10%
I am happy in my spiritual life 18% 15%         21%         17%         21%         17%         18%         16% 20% 16% 17% 21%
I am happy in my life overall 21% 21%         23%         17%         24%         22%         21%         18% 25% 19% 17% 30%

Liberal voters are more likely to strongly agree (14%) that they are happy in their work life, than voters of other parties.

Those with a household income of more than $78,000 are more likely to be happy in their life overall (25%), their personal/family life (32%), their social life (22%) and their work life (14%).

People aged 55 and over are more likely to strongly agree that they are happy with their life overall than those aged under 55 (30% vs. 19%).

Negative gearing – impact on house prices

Dec 4, 2018

Q. Property investors can receive tax deductions if the cost of buying and maintaining their investment properties is more than the revenue they receive from them (called negative gearing). Do you think restricting negative gearing to new homes will increase house prices, lower house prices or make no difference?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Lower house prices 24% 26% 27% 29% 17%
Increase house prices 21% 18% 24% 22% 22%
Make no difference 27% 29% 26% 18% 37%
Don’t know  29% 27% 23% 30% 24%

Just under a quarter of people believe restricting negative gearing would lower house prices (24%). 21% believe it would lead to increased house prices and 27% think it would make no difference.

People aged 65 and over are most likely to believe changing the laws regarding negative gearing would not impact house prices (35%).

Negative gearing – impact on rents

Dec 4, 2018

Q. And do you think restricting negative gearing to new homes will increase rents, lower rents or make no difference?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Lower rents 14% 20% 11% 12% 10%
Increase rents 37% 29% 49% 31% 41%
Make no difference 24% 28% 19% 26% 30%
Don’t know  26% 24% 21% 30% 18%

Labor voters are more likely than other voters to believe restricting negative gearing will lower rents (20%), whereas Coalition voters are more likely than others to this it will increase rents (49%).

Doing enough to address climate change

Dec 4, 2018

Q. As far as you know, do you think Australia is doing enough, not enough or too much to address climate change?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other Aug 2015 Mar 2016 Aug 2016 Dec 2016 Sep 2017 Oct 2018
Doing enough 24% 23% 32% 10% 24% 24% 21% 22% 22% 20% 23%
Not doing enough 53% 63% 42% 82% 53% 53% 57% 52% 49% 56% 56%
Doing too much 9% 3% 14% 1% 9% 7% 8% 8% 11% 8% 7%
Don’t know 14% 11% 12% 7% 14% 16% 13% 18% 18% 16% 13%

Just over half (53%) think Australia is not doing enough to address climate change. This has not statistically changed from October 2018.

Those people most likely to think Australia was not doing enough include women (58%), Greens voters (82%) and Labor voters (63%).

Dividend imputation

Dec 4, 2018

Q. When companies pay dividends to Australian shareholders out of after-tax profit, shareholders receive franking credits, which they can claim as a tax deduction. If the shareholder does not pay any tax, they receive a cash refund from the tax office. This system is known as “dividend imputation” and these cash payments cost the Government about $8 billion per year. The Labor Party has proposed to end the cash refunds for imputation credits. Taxpayers will still be able to claim a tax deduction. Do you support or oppose ending the cash refunds?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Total support 39%         50%         32%         49%         40%       
Total oppose 30%         22%         44%         21%         35%       
Strongly support 15% 22% 9% 19% 16%
Support 25% 29% 23% 30% 24%
Oppose 16% 15% 21% 14% 16%
Strongly oppose 14% 7% 24% 7% 19%
Don’t know 31% 28% 24% 30% 25%

Those most likely to support ending the cash refunds for imputation credits are aged under 34 (54%), Labor voters (50%), Greens voters (49%), full-time workers (46%), those with a household income of over $78,000 (48%) and those who are university educated (46%).

Those who are most likely to oppose the idea are aged over 55 (42%) and Coalition voters (44%).

Federal voting intention

Nov 20, 2018

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Q       Total   2 weeks ago

6/11/18

4 weeks ago 23/10/18   Election 2 Jul 16
Liberal 34%   33% 36%    
National 3%   3% 2%    
Total Liberal/National 37%   36% 38%   42.0%
Labor 35%   39% 37%   34.7%
Greens 11%   10% 10%   10.2%
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 7%   6% 7%    
Other/Independent 10%   9% 8%   13.1%
2 party preferred            
Liberal National 48%   46% 47%   50.4%
Labor 52%   54% 53%   49.6%

 

  1. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Firmness of vote

Nov 20, 2018

Q. How would you describe your choice?

 

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Very firm and unlikely to change 44%   50% 46% 42% 28%
Firm but it might change 37%   33% 39% 42% 36%
Not that firm at all and you might well consider another choice as things develop 17%   15% 13% 13% 32%
Don’t Know 2%   2% 2% 2% 4%

 

44% of those who gave a voting preference say their vote is firm and unlikely to change, 37% firm but might change and 17% not that firm. Other party voters are the least firm.

53% of those aged 45+ say their vote is firm compared to 36% of those aged under 45.

Liberal team

Nov 20, 2018

Q. How would you rate the Liberal Government’s team of Ministers?

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote Other
Total good 28%   13% 56% 15% 14%
Total poor 35%   55% 6% 51% 53%
Very good 5%   3% 8% 1% 3%
Good 23%   10% 48% 14% 11%
Neither good nor poor 31%   29% 34% 28% 29%
Poor 15%   22% 4% 17% 25%
Very poor 20%   33% 2% 34% 28%
Don’t know 7%   3% 3% 6% 3%

 

28% rate the Liberal Government’s team of Ministers good and 35% poor. 56% of Liberal/National voters rate them as good.

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