Addressing Climate Change

Mar 13, 2019

Q. As far as you know, do you think Australia is doing enough, not enough or too much to address climate change?

Total Male Female Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other Aged 18-34 Aged 35-54 Aged 55+ Dec 2018 Oct 2018 Sep 2017
Not doing enough 51% 43% 58% 64% 34% 79% 46% 58% 48% 48% 53% 56% 56%
Doing enough 27% 31% 23% 18% 43% 10% 28% 26% 26% 29% 24% 23% 20%
Doing too much 11% 16% 6% 8% 15% 2% 16% 8% 9% 15% 9% 7% 8%
Don’t know 12% 10% 13% 10% 9% 8% 10% 8% 18% 9% 14% 13% 16%

Just over half (51%) think Australia is not doing enough to address climate change. This has not statistically changed from December 2018.

Those people most likely to think Australia was not doing enough include women (58%), Greens voters (79%) and Labor voters (64%).

Mardi Gras

Mar 13, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about Sydney’s Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, which was held this past weekend?

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Unsure
The Mardi Gras parade shows the diversity of the LGBTIQ community in Australia and around the world 58% 18% 29% 30% 18% 6% 11% 6%
Mardi Gras is an important celebration of the LGBTIQ community in Australia 56% 19% 32% 25% 19% 6% 13% 5%
Mardi Gras helps me to understand the LGBTIQ community 37% 28% 17% 20% 30% 11% 17% 6%

Over half believe Mardi Gras celebrations show the diversity of the LGBTIQ community (58%) and that it’s an important celebration (56%). Over a third (37%) feel it helps understanding of the LGBTIQ community.

Federal voting intention

Feb 26, 2019

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward? If don’t know – Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Q       Total   2 Weeks ago 15/02/19   4 weeks ago   Election
01/02/19 02/07/16
Liberal 35% 31% 34%
National 3% 3% 4%
Total Liberal/National 38%   34% 38% 42.0%
Labor 37%   38% 36% 34.7%
Greens 9% 10% 10% 10.2%
Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 6% 7% 7%
Other/Independent 10% 11% 9% 13.1%
2 party preferred
Liberal/National 48%   45% 48% 50.4%
Labor 52%   55% 52% 49.6%
  1. Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results. The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2016 election.

Tax Policy

Feb 26, 2019

Q. From what you know, which of the following tax policies would you be more likely to support?

  Total Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Cut corporate tax and maintain tax concessions for investors and retirees 27% 32% 22% 20% 25% 35%
Close tax concession and loopholes and insert the money into schools, hospitals and other social programs 53% 51% 54% 57% 54% 48%
Unsure 20% 17% 24% 23% 21% 17%

Over half of respondents said they would be more likely to support the closing of tax concessions and loopholes, including a majority of males, females, and all age groups except for overs 55’s (though 48% of this age group supported still supported the measure, as opposed to the 35% who supported maintain tax concession for investors and retirees.

  Total Labor Liberal + National Greens NET: Other
Cut corporate tax and maintain tax concessions for investors and retirees 27% 15% 46% 17% 26%
Close tax concession and loopholes and insert the money into schools, hospitals and other social programs 53% 69% 35% 63% 54%
Unsure 20% 16% 19% 20% 20%

 The closing of tax concessions and loopholes was very strongly preferred by Labor voters (69% prefer) and Greens voters (63% prefer), though more Coalition voters supported the alternative measures of cutting corporate tax and maintaining tax concessions, with only 35% supporting closing concession and loopholes.

Better Party on Tax Policy

Feb 26, 2019

Q. Which party do you think would provide the better tax policies for each of the following groups if they were to win the next federal election in 2019?        

NET Labor Liberal/National Coalition Unsure
First-time home buyers +13 39% 26% 34%
Pensioners +12 41% 29% 30%
Workers earning up to $150,000 per year +11 40% 29% 31%
Workers earning more than $150,000 per year -11 34% 45% 21%
Self-funded retirees -21 23% 44% 33%
People who use family trusts -24 20% 44% 36%
Property investors -36 17% 53% 30%

The Labor party was seen as the best party for first home buyers (NET 13% more preferred), pensioners (12%), and workers earning up to $150k per year (11%). Conversely, the Coalition was seen as the best party for property investors (36% NET preferred), people who use family trusts (24%), self-funded retirees (21%), and workers earning more than $150k per year.

In all cases, between 21% and 36% said they were unsure who would be the best party, with uncertainty highest for who would be the best party for people who use family trusts (36% unsure) and first home buyers (34%).

Tax Policy Statements

Feb 26, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding tax policies?

  Strongly agree  + Somewhat agree Strongly disagree + Somewhat disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
The tax avoidance industry costs Australia $20B a year. Closing tax breaks and loopholes for corporations returns the money to the people through better funded public health and education and more infrastructure to cope with growth 59% 9% 30% 29% 18% 6% 3%
The Labor Party plans to close tax loopholes for the wealthy 53% 11% 23% 30% 18% 7% 4%
The Liberal Party’s tax policies favour wealthier Australians 51% 15% 30% 21% 19% 10% 5%
Labor’s policy is not to increase taxes but to stop tax concessions for the wealthy 46% 17% 21% 25% 18% 10% 7%
Taxes will always be higher under Labor 37% 23% 20% 17% 23% 14% 9%
The Labor Party plans to increase taxes 35% 22% 17% 18% 23% 14% 8%
I don’t really understand tax policy – I take my advice from my accountant 28% 33% 9% 19% 28% 19% 14%

The most widely agreed with statement addressed the tax avoidance industry and the benefits of curbing it (59% agree, while only 9% disagree). There was also majority support for the idea that the Labor Party plans to close tax loopholes for the wealthy (53% agree) and that the Liberal Party’s tax policies favour wealthier Australians (51% agree).

There is limited support for the idea that the Labor party is the higher taxing party  – 35% agree that the Labor party plans to increase taxes (while 22% disagree and 43% are either neutral or don’t know), while 37% agree that taxes will always be higher under Labor (while 23% disagree and 40% are either neutral or don’t know).

Just over a quarter of respondents believe that they don’t really understand tax policy (28% agree).

Tax Policy Comparison

Feb 26, 2019

Q. For each of the following pairs of tax policies, please select which one you would prefer was implemented by the Government?

Pair Total Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
1 Continue to allow property investors to claim negative gearing tax concessions 32% 33% 30% 24% 32% 38%
Invest in new social and community housing to ease rental costs 68% 67% 70% 76% 68% 62%
2 Continue to pay tax credits to people with shares who do not pay any income tax 39% 44% 35% 32% 40% 46%
Funding two days universal access to early learning for three and four year olds 61% 56% 65% 68% 60% 54%
3 Continue to allow people to split incomes through family trusts to minimise tax 35% 35% 37% 42% 35% 32%
Increase the Newstart allowance 65% 65% 63% 58% 65% 68%

Overall, there was a strong preference for investing in new social and community housing. (68% prefer) over continuing the practice of negative gearing (32% prefer), a strong preference for funding universal access to early learning for three and four year olds (61% prefer) over tax credits for those who do not pay income tax (39%), and a strong preference for increasing the Newstart allowance (65%) over allowing the use of family trusts to minimise tax (35%).

In each case, support for the former measure was highest amount Labor voters, Greens voters, and those aged 18-34, and the support for the latter measure was highest among Liberal/National voters.

Pair Total Labor Liberal + National Greens NET: Other
1 Continue to allow property investors to claim negative gearing tax concessions 32% 21% 47% 20% 31%
Invest in new social and community housing to ease rental costs 68% 79% 53% 80% 69%
2 Continue to pay tax credits to people with shares who do not pay any income tax 39% 29% 53% 26% 38%
Funding two days universal access to early learning for three and four year olds 61% 71% 47% 74% 62%
3 Continue to allow people to split incomes through family trusts to minimise tax 36% 23% 49% 26% 36%
Increase the Newstart allowance 64% 77% 51% 74% 64%

Most Important Issues

Feb 26, 2019

Q. Which of the following issues are the most important for the Federal Government to address over the next 12 months?

% Top
three
Improve the health system 31%
Reduce utility bills 31%
Create jobs and reduce unemployment 28%
Increase housing affordability 25%
Limit the amount of migration to Australia 24%
Crack down on tax avoidance by big companies 22%
Improve wages and working conditions 22%
Protection of the environment 16%
Promote renewable energy 15%
Provide more money for education 14%
Maintain strong border protection 14%
Provide tax cuts 12%
Reduce the budget deficit 12%
Ensure the security of energy supply 11%
Combat domestic crime 11%
Combat international crime and terrorism 6%
Improve conditions for refugees and asylum seekers 6%

The most important issues were improving the health system (31% placed it in their top three), reducing utility bills (31%) and creating jobs and reducing unemployment (28%).

There was comparatively little importance placed in improving conditions for refugees and asylum seekers (6% placed it in their top three), and combating international crime and terrorism (6%).

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