Awareness of dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau

Jul 9, 2019

Q. How closely have you been following the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau, following comments the player made on social media?

Q       Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
I have been following the dispute closely 22% 28% 16% 18% 20% 27%
I have read or seen some news about the dispute 46% 43% 49% 40% 45% 53%
I am aware of the dispute, but don’t know any details 17% 16% 18% 19% 17% 15%
I am not aware of the dispute 15% 13% 17% 24% 17% 5%
  •  28% of men stated that they have been following the dispute closely, compared to 16% of women.
  • 18% of 18 to 34 year olds stated that they have been the dispute closely, compared to 27% of over 55 year olds.
  • High-income earners were more likely than low- or mid-income earners to have been following the dispute closely (32% compared to 20% for both low- and mid-income earners).
  • University-educated respondents were also more likely to be following the dispute closely (28%) than those with a secondary school education (18%) or a professional qualification (20%).

General opinions on the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau

Jul 9, 2019

Q. Do you see the Israel Folau situation as being:

  Total Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Mainly about Folau’s freedom of speech and right to express his religious views 43% 35% 49% 28% 50%
Mainly about whether Rugby Australia should be able to dismiss an employee who is in breach of contract 49% 57% 45% 61% 41%
Don’t know 9% 6% 11% 9% 12%
  • Among those who have been following the dispute (either following it closely, or read or seen some news about it), the public is split, with similar proportions thinking the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau is mainly about Folau’s freedom of speech and right to express his religious views (43%) and those thinking it’s mainly about whether Rugby Australia should be able to dismiss an employee who is in breach of contract (49%).
  • Slightly more Australians stated that the Israel Folau dispute is mainly about a breach of his contract (49%) than freedom of speech (43%).
  • Coalition voters were more likely to select that the dispute is about Folau’s freedom of speech (49%) than Labor (35%) or Greens voters (28%).

Attitudes towards the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau

Jul 9, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding the ongoing dispute between Israel Folau and Rugby Australia?

NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media and should take responsibility for them 68% 7% 45% 23% 15% 4% 3% 10%
Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community 51% 20% 33% 18% 17% 10% 10% 13%
The actions of Israel Folau have caused damage to the Wallabies team and rugby in Australia 46% 21% 25% 20% 21% 11% 10% 12%
Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others 34% 36% 16% 18% 20% 15% 20% 10%
  • A majority of Australians agreed that ‘Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media and should take responsibility for them’ and that ‘Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community’.
Q       NET: Agree Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media and should take responsibility for them 68% 69% 67% 55% 66% 81%
Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community 51% 48% 54% 42% 49% 59%
The actions of Israel Folau have caused damage to the Wallabies team and rugby in Australia 46% 45% 47% 44% 45% 48%
Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others 34% 38% 30% 35% 33% 34%
  • 81% of over 55s agreed that ‘Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media, and should take responsibility for them’, compared to 66% of 35 to 54 year olds and 55% of 18 to 34 year olds. These groups were more likely to select ‘Don’t know’.
  • Similarly, 59% of over 55s agreed that ‘Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community’ compared to 42% of 18 to 34 year olds. Younger Australians were more likely to select ‘Don’t know (19% to 7% of over 55s).
  • 38% of men agreed that ‘Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others’, while only 30% of women agreed.
  • Coalition voters were more likely than Labor or Greens voters to agree that ‘Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others’. 41% of Coalition voters agreed, while 30% of Labor voters and 20% of Greens voters did so.

Greatest scientific achievement of 20th century

Jul 9, 2019

Q. Which of the following do you think was the greatest scientific achievement of the 20th century?

Q       Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Discovery of penicillin 40% 36% 43% 24% 36% 56%
Launch of the World Wide Web 18% 20% 17% 21% 20% 14%
First person to walk on the moon 10% 11% 8% 10% 10% 9%
First powered aircraft flight 8% 10% 7% 12% 8% 5%
Generation of electricity from nuclear power 6% 6% 7% 10% 5% 4%
Introduction of the contraceptive pill 6% 3% 8% 8% 5% 4%
Invention of the television 5% 6% 4% 4% 7% 3%
World’s first cloned animal 2% 3% 2% 4% 2% 1%
First person to reach the South Pole 2% 1% 2% 4% 1% 0%
Other scientific achievement 3% 4% 3% 2% 5% 3%
  • The discovery of penicillin was the most selected event, with 40% selecting it as the greatest scientific achievement of the 20th
  • As we approach the 50th anniversary of humans setting foot on the moon, 10% regard this as the greatest scientific achievement, behind the launch of the internet, selected by 18% of people.
  • Over 55s were more likely to select the discovery of penicillin (56%) than younger respondents (36% of 35 to 54 year olds and 24% of 18 to 34 year olds).
  • Those with a university education were more likely to select the launch of the World Wide Web (25%) than those with a secondary education (14%) or a professional qualification (16%).
  • Just 5% regarded the invention of the television as the greatest scientific achievement of the previous century.

Preferred Prime Minister

Jun 27, 2019

Q. Who do you think would make the better Prime Minister out of Scott Morrison and Anthony Albanese?

Q       Jun’19 May’19  Jul’16 Oct’13 Sep’10
Prime Minister 43%

(Morrison)

39%

(Morrison)

39%

(Turnbull)

41%

(Abbott)

47%

(Gillard)

Opposition 25%

(Albanese)

32%

(Shorten)

31%

(Shorten)

22%

(Shorten)

35%

(Abbott)

Don’t know 32% 28% 30% 37% 18%
  • Support for Scott Morrison as PM has risen since before the Federal Election, from 39% to 43% while Albanese has slightly lower support than Bill Shorten did before the Federal Election (25% to 32%).
  • However, it may be too soon to judge Albanese’s performance, as the number who replied ‘Don’t know’ has also crept up (from 28% to 32%).
  • Morrison received strong support (80%) from Coalition voters, while Labor voters were less sure of Albanese as PM (with 34% selecting ‘Don’t know’, double the number compared to Coalition voters – 17%). 40% of Other voters did not know who they would prefer.

Performance of Scott Morrison

Jun 27, 2019

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the job Scott Morrison is doing as Prime Minister?

Q       Total May’19  Jul’16

(Turnbull)

Sep’13

(Abbott)

Sep’10

(Abbott)

NET: Approve 48% 43% 37% 41% 43%
NET: Disapprove 36% 39% 48% 36% 37%
Don’t know 16% 18% 16% 23% 19%

 

Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Strongly approve 4% 31% 0% 9%
Approve 20% 54% 23% 33%
Disapprove 35% 5% 31% 27%
Strongly disapprove 29% 1% 29% 19%
Not sure 13% 8% 16% 14%
NET: Approve 24% 86% 23% 41%
NET: Disapprove 64% 6% 61% 45%
  • The proportion who strongly approve Scott Morrison’s performance has increased since before the election from 43% to 48%, while the proportion who disapprove has decreased from 39% to 36%.
  • Very few Greens voters and Labor voters strongly approve of his performance (0% and 4%). Overall approval for Morrison is over three times as strong among Coalition voters as it is for Greens or Labor voters (86% to 24% and 23% respectively).

Performance of Anthony Albanese

Jun 27, 2019

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the job Anthony Albanese is doing as Opposition Leader?

Q       Total May’19

(Shorten)

 Jul’16

(Shorten)

Nov’13

(Shorten)

Sep’10

(Gillard)

NET: Approve 35% 38% 39% 31% 45%
NET: Disapprove 25% 44% 41% 27% 37%
Don’t know 39% 18% 20% 43% 19%

 

Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Strongly approve 15% 4% 2% 3%
Approve 35% 27% 39% 17%
Disapprove 12% 22% 13% 23%
Strongly disapprove 3% 11% 2% 21%
Not sure 34% 36% 44% 36%
NET: Approve 50% 31% 41% 20%
NET: Disapprove 16% 33% 15% 44%
  • Albanese faces a similar approval rate (35% to 38%) but lower disapproval (25% to 44%) than Bill Shorten received in May 2019.
  • However, the difference has mostly gone towards an increase in those selecting ‘Don’t know’ (39% to 18%), suggesting he hasn’t been Opposition Leader long enough for voters to decide.
  • More than a third of Labor, Coalition and Other voters were not sure if they approved or disapproved of his performance (the number reached 44% for Greens voters).

Attitudes to Proposed Stage 3 Tax Cuts

Jun 27, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

NET: Strongly agree/somewhat agree NET: Strongly disagree/somewhat disagree Don’t know
Maintaining funding for education and health is more important than cutting taxes for people earning more than $200,000 78% 12% 10%
I think people earning over $150,000 should pay a higher rate of tax than those earning $40,000 74% 17% 8%
A $95 billion tax cut for high income earners will make it impossible for government to deliver essential services 57% 25% 18%
I support reducing taxes by $11,000 per year for people earning over $200,000 32% 55% 13%
  • Over three-quarters of voters favour funding for education and health over tax cuts for high earners.
  • Those most likely to say they supported reducing taxes for high income earners were also younger (40% of 18-34 year olds strongly agreeing) and wealthier (41% of high income earners strongly agreeing). Retirees were less likely to support the policy (66% net disagreeing).
NET: Strongly agree/somewhat agree Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Maintaining funding for education and health is more important than cutting taxes for people earning more than $200,000 78% 85% 74% 89% 76%
I think people earning over $150,000 should pay a higher rate of tax than those earning $40,000 74% 83% 68% 85% 74%
A $95 billion tax cut for high income earners will make it impossible for government to deliver essential services 57% 65% 52% 63% 60%
I support reducing taxes by $11,000 per year for people earning over $200,000 32% 27% 43% 23% 25%
  • Labor and Greens voters were more likely to agree with statement ‘Maintaining funding for education and health is more important than cutting taxes for those earning more than $200,000’.
  • They were also more likely to agree that ‘People earning over $150,000 should pay a higher rate of tax than those earning $40,000’, and that ‘A $05 billion tax cut for high income earners will make it impossible for government to deliver essential services’.
  • Coalition voters were more likely to agree with ‘I support reducing taxes by $11,000 per year for people earning over $200,000’, with 43% strongly agreeing compared to 27% of Labor voters, 23% of Greens voters and 25% of Other voters.
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