Most Important Issues

Oct 16, 2019

Q. Which of the following issues are the most important for the Federal Government to address over the next 12 months?

  Total Change (Feb’19) Feb’19
Create jobs and reduce unemployment 36% +8 28%
Improve the health system 32% +1 31%
Reduce utilities bills 27% -4 31%
Protection of the environment 27% +11 16%
Improve wages and working conditions 24% +2 22%
Increase housing affordability 19% -6 25%
Limit the amount of migration to Australia 19% -5 24%
Promote renewable energy 19% +4 15%
Crack-down on tax avoidance by big companies 16% -6 22%
Provide tax cuts 15% +3 12%
Ensure the security of energy supply 13% +2 11%
Maintain strong border protection 12% -2 14%
Provide more money for education 11% -3 14%
Combat domestic crime 10% -1 11%
Combat international crime and terrorism 8% +2 6%
Increase the budget surplus 6%
Improve conditions for refugees and asylum seekers 6% 6%
Base (n) 1,088 1,085
  • The most important issues for the Federal Government to address over the next 12 months are seen to be creating jobs and reducing unemployment (36%), improving the health system (32%), reducing utility bills and protecting the environment (both 27%).
  • Protecting the environment saw an 11pt increase as an important issue for the Federal Government to address from February 2019 (from 16% to 27%).

Syrian brides

Oct 16, 2019

Q. In Syria, 20 Australian women and 46 children are being held by the Syrian Democratic Forces alongside their husbands who were captured while fighting for the Islamic State. These women and children are not considered prisoners of war but are unable to leave the camp and return to Australia.

It’s a complex situation where national security issues, human rights violations and the law all intersect.

Broadly, to what extent do you support or oppose these women and children returning to Australia?

    Gender Age
  Total Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Strongly support 17% 15% 19% 29% 13% 10%
Somewhat support 22% 22% 22% 23% 26% 17%
Somewhat oppose 24% 30% 19% 10% 23% 37%
Strongly oppose 23% 21% 25% 23% 21% 26%
Don’t know 14% 12% 15% 15% 16% 10%
NET: Support 39% 37% 41% 52% 40% 27%
NET: Oppose 47% 51% 44% 34% 44% 62%
Base (n) 1,088 539 549 342 373 373

 

  Total Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Strongly support 17% 18% 15% 29% 10%
Somewhat support 22% 26% 19% 28% 19%
Somewhat oppose 24% 20% 31% 10% 41%
Strongly oppose 23% 23% 28% 17% 20%
Don’t know 14% 13% 8% 16% 10%
NET: Support 39% 45% 33% 57% 29%
NET: Oppose 47% 42% 59% 27% 61%
Base (n) 1,088 343 380 107 130
  • Almost half (47%) of participants are opposed to the Syrian brides and children being returned to Australia – this is driven by those over 55 (62% opposed), those with professional qualifications (53%), non-capital residents (53%), Liberal voters (59%) and independent/other voters (61%).
  • Greens voters (57%), 18-34 year olds (52%) and university educated participants (49%) are most supportive of the families returning home.

Types of family violence

Oct 9, 2019

Q. Which, if any of the following behaviours do you think would be considered as a type of family violence?

    Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Hitting, punching, etc. or restraining in any way 80% 78% 83% 68% 79% 92%
Displaying threatening behaviour 77% 72% 81% 63% 78% 87%
Harassing or threatening behaviour, calling insulting names 74% 68% 80% 65% 73% 83%
Non-consensual sexual activity 70% 63% 76% 58% 68% 81%
Limiting a person’s access to family and friends or lying to others about them 66% 58% 74% 54% 64% 79%
Controlling the money so a person is dependent on the other for finances 65% 57% 72% 54% 63% 76%
Making constant phone calls and sending text messages, or spying using electronic means 63% 57% 69% 50% 62% 76%
Withdrawal of support, control through anger or stonewalling 61% 55% 67% 53% 58% 72%
Not letting a person practise their own religion or forcing them to follow a religion they don’t want to 58% 50% 65% 47% 56% 69%
Controlling access to drugs or medication 56% 49% 62% 46% 57% 63%
None of these 3% 3% 4% 5% 4% 2%
Base 1,097 552 575 357 366 374

 

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens Independent / Other
Hitting, punching, etc. or restraining in any way 80% 81% 79% 81% 86%
Displaying threatening behaviour 77% 80% 74% 82% 77%
Harassing or threatening behaviour, calling insulting names 74% 78% 71% 76% 77%
Non-consensual sexual activity 70% 72% 67% 76% 74%
Limiting a person’s access to family and friends or lying to others about them 66% 67% 66% 72% 69%
Controlling the money so a person is dependent on the other for finances 65% 68% 60% 72% 66%
Making constant phone calls and sending text messages, or spying using electronic means 63% 68% 62% 67% 62%
Withdrawal of support, control through anger or stonewalling 61% 65% 58% 67% 65%
Not letting a person practise their own religion or forcing them to follow a religion they don’t want to 58% 60% 56% 59% 60%
Controlling access to drugs or medication 56% 60% 52% 64% 55%
None of these 3% 2% 2% 2% 2%
Base 1,097 346 346 115 154
  • The majority of participants (80%) considered physical abuse (hitting, punching, etc. or restraining in any way) as a form of family violence; however, this gradually decreased for less visible indicators of abuse such as spiritual and medical abuse (58% and 56%) respectively.
  • Broadly, men were less likely to identify forms of family violence outside of physical abuse than women – for example only 57% of men considered financial abuse as a form of family violence compared to 72% of women.
  • Younger participants were also less likely to consider any of the listed actions as family violence – with 68% of 18-34 year olds selecting physical abuse as a form of family violence compared to 92% of 55+ year olds.
  • Men aged between 18-34 years old were particularly less likely to identify forms of family violence with at most 63% indicating physical abuse and 39% spiritual abuse were forms of family violence.
  • Only two-fifths (42%) of men 18-34 years old believed harassing phone calls, or spying using electronic means was a form of family violence.

Enough being done to address family violence

Oct 9, 2019

Q. Do you think enough is being done to address each of the following aspects of family violence in Australia?

Not enough is being done Enough is being done Unsure
Arrest and prosecute perpetrators of family violence 67% 18% 15%
Behaviour change programs to help perpetrators change their violent behaviour 64% 17% 19%
Provide support and services for people who have already experienced family violence 61% 23% 16%
Education in schools to prevent attitudes that lead to family violence 59% 21% 20%
Raise awareness on the issue of family violence through advertising 52% 34% 15%

 Not enough is being done

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Arrest and prosecute perpetrators of family violence 67% 60% 73% 62% 62% 76%
Behaviour change programs to help perpetrators change their violent behaviour 64% 59% 69% 62% 64% 67%
Provide support and services for people who have already experienced family violence 61% 57% 65% 57% 60% 66%
Education in schools to prevent attitudes that lead to family violence 59% 55% 64% 58% 58% 62%
Raise awareness on the issue of family violence through advertising 52% 45% 58% 53% 52% 50%
Base 1,097 552 575 357 366 374
  • Women are more likely than men to say that not enough is being done to address any aspect of family violence in Australia – particularly arresting and prosecuting perpetrators (73% women, 60% men).
  • Liberal voters were less likely to say that not enough is being done to address family violence across the listed aspects.

Not enough is being done

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens Independent / Other
Arrest and prosecute perpetrators of family violence 67% 75% 61% 72% 73%
Behaviour change programs to help perpetrators change their violent behaviour 64% 71% 58% 77% 68%
Provide support and services for people who have already experienced family violence 61% 67% 54% 71% 66%
Education in schools to prevent attitudes that lead to family violence 59% 67% 55% 68% 59%
Raise awareness on the issue of family violence through advertising 52% 62% 43% 62% 52%
Base 1,097 346 374 115 154

 

PM Scott Morrison’s visit to the USA

Oct 2, 2019

Q. Last week, Scott Morrison made an official visit to the USA and held meetings with Donald Trump.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about this visit and relations with the USA?

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Unsure
It is important for the Prime Minister to have a good relationship with the US President, whoever they might be, for the good of the nation 77% 15% 32% 45% 10% 5% 9%
Scott Morrison should have attended the UN Climate Summit, alongside other world leaders, while in USA 70% 20% 39% 31% 13% 7% 10%
Scott Morrison has shown good diplomacy skills during his official visit to USA 57% 28% 20% 37% 16% 12% 16%
It reflects badly on Australia if Scott Morrison has a good relationship with Donald Trump 38% 48% 12% 26% 27% 21% 14%
The Trump Presidency has been good for Australia 32% 49% 11% 21% 26% 23% 19%
  • Men and Liberal voters tended to agree that Scott Morrison’s relationship with Donald Trump was beneficial to Australian, than Labor and Greens voters.
NET: Agree Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
It is important for the Prime Minister to have a good relationship with the US President, whoever they might be, for the good of the nation 77% 79% 74% 69% 75% 84%
Scott Morrison should have attended the UN Climate Summit, alongside other world leaders, while in USA 70% 68% 71% 68% 74% 67%
Scott Morrison has shown good diplomacy skills during his official visit to USA 57% 60% 54% 49% 54% 67%
It reflects badly on Australia if Scott Morrison has a good relationship with Donald Trump 38% 38% 39% 48% 41% 28%
The Trump Presidency has been good for Australia 32% 39% 25% 33% 32% 30%
Base 1,097 552 575 357 366 374

 

NET: Agree Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens Independent / Other
It is important for the Prime Minister to have a good relationship with the US President, whoever they might be, for the good of the nation 77% 74% 88% 72% 77%
Scott Morrison should have attended the UN Climate Summit, alongside other world leaders, while in USA 70% 78% 64% 77% 69%
Scott Morrison has shown good diplomacy skills during his official visit to USA 57% 43% 85% 36% 52%
It reflects badly on Australia if Scott Morrison has a good relationship with Donald Trump 38% 48% 27% 60% 31%
The Trump Presidency has been good for Australia 32% 22% 49% 22% 32%
Base 1,097 346 376 115 154

 

State of the economy

Oct 2, 2019

Q. Overall, how would you describe the current state of the Australian economy?

  Sep’19 May’18 Nov’17 May’17 Dec’16
Very good 5% 8% 3% 3% 2%
Quite good 27% 31% 30% 27% 21%
Neither good nor poor 32% 32% 38% 36% 37%
Quite poor 25% 18% 17% 23% 28%
Very poor 8% 6% 7% 6% 8%
Unsure 3% 5% 5% 5% 4%
NET: Good 32% 39% 33% 30% 23%
NET: Poor 33% 24% 24% 29% 36%
Base 1,097 1,033 1,021 1,007 1,001
  • Participants were quite mixed in their perceptions of the Australian economy, with an equal third believing the economy was in a good state (32%), poor state (33%) or neither good nor poor (32%).
  • Compared to May’18, more participants felt that the economy is in a poor state (up 9 percentage points, to 33%), closer to the Dec’16 high of 36%.
  • Liberal voters (45%) tended to be more positive in their evaluation of the economy than other voters (25%). 
  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Very good 5% 6% 5% 7% 4% 4%
Quite good 27% 28% 25% 28% 25% 26%
Neither good nor poor 32% 30% 34% 35% 31% 32%
Quite poor 25% 26% 25% 21% 28% 26%
Very poor 8% 8% 8% 5% 9% 9%
Unsure 3% 2% 4% 4% 3% 2%
NET: Good 32% 34% 30% 35% 30% 30%
NET: Poor 33% 33% 33% 26% 37% 35%
Base 1,097 552 575 357 366 374

 

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens Independent / Other
Very good 5% 4% 9% 3% 2%
Quite good 27% 24% 36% 20% 16%
Neither good nor poor 32% 29% 36% 36% 30%
Quite poor 25% 31% 17% 30% 33%
Very poor 8% 10% 1% 8% 17%
Unsure 3% 2% 1% 4% 1%
NET: Good 32% 28% 45% 23% 18%
NET: Poor 33% 41% 18% 37% 51%
Base 1,097 346 374 115 154

Indictors of whether the Australian economy is in a good or poor state

Oct 2, 2019

Q. Which of the following indicators do you think is the most important when thinking about whether the Australian economy is in a good or poor state?

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
The unemployment rate 25% 24% 25% 30% 26% 19%
The cost of household bills 22% 21% 24% 16% 23% 28%
The value of the Australian dollar to international currencies 13% 14% 12% 18% 12% 9%
The amount of homeless people on the streets 10% 9% 10% 14% 10% 7%
The interest rate set by Reserve Bank of Australia 9% 9% 8% 6% 8% 12%
The gross domestic product per person 8% 10% 6% 6% 8% 9%
The consumer price index 6% 5% 6% 6% 5% 6%
The size of the national surplus 6% 6% 7% 3% 6% 9%
The number of new shops, restaurants and cafes opening 2% 2% 2% 1% 2% 2%
Base 1,097 552 575 357 366 374

 

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens Independent / Other
The unemployment rate 25% 24% 24% 29% 22%
The cost of household bills 22% 23% 21% 13% 33%
The value of the Australian dollar to international currencies 13% 11% 14% 17% 9%
The amount of homeless people on the streets 10% 12% 6% 18% 9%
The interest rate set by Reserve Bank of Australia 9% 10% 9% 3% 8%
The gross domestic product per person 8% 9% 8% 6% 7%
The consumer price index 6% 5% 7% 7% 4%
The size of the national surplus 6% 4% 10% 6% 6%
The number of new shops, restaurants and cafes opening 2% 2% 2% 1% 3%
Base 1,097 346 374 115 154

Australian economy according to indicators

Oct 2, 2019

Q. Overall, how would you describe the current state of the Australian economy? and Which of the following indicators do you think is the most important when thinking about whether the Australian economy is in a good or poor state?

  NET: Good NET: Poor NET (+/-)
The size of the national surplus 51% 21% +30
The consumer price index 45% 24% +21
The gross domestic product per person 44% 31% +13
The value of the Australian dollar to international currencies 34% 27% +7
The unemployment rate 29% 29% 0
The interest rate set by Reserve Bank of Australia 32% 40% -8
The number of new shops, restaurants and cafes opening 41% 54% -13
The amount of homeless people on the streets 26% 41% -15
The cost of household bills 22% 39% -17
  • Half (51%) of those who think the national surplus is the best indicator for economic performance believe the economy is in a good place.
  • Those looking at household bills as an indicator for economic strength are the most pessimistic, with just 22% thinking the economy is in a good state, and 39% thinking it is in a poor state.
  • The amount of homeless people on the streets is a similarly negative economy indicator, with two-fifths of participants (41%) who consider this the most important indicator of the economy, believing the economy is in a poor state (compared to just 26% who think it’s in a good place).
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