Australia’s economy

Apr 6, 2010

Q. How important are each of the following for Australia to have a strong economy?

  Very important Somewhat important Not so important Don’t know
Low inflation 43% 42% 5% 10%
Low unemployment rate 57% 33% 3% 6%
Increased company profits 17% 46% 26% 11%
Low interest rates 38% 43% 10% 9%
A reduction in Government spending 35% 38% 19% 9%
Higher GDP 27% 41% 6% 26%
Increasing share prices 20% 40% 23% 16%
Increased wages for workers 30% 48% 15% 7%

Over half (57%) of those surveyed think that low unemployment rates is a very important for Australia to have a strong economy, 43% think low inflation is very important and 38% think low interest rates are very important. 

Labor voters were more likely to think that increased wages for workers are very important for Australia to have a strong economy (36%).  

Coalition voters were more likely to think that increased company profits (22%), a reduction in Government spending (48%) and an increasing in share prices (23%) are very important for Australia to have a strong economy. 

There were no substantial differences amongst the various demographic groups.  Comments »

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott

Apr 6, 2010

Q. Do you think the Opposition Leader Tony Abbott is spending too much time on activities not related to his job as Opposition Leader?

  %
Spend too much time 32%
Not spending too much time 45%
Don’t know 23%

Just under half (45%) of those surveyed think Tony Abbott is not spending too much time on activities not related to his job as Opposition Leader, 32% think he spends too much time on activities not related to his job and 23% don’t know.

Labor voters were more likely to think Tony Abbott is spending too much time on activities not related to his job (50%), while Coalition voters were more likely to think he is not spending too much time on activities not related to his job (76%). 

People aged 55 years and over were more likely to think Abbott is not spending too much time on activities not related to his job (53%), as were males (49%).  Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Mar 22, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1829 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 35%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 38% 44%
Labor 45% 56%
Greens 9%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 7%    

NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Firmness of voting intention

Mar 22, 2010

Q.  Would you describe your vote very firm, fairly firm but might consider another party as campaign develops or not at all firm and might very well consider another party as the campaign develops.

  Total % Federal Vote
Labor Coalition Greens
Very firm 44% 43% 58% 26%
Fairly firm 40% 47% 34% 50%
Not at all firm 14% 9% 7% 18%
Don’t know 2% 1% 1% 6%

Coalition voters were more likely than Labor voters to indicate their voting choice as very firm (58% v 43%).  47% of Labor voters and 50% of Greens voters indicated that their voting choice is fairly firm. 

People aged 65 years and over were more likely to indicate their voting choice as very firm (60%) while those aged 25 – 34 were more likely to indicate their voting choice as fairly firm (47%).  Comments »

Party best at looking after Australia’s interests

Mar 22, 2010

Q.  Which party – Labor or Liberal – would by best at the following –

  Labor Liberal No difference Don’t know
Being on the side of Australian working people when it comes to issues affecting them at the workplace 48% 18% 24% 10%
Handling the economy in a way that best protects ordinary working people in Australia 39% 30% 20% 11%
Creating jobs for Australian workers 36% 27% 26% 11%
Representing you and people like you 35% 30% 24% 11%
Handling the economy 30% 37% 23% 10%
Controlling inflation 24% 35% 31% 11%
Keeping interest rates low 23% 29% 35% 13%
Dealing with the budget and keeping government spending down in general 22% 42% 26% 10%

Just under half (48%) of those surveyed think that Labor is the best party at being on the side of Australian working people when it comes to issues affecting them at the workplace, 39% think Labor is best at handling the economy in a way that protects ordinary working people in Australia. 

The Liberal Party score highest in terms of dealing with the budget and keeping government spending down in general (42%) and handling the economy (37%). 

 In terms of being on the side of Australian working people when it comes to issues affecting them at the workplace, under half (46%) of Coalition voters surveyed think the Liberal Party is best at handling this, 33% of these voters think there is no difference and 16% of Coalition voters think Labor is best at being on the side of Australian working people when it comes to workplace issues.  Comments »

Better Prime Minister – Rudd or Abbott

Mar 22, 2010

Q.  Regardless of your likely party choice for the next election, which of the leaders – Kevin Rudd or Tony Abbott – do you think overall would be the best Prime Minister?

  21 Dec 09 22 March 10
Kevin Rudd 51% 50%
Tony Abbott 25% 30%
Don’t know 24% 19%

When it comes to a choice between Rudd and Abbott as the better Prime Minister, 50% selected Rudd and 30% selected Abbott.  The results for Rudd shifted slightly (-1%) since we last asked this question in December 2009. However, there has been a five percent increase in the number of people that prefer Abbott and a decrease in the number of people that don’t know (-5%). 

Results followed party lines – 92% of Labor voters chose Rudd and 74% of Coalition voters chose Abbott. 

 64% of Green voters selected Rudd and 11% of Green voters selected Abbott.

 People aged 65 years and over were more likely to think Abbott would make a better Prime Minister (42%), 18 – 24 year olds were more likely to indicate they don’t know who would make a better Prime Minister (28%).   Comments »

Better Prime Minister – Abbott or Gillard

Mar 22, 2010

Q. Who do you think would be the best Prime Minister out of Tony Abbott and Julia Gillard?

  %
Tony Abbott 37%
Julia Gillard 47%
Don’t know 17%

Just under half (47%) of those surveyed think that Gillard would make a better Prime Minister, 37% selected Abbott and 17% don’t know. 

 Results followed party lines – 78% of Labor voters selected Gillard and 79% of Coalition voters selected Abbott. 

61% of Green voters think that Gillard would make a better Prime Minister than Abbott.  

Males were more likely than females to select Abbott (40% v 34%).   46% of males and 47% of females chose Gillard.  

People aged 65 years and over were more likely to think Abbott would make a better Prime Minister (47%) and people aged 18 – 24 were more likely to indicate they don’t know (31%).  Comments »

Better Prime Minster – Rudd or Hockey

Mar 22, 2010

Q. And who do you think would be the best Prime Minister out of Kevin Rudd and Joe Hockey?

  %
Kevin Rudd 53%
Joe Hockey 27%
Don’t know 20%

In a choice between Rudd and Hockey as Prime Minister – over half (53%) think Rudd would make a better Prime Minister, 27% prefer Hockey and 20% don’t know. 

Results followed party lines – 88% of Labor voters prefer Rudd and 56% of Coalition voters prefer Hockey. 

Hockey performs better than Rudd amongst those that don’t know which party they will vote for in the next Federal election (50%). 

People aged 65 years and over were more likely to prefer Hockey (42%) and 18 – 24 year olds were more likely to indicate they don’t know (31%).  Comments »