Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 8, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1868 sample size Comments »

Liberal Party climate change policy

Feb 8, 2010

Q. Do you approve or disapprove the Liberal Party’s new policy on addressing climate change announced by Tony Abbott this week?

  %
Total approve 34%
Total disapprove 29%
Strongly approve 9%
Approve 25%
Disapprove 17%
Strongly disapprove 12%
Don’t know 37%

 34% of people approve of the Liberal Party’s new policy on addressing climate change, 29% disapprove and 37% don’t know.

 Coalition voters were more likely to approve the Liberal Party’s policy to address climate change (68%), while Labor and Green voters were more likely to disapprove (51% Labor, 47% Green).

 Males were more likely to approve of the Coalitions’ policy (44%), while females were more likely to indicate they don’t know (49%).  Comments »

Party with best climate change policy

Feb 8, 2010

Q. Which party do you think has the best policy for addressing climate change?

  %   7 December 2009* %
The Liberals 25%   Tony Abbott and the Coalition 27%
Labor 19%   Kevin Rudd and Labor 24%
The Greens 17%   Bob Brown and Greens 17%
Don’t know 39%   Don’t know 32%

 Most people (39%) don’t know which party has the best policy for addressing climate change.   One quarter (25%) think the Liberal Party has the best policy, 19% think Labor does and 17% think the Greens have the best policy for addressing climate change.

 Results followed party lines – Coalition voters were more likely to think the Liberal Party has the best policy (58%), Labor voters were more likely to think Labor (44%), and Green voters were more likely to think the Greens have the best policy for addressing climate change (78%).

 Males were more likely to think that the Liberal Party has the best policy (32%), while females were more likely to indicate that they don’t know which party has the best policy for addressing climate change (48%). 

 People aged 55 years and over were more likely to favour the Liberal Party’s policy when it comes to addressing climate change policy (37%), while people aged 25 – 34 were more likely to favour Labor (22%). 

 In December 2009, Essential Research put a similar question to the Australian public asking people to indicate whose position on the ETS and addressing climate change they most agree with.  The results obtained this week are reasonably similar to those obtained previously for both the Liberal Party and the Greens.  However the most notable difference is the result for Labor, with a 5% decrease since December.  Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 2, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1937 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 35%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 38% 44%
Labor 45% 56%
Greens 9%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 6%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Firmness of vote

Feb 2, 2010

Q. Would you say your choice is very firm, pretty firm but you might change your mind, or might you consider another party and leader as the campaign develops?

  Total Labor Coalition Green
Very firm 48% 54% 55% 31%
Pretty firm but I might change my mind 33% 33% 32% 43%
Might consider another party and leader closer to an election 17% 12% 12% 24%
Don’t know 2% 1% 1% 1%

 Just under half (48%) of those surveyed consider their voting choice as ‘very firm’, 33% consider their voting choice as ‘pretty firm but might change my mind’ and 17% ‘might consider another party and leader closer to an election’.

 Labor and Coalition voters were more likely to indicate their voting choice as ‘very firm’ (54% Labor, 55% Coalition), while Green voters were more likely to indicate their choice as ‘pretty firm, but I might change my mind’ (43%).

 People aged 55 years and over were more likely to consider their voting choice ‘very firm’ (60%), people aged 25 – 34 were more likely to indicate it as ‘pretty firm but I might change my mind’ (43%), while 18 – 24 year olds were more likely to indicate they ‘might consider another party and leader closer to an election’ (29%).   Comments »

Political campaigning in public spaces

Feb 2, 2010

Q. Politicians may be banned from campaigning in major shopping centres because the Shopping Centre Council claims that it causes too much disruption for shoppers. Do you agree or disagree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres?

  %
Total agree 57%
Total disagree 28%
Strong agree 26%
Agree 31%
Disagree 22%
Strongly disagree 6%
Don’t know 15%

 More than half (57%) of those surveyed agree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres, 28% disagree and 15% don’t know. 

 Coalition voters were more likely than Labor voters to agree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres (60% v 55%). 

 Results were reasonably consistent across age groups; however people in the 45 – 54 age group were slightly more likely to agree (60%). 

 People in South Australia were more likely than those living in other states to agree with banning politicians from campaigning in shopping centres (71%).  Comments »

Productivity in Australia

Feb 2, 2010

Q. The Prime Minister Kevin Rudd recently said that over the next decade Australia must build the best educated, best skilled and best trained workforce in the world to increase productivity and counter the effects of an ageing population. Do you agree or disagree?

  %
Total agree 82%
Total disagree 8%
Strong agree 34%
Agree 48%
Disagree 6%
Strongly disagree 2%
Don’t know 10%

 The majority of those surveyed agree with Kevin Rudd’s recent comments that over the next decade Australia must build the best educated, best skilled and best trained workforce in the world to increase productivity and counter the effects of an ageing population (82%), 8% disagree with the comments and 10% don’t know. 

 Results were consistent amongst most demographic groups.  However, Labor voters were more likely to strongly agree with Rudd’s statements (46%).  Comments »

Morality and politics

Feb 2, 2010

Q. The Opposition Leader Tony Abbott recently said that he believes women should try to remain virgins until they are married. Do you think Tony Abbott should or should not be giving advice on moral issues like sex and marriage?

  Total Firm Labor Soft Labor Firm Coalition Soft Coalition Firm Green Soft Green
Should be giving advice on moral issues 19% 11% 11% 39% 27% 10% 10%
Should not be giving advice on moral issues 70% 86% 83% 48% 67% 82% 87%
Don’t know 11% 3% 6% 13% 7% 8% 4%

 Most people (70%) think that Tony Abbott should not be giving advice on moral issues like sex and marriage, 19% think he should be giving advice on moral issues and 11% don’t know. 

 Males were more likely to think that Abbott should be giving advice on moral issues (23%), while females were more likely to think he should not (75%). 

 People aged 45 – 54  were more likely than those in other age groups to think Abbott should not be giving advice on moral issues (78%). 

Coalition voters were more likely to think Abbott should be giving advice on moral issues (34%), while Labor (84%) and Green (84%) voters were more likely to think he should not.  56% of Coalition voters and 67% of soft Coalition voters think Abbott should not be giving advice on moral issues. Comments »