Awareness of that Uluru will be closed for climbing

Jul 24, 2019

Q. Before today, were you aware that that from October, tourists will be prevented from climbing Uluru due the spiritual significance of the site to the Aboriginal traditional owners?

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Yes 69% 70% 68% 56% 67% 83%
No 31% 30% 32% 44% 33% 17%
Base (n) 1,091 538 553 348 358 385
  • Over two thirds (69%) of Australians are aware of the prevention of climbing Uluru from October.
  • Awareness of the ban is highest among those aged over 55 (83%).

Support for closing Uluru to climbing

Jul 24, 2019

Q. To what extent do you support or oppose the decision to close the Uluru climb to tourists?

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Strongly support 27% 25% 29% 27% 28% 26%
Somewhat support 17% 17% 16% 23% 15% 13%
Neither support, nor oppose 21% 20% 23% 19% 22% 22%
Somewhat oppose 14% 14% 14% 14% 12% 16%
Strongly oppose 16% 20% 13% 8% 17% 22%
Unsure 5% 4% 6% 9% 5% 1%
NET: Support 44% 43% 45% 50% 43% 39%
NET: Oppose 30% 34% 26% 22% 29% 38%
Base (n) 1,091 538 553 348 358 385
  • 27% strongly support the decision to prevent climbing Uluru, with a further 17% somewhat supporting the decision.
  • Support for the closure was highest among those aged 18-34 (50%) and Greens voters (56%).

Attitudes towards closing Uluru for climbers

Jul 24, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding the upcoming closure of Uluru in October?

  NET: Agree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree, nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Unsure
Tourists should respect the cultures and traditions of the Aboriginal traditional landowners when they visit Uluru 69% 46% 23% 16% 5% 5% 5%
The Aboriginal traditional landowners are the best people to manage Uluru according to their culture and traditions 52% 29% 23% 22% 10% 10% 6%
It is fine for tourists to climb Uluru while they can, despite the preference from Aboriginal traditional landowners that they do not 36% 17% 19% 21% 15% 21% 7%
I am less likely to visit Uluru now tourists are unable to climb up it 34% 19% 15% 25% 13% 23% 5%
  • 69% agree that tourists should respect the cultures and traditions of the Aboriginal traditional landowners when they visit Uluru and over half agree that the Aboriginal traditional landowners are the best people to manage Uluru according to their culture and traditions.
  • Around one in three agree that it is fine for tourists to climb Uluru while they can, despite the preference from Aboriginal traditional landowners that they do not (36%).
  • 34% agree that I am less likely to visit Uluru now tourists are unable to climb up it – slightly less than the 36% who disagree with the statement
NET: Agree Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Tourists should respect the cultures and traditions of the Aboriginal traditional landowners when they visit Uluru 69% 67% 72% 68% 66% 74%
The Aboriginal traditional landowners are the best people to manage Uluru according to their culture and traditions 52% 48% 56% 57% 52% 49%
It is fine for tourists to climb Uluru while they can, despite the preference from Aboriginal traditional landowners that they do not 36% 42% 31% 30% 37% 41%
I am less likely to visit Uluru now tourists are unable to climb up it 34% 39% 29% 33% 36% 32%
Base (n) 1,091 538 553 348 358 385

 

NET: Agree Total NET: Support climbing ban Neither support, nor oppose NET: Oppose climbing ban Unsure
Tourists should respect the cultures and traditions of the Aboriginal traditional landowners when they visit Uluru 69% 89% 61% 51% 38%
The Aboriginal traditional landowners are the best people to manage Uluru according to their culture and traditions 52% 78% 40% 28% 27%
It is fine for tourists to climb Uluru while they can, despite the preference from Aboriginal traditional landowners that they do not 36% 18% 29% 71% 9%
I am less likely to visit Uluru now tourists are unable to climb up it 34% 20% 23% 63% 20%
Base (n) 1,091 474 230 331 56

Despite opposing the upcoming Uluru climbing ban, over half (51%) of these people still agree that tourists should respect the cultures and traditions of the Aboriginal traditional landowners when they visit Uluru.

Direction and policies of the new Government

Jul 9, 2019

Q. Do you think the direction and policies of the new Government over the next three years will be good or bad for each of the following?

NET: Very good/Quite good NET: Very bad/Quite bad Very good Quite good Neither good nor bad Quite bad Very bad Don’t know
Large companies and corporations 54% 11% 18% 36% 27% 7% 4% 9%
Australia in general 36% 27% 7% 29% 30% 17% 10% 7%
The economy 33% 29% 7% 26% 31% 19% 10% 7%
Small business 33% 27% 6% 27% 31% 19% 8% 8%
Younger Australians 31% 32% 6% 25% 30% 20% 12% 7%
You and your family 28% 30% 6% 23% 35% 18% 12% 8%
Farmers and rural communities 27% 33% 6% 21% 31% 22% 11% 9%
The environment 26% 33% 6% 20% 33% 16% 16% 8%
Older Australians 26% 38% 5% 20% 28% 23% 15% 8%
  • Large companies were seen to be the main beneficiaries of Government direction and policies, with 54% predicting it would be Very, or Quite good for them
  • Less than a third (28%) thought the direction and policies would be good for them, and their families.
  • It is expected than older Australians (38%), the environment (33%) and farmers and rural communities (33%) will have a bad time over the next three years as a result of the Governments’ direction and policies.
NET: Very good/Quite good Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Large companies and corporations 54% 58% 57% 54% 55%
Australia in general 36% 20% 60% 17% 30%
The economy 33% 17% 57% 21% 26%
Small business 33% 24% 52% 17% 26%
Younger Australians 31% 19% 48% 23% 29%
You and your family 28% 18% 45% 18% 19%
Farmers and rural communities 27% 20% 39% 19% 22%
The environment 26% 18% 39% 14% 27%
Older Australians 26% 18% 37% 22% 18%
  • Coalition voters were more likely than Labor, Greens or Other voters to say the direction and policies of the new Government would be very good for all groups listed – except for large companies and corporations. 14% of Coalition voters said the direction and policies of the new Government would be very good for large companies and corporations, compared to 23% of Labor voters and 25% of Greens voters.
Q       NET: Very good/Quite good Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Large companies and corporations 54% 58% 50% 47% 52% 62%
Australia in general 36% 41% 32% 38% 32% 39%
The economy 33% 37% 30% 32% 30% 38%
Small business 33% 39% 28% 29% 33% 38%
Younger Australians 31% 34% 29% 31% 27% 35%
You and your family 28% 33% 24% 34% 27% 25%
Farmers and rural communities 27% 31% 22% 28% 26% 27%
The environment 26% 29% 23% 28% 24% 27%
Older Australians 26% 29% 22% 33% 26% 18%
  • Males were more likely than females to think that the direction and policies of the new Government would be very good or quite good for all the groups asked: you and your family (33% to 24%), small business (39% to 28%), large companies and corporations (58% to 50%), Australia in general (41% to 32%), the environment (29% to 23%), the economy (37% to 30%), older Australians (29% to 22%), younger Australians (34% to 29%), and farmers and rural communities (31% to 22%).
  • 50% of older Australians thought that the direction and policies of the new Government would be very bad or quite bad for older Australians, compared to 37% of 35 to 54 year olds and 25% of 18 to 34 year olds.

Freedom of speech

Jul 9, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding freedom of speech?

  NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
It is only right that people consider how what they say can affect others 69% 9% 32% 37% 22% 6% 3%
People should not be allowed to argue religious freedom to abuse others 64% 13% 36% 28% 23% 7% 6%
Nowadays, people are unlikely to say what they really think, as they are afraid of how others will react 64% 16% 28% 36% 20% 11% 5%
Employers should not have the right to dictate what their employees say outside work 58% 18% 29% 29% 24% 12% 6%
There should be stronger laws to protect people who express their religious views in public 38% 28% 16% 22% 34% 16% 12%
  • Over two thirds (69%) of Australians agreed that it is only right that people consider how what they say affects others. A large majority agreed that religious freedom should not be used to abuse others (64%).
  • There is some concern for freedom of speech, with 64% agreeing that people are unlikely to say what they really think, as they are afraid of how others will react and 58% agreeing that employers should not have the right to dictate what their employees say outside work.
  • Despite this, just 38% agree that stronger laws are needed to protect people to express their religious views.
NET: Very good/Quite good Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
It is only right that people consider how what they say can affect others 69% 76% 71% 73% 56%
People should not be allowed to argue religious freedom to abuse others 64% 68% 64% 75% 60%
Nowadays, people are unlikely to say what they really think, as they are afraid of how others will react 64% 61% 74% 47% 72%
Employers should not have the right to dictate what their employees say outside work 58% 59% 62% 55% 62%
There should be stronger laws to protect people who express their religious views in public 38% 38% 44% 29% 35%
  • Less than half (44%) of Coalition voters agree that there should be stronger laws to protect people who express their religious views in public.
  • 74% of Coalition voters agreed that ‘Nowadays, people are unlikely to say what they really think, as they are afraid of how others will react’, compared to 61% of Labor voters and 47% of Greens voters. Agreement with this statement was higher for those aged over 55 (75% agreement) than 35 to 54 year olds (62%) or 18 to 34 year olds (52%).
Q       NET: Agree Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
It is only right that people consider how what they say can affect others 69% 63% 74% 61% 67% 77%
People should not be allowed to argue religious freedom to abuse others 64% 60% 68% 56% 66% 69%
Nowadays, people are unlikely to say what they really think, as they are afraid of how others will react 64% 65% 63% 52% 62% 75%
Employers should not have the right to dictate what their employees say outside work 58% 60% 56% 48% 58% 67%
There should be stronger laws to protect people who express their religious views in public 38% 38% 38% 40% 37% 38%
  • 74% of women agreed that ‘It is only right that people consider how what they say can affect others’, compared to 63% of men. Older people were also more likely to agree with the statement, with 77% of over-55s agreeing compared to 61% of 18 to 34 year olds.
  • Agreement that ‘Employers should not have the right to dictate what their employees say outside work’ was higher for those over 55 (67%) than those than those between 35 and 54 (58%) or between 18 and 34 (48%).

Awareness of dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau

Jul 9, 2019

Q. How closely have you been following the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau, following comments the player made on social media?

Q       Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
I have been following the dispute closely 22% 28% 16% 18% 20% 27%
I have read or seen some news about the dispute 46% 43% 49% 40% 45% 53%
I am aware of the dispute, but don’t know any details 17% 16% 18% 19% 17% 15%
I am not aware of the dispute 15% 13% 17% 24% 17% 5%
  •  28% of men stated that they have been following the dispute closely, compared to 16% of women.
  • 18% of 18 to 34 year olds stated that they have been the dispute closely, compared to 27% of over 55 year olds.
  • High-income earners were more likely than low- or mid-income earners to have been following the dispute closely (32% compared to 20% for both low- and mid-income earners).
  • University-educated respondents were also more likely to be following the dispute closely (28%) than those with a secondary school education (18%) or a professional qualification (20%).

General opinions on the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau

Jul 9, 2019

Q. Do you see the Israel Folau situation as being:

  Total Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Mainly about Folau’s freedom of speech and right to express his religious views 43% 35% 49% 28% 50%
Mainly about whether Rugby Australia should be able to dismiss an employee who is in breach of contract 49% 57% 45% 61% 41%
Don’t know 9% 6% 11% 9% 12%
  • Among those who have been following the dispute (either following it closely, or read or seen some news about it), the public is split, with similar proportions thinking the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau is mainly about Folau’s freedom of speech and right to express his religious views (43%) and those thinking it’s mainly about whether Rugby Australia should be able to dismiss an employee who is in breach of contract (49%).
  • Slightly more Australians stated that the Israel Folau dispute is mainly about a breach of his contract (49%) than freedom of speech (43%).
  • Coalition voters were more likely to select that the dispute is about Folau’s freedom of speech (49%) than Labor (35%) or Greens voters (28%).

Attitudes towards the dispute between Rugby Australia and Israel Folau

Jul 9, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding the ongoing dispute between Israel Folau and Rugby Australia?

NET: Agree NET: Disagree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media and should take responsibility for them 68% 7% 45% 23% 15% 4% 3% 10%
Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community 51% 20% 33% 18% 17% 10% 10% 13%
The actions of Israel Folau have caused damage to the Wallabies team and rugby in Australia 46% 21% 25% 20% 21% 11% 10% 12%
Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others 34% 36% 16% 18% 20% 15% 20% 10%
  • A majority of Australians agreed that ‘Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media and should take responsibility for them’ and that ‘Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community’.
Q       NET: Agree Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media and should take responsibility for them 68% 69% 67% 55% 66% 81%
Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community 51% 48% 54% 42% 49% 59%
The actions of Israel Folau have caused damage to the Wallabies team and rugby in Australia 46% 45% 47% 44% 45% 48%
Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others 34% 38% 30% 35% 33% 34%
  • 81% of over 55s agreed that ‘Israel Folau chose to share his religious views on social media, and should take responsibility for them’, compared to 66% of 35 to 54 year olds and 55% of 18 to 34 year olds. These groups were more likely to select ‘Don’t know’.
  • Similarly, 59% of over 55s agreed that ‘Israel Folau has used his public profile to attack a minority group in the community’ compared to 42% of 18 to 34 year olds. Younger Australians were more likely to select ‘Don’t know (19% to 7% of over 55s).
  • 38% of men agreed that ‘Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others’, while only 30% of women agreed.
  • Coalition voters were more likely than Labor or Greens voters to agree that ‘Israel Folau has the right to voice his religious views, regardless of the hurt it could cause others’. 41% of Coalition voters agreed, while 30% of Labor voters and 20% of Greens voters did so.
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