Influence of China

Aug 19, 2019

Q. Thinking about Australia’s relationship with China, how do you rate the influence of China on each of the following aspects?

  Very positive Somewhat positive Somewhat negative Very negative Unsure
Australia’s defence, military, and national security 10% 23% 27% 17% 22%
Australia’s international trade 19% 40% 18% 9% 15%
Australia’s culture 11% 32% 27% 12% 18%
Australia’s politics 8% 22% 32% 16% 21%
Chinese corporations and businesses operating in Australia 10% 31% 25% 19% 16%
  • Almost one fifth of participants (19%) believe that China has a very positive influence on Australia’s defence, military and national security, with another 23% providing a somewhat positive rating.
  • Nearly one in five participants thought that China’s influence on Chinese corporations and businesses operating in Australia was very negative (19%).
  • Another one-fifth were unsure about China’s influence on Australian politics (21%).
  • Broadly, those aged 18-34 years old, on high household incomes, in paid employment or with university education were more positive about China’s influence on Australia.

Australia’s defence, military, and national security

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Very positive 10% 11% 8% 18% 8% 5%
Somewhat positive 23% 25% 22% 32% 24% 15%
Somewhat negative 27% 30% 25% 22% 26% 32%
Very negative 17% 19% 15% 7% 15% 28%
Unsure 22% 15% 30% 22% 26% 20%
Base (n) 1,096 536 560 347 364 385
  • Those aged between 18-34 years old (18%) or in paid employment (14%) were more likely to believe that China had a very positive impact on Australia’s defence, military, and national security than those over 35 years old (7%) or in other employment groups (6%).
  • Participants without dependent children were more likely to think that believe that China had a very negative impact on Australia’s defence, military, and national security (20%) than those with dependent children (12%).

Australia’s international trade

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Very positive 19% 23% 15% 26% 17% 14%
Somewhat positive 40% 44% 36% 40% 38% 42%
Somewhat negative 18% 17% 19% 15% 18% 21%
Very negative 9% 7% 10% 6% 9% 10%
Unsure 15% 8% 21% 14% 18% 12%
Base (n) 1,096 536 560 347 364 385
  • Male participants were more likely to say that China had a very positive impact on Australia’s international trade (23%) than females (15%).
  • Participants aged between 18-34 years old were more likely to think that China had a very positive impact on Australia’s international trade (26%) than those over 35 (15%).
  • Similarly, those in paid employment or a high household income (23% and 25% respectively) more likely to think that China had a very positive impact on Australia’s international trade than those in other employment states (14%) or with lower or mid-household incomes (17%).
  • Participants with university education were also more likely to say that China had a very positive impact on Australia’s international trade (24%) than those with only a secondary school education (11%).

Australia’s culture

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Very positive 11% 13% 9% 19% 10% 6%
Somewhat positive 32% 32% 32% 38% 30% 29%
Somewhat negative 27% 29% 24% 22% 26% 32%
Very negative 12% 14% 10% 4% 12% 20%
Unsure 18% 11% 24% 17% 23% 13%
Base (n) 1,096 536 560 347 364 385
  • Younger participants (aged 18-34 years old, 19%) were more likely to say China had a very positive influence on Australia’s culture than those over 35 (8%).
  • Those in paid employment (15%) or university education (16%) were more likely to say China had a very positive influence on Australia’s culture than those in other employment groups (7%) or with less education (9%).

Australia’s politics

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Very positive 8% 11% 6% 15% 8% 3%
Somewhat positive 22% 22% 22% 28% 25% 14%
Somewhat negative 32% 36% 29% 28% 29% 38%
Very negative 16% 19% 14% 9% 16% 23%
Unsure 21% 13% 29% 20% 22% 21%
Base (n) 1,096 536 560 347 364 385
  • Younger participants (aged 18-34 years old, 15%) were more likely to say China had a very positive influence on Australia’s politics than those over 35 (6%).
  • Similarly, those in paid employment (12%) were more likely to say China had a very positive influence on Australia’s politics than those in other employment groups (4%).

Chinese corporations and businesses operating in Australia

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Very positive 10% 11% 8% 17% 9% 4%
Somewhat positive 31% 33% 29% 33% 33% 26%
Somewhat negative 25% 25% 24% 22% 22% 30%
Very negative 19% 20% 17% 13% 16% 26%
Unsure 16% 10% 22% 15% 20% 14%
Base (n) 1,096 536 560 347 364 385
  • Participants aged 18-34 were more likely to say that China had a very positive influence over Chinese corporations and businesses operating in Australia (17%) than those over 35 years old (7%).
  • Those in paid employment were also more likely to say China had a very positive influence over Chinese corporations and businesses operating in Australia (13%) than those in other employment groups (7%).

Most beneficial country to strengthen our relationship with

Aug 19, 2019

Q. Given the choice between the United States of America and China, which country do you think it would be most beneficial for Australia strengthen our relationship with?

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
United States of America 38% 44% 33% 41% 31% 43%
China 28% 31% 25% 31% 30% 24%
Neither 18% 15% 21% 13% 24% 18%
Unsure 15% 10% 21% 16% 15% 15%
Base (n) 1,096 536 560 347 364 385
  • Male participants tended to favour the United States of America (44%) more than females (33%).
  • Liberal/National voters (50%) tended to favour the United States of America more than Labour (34%) and Greens (24%) voters – Labour voters were more likely than any other voters to say they were unsure (17%) which country would be most beneficial for Australia (compared to all other voters 10%).
  • Participants aged 35-54 years old were least likely to Australian would benefit more from strengthening their relationship with the United States of America (31%), compared to 42% of those between 18-34 or over 55 years old.
  • A third of those with university educations (34%) suggested that Australian would benefit more from strengthening their relationship with China, more so than those in other education bands (26%).

Support proposed changes to remove abortion from NSW Criminal Code (NSW only)

Aug 19, 2019

Q. To what extent do you support or oppose the proposed changes to the law to remove abortion from the Criminal Code and re-define it as a medical procedure?

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Strongly support 44% 37% 51% 44% 42% 47%
Somewhat support 27% 31% 24% 28% 31% 23%
Somewhat oppose 8% 12% 5% 8% 7% 9%
Strongly oppose 9% 10% 8% 9% 6% 12%
Unsure 12% 10% 13% 11% 14% 9%
NET: Support 71% 68% 75% 72% 71% 73%
NET: Oppose 17% 22% 13% 17% 17% 13%
Base (n) 351 170 181 110 123 118
  • 44% of New South Welshmen strongly support the proposed changes to the Criminal Code and another 27% somewhat support this measure.

Awareness of Newstart payment amount

Aug 6, 2019

Q. As far as you know, how much is the weekly Newstart payment for a single person with no children (this is the benefit paid to people who are out of work)?

  Total Gender Age   June

2018

Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+  
Less than $250 per week 24% 23% 25% 25% 23% 25%   23%
Between $250 and $300 per week 40% 40% 40% 33% 40% 46%   27%
Between $300 and $400 per week 10% 10% 9% 11% 11% 8%   10%
More than $400 per week 5% 6% 4% 8% 5% 2%   4%
Don’t know 21% 21% 22% 23% 22% 19%   36%
Base (n) 1,102 543 559 348 374 380   1,091
  • Two-fifths (40%) of participants correctly selected ‘Between $250 and $300 per week’ as the Newstart payment.
  • Younger participants (18-34 year olds) were less likely than other age groups to correctly select the Newstart payment (33%), while 55+ year olds (46%) were more likely than others.
  • In June 2018 only a quarter (27%) of participants selected the correct weekly amount for Newstart, which is significantly lower than in 2019, and more than a third (36%) didn’t know.
  Total Income
NET: Lower Income NET: Mid-Income NET: High Income
Less than $250 per week 24% 24% 28% 23%
Between $250 and $300 per week 40% 46% 38% 37%
Between $300 and $400 per week 10% 9% 13% 9%
More than $400 per week 5% 4% 4% 8%
Don’t know 21% 17% 17% 23%
Base (n) 1,102 399 301 275
  • Almost one-in-ten (8%) high income participants thought that the weekly Newstart amount was more than $400, twice as many as those on lower or mid-incomes (both 4%).
  • Forty-six percent of lower income participants correctly selected $250-$300 per week as the Newstart payment.

Appropriateness of Newstart benefit amount

Aug 6, 2019

Q. The Newstart benefit for a single person with no children is about $280 per week.

Do you think it is too high, too low or about right?

  Total Gender Age c June

2018

Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+  
Too high 5% 7% 3% 6% 7% 2%   9%
About right 30% 31% 30% 42% 24% 27%   26%
Too low 58% 57% 59% 46% 60% 66%   50%
Don’t know 7% 5% 8% 6% 9% 5%   15%
Base (n) 1,102 543 559 348 374 380   1,091
  • Almost three-fifths (58%) of participants thought that the Newstart benefit of $280 per week was too low for a single person with no children.
  • Two-thirds (66%) of participants over 55 years old thought that the Newstart benefit was too low, compared to 46% of those 18-34 years old.
  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Too high 5% 3% 7% 2% 9%
About right 30% 25% 40% 25% 25%
Too low 58% 66% 48% 69% 59%
Don’t know 7% 6% 6% 3% 7%
Base (n) 1,102 320 387 107 159
  • Two-thirds (66%) of Labor voters thought that the Newstart benefit was too low, compared to 48% of Coalition voters. Coalition voters were more likely than Labor voters to believe that the benefit was about right (40% Coalition, 25% Labor).

Attitudes towards Newstart

Aug 6, 2019

Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about job searching and Newstart?

  NET: Agree Strongly agree Somewhat agree Neither agree, nor disagree Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree
In Australia, no-one should have to go without essentials like food, healthcare and power 84% 61% 23% 10% 3% 3%
Politicians are out of touch with what it’s like for people having to live off Newstart payments 73% 49% 23% 16% 7% 4%
Increasing the Newstart payment could help people find jobs, by providing funds for transport, internet access and training 66% 33% 33% 16% 12% 6%
The money it would cost to increase the Newstart payments would be better spent on other services 30% 12% 18% 30% 20% 20%
  • A large majority of participants agreed that no-one should have to go without essentials like food, healthcare and power (84%) with three-fifths (61%) strongly agreeing with this statement.
  • Three-quarters (73%) also agreed that politicians are out of touch with what it’s like for people having to live off Newstart payments with almost half (49%) strongly agreeing with this statement.
  • Two-thirds (66%) of participants agreed that increasing the Newstart payment could help people find jobs, by providing funds for transport, internet access and training.
  • Only 30% agreed that the money it would cost to increase the Newstart payments would be better spent on other services.
NET: Agree Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
In Australia, no-one should have to go without essentials like food, healthcare and power 84% 81% 88% 75% 86% 91%
Politicians are out of touch with what it’s like for people having to live off Newstart payments 73% 71% 75% 65% 74% 78%
Increasing the Newstart payment could help people find jobs, by providing funds for transport, internet access and training 66% 64% 68% 61% 67% 69%
The money it would cost to increase the Newstart payments would be better spent on other services 30% 32% 27% 36% 30% 24%
Base (n) 1,102 543 559 348 374 380
  • Participants over 55 years old were more likely than younger participants to agree that no-one should have to go without essentials like food, healthcare and power (91% compared to 81%); and that politicians are out of touch with what it’s like for people having to live off Newstart payments (78% compared to 70%).
NET: Agree Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
In Australia, no-one should have to go without essentials like food, healthcare and power 84% 89% 82% 85% 86%
Politicians are out of touch with what it’s like for people having to live off Newstart payments 73% 79% 64% 84% 82%
Increasing the Newstart payment could help people find jobs, by providing funds for transport, internet access and training 66% 72% 61% 78% 68%
The money it would cost to increase the Newstart payments would be better spent on other services 30% 25% 38% 22% 30%
Base (n) 1,102 320 387 107 159
  • Labor voters were more likely than Liberal voters to agree that no-one should have to go without essentials like food, healthcare and power (79% compared to 64%).
  • Coalition voters were more likely to agree than all other voters, that the money it would cost to increase the Newstart payments would be better spent on other services (38% versus 26% all other voters).
  • Coalition voters were also less likely than all other voters to agree that increasing the Newstart payment could help people find jobs, by providing funds for transport, internet access and training (61% versus 72% all other voters).
NET: Agree Total Income
NET: Lower Income NET: Mid-Income NET: High Income
In Australia, no-one should have to go without essentials like food, healthcare and power 84% 89% 86% 76%
Politicians are out of touch with what it’s like for people having to live off Newstart payments 73% 79% 72% 66%
Increasing the Newstart payment could help people find jobs, by providing funds for transport, internet access and training 66% 74% 66% 57%
The money it would cost to increase the Newstart payments would be better spent on other services 30% 26% 32% 34%
Base (n) 1,102 399 301 275
  • Lower income participants were more likely to agree with most of the statements than high income participants.

Preference for spending priorities

Aug 6, 2019

Q. Recent Government commitments to provide a tax break for Australia’s top income earners will cost the country approximately $12B per year, whereas increasing the Newstart payment would cost an estimated $4B per year.

Given the above information, which of the following options would you prefer the Government prioritise its spending?

  Total Gender Age
Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+
Spend $12B a year to provide a tax cut for Australia’s top income earners 12% 16% 9% 15% 14% 8%
Spend $4B a year to increase the Newstart payment for those looking for a job 70% 68% 71% 64% 66% 77%
Unsure 18% 15% 20% 20% 20% 14%
Base (n) 1,102 543 559 348 374 380
  • 70% of the population would prefer spending on increasing Newstart be made a priority, compared to 12% who think the Stage 3 tax cuts should be a priority.
  • Participants aged over 55 were more likely to prefer the Government prioritise an increase to Newstart (77%) than 18-54 year olds (65%).
  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Spend $12B a year to provide a tax cut for Australia’s top income earners 12% 6% 19% 9% 14%
Spend $4B a year to increase the Newstart payment for those looking for a job 70% 82% 61% 81% 68%
Unsure 18% 11% 20% 10% 18%
Base (n) 1,102 320 387 107 159
  • Labor voters were more likely than Coalition voters (82% versus 61%) to prefer the Government prioritise increasing Newstart over a tax cut for top income earners.
  Total Income
NET: Lower Income NET: Mid-Income NET: High Income
Spend $12B a year to provide a tax cut for Australia’s top income earners 12% 7% 15% 19%
Spend $4B a year to increase the Newstart payment for those looking for a job 70% 78% 71% 60%
Unsure 18% 15% 15% 20%
Base (n) 1,102 399 301 275
  • Lower income earners were more likely to prioritise increasing Newstart (78%) than high income earners (60%) – high income earners were over twice as likely to prioritise a tax cut for top income earners (19%) than lower income earners (7%).

Support or oppose increase to Newstart

Aug 6, 2019

Q. To what extent would you support or oppose an increase to the weekly rate of Newstart from $280 per week to $355 per week?

  Total Federal Voting Intention
Labor Coalition Greens NET: Other
Strongly support 44% 55% 29% 63% 52%
Somewhat support 31% 29% 39% 20% 19%
Somewhat oppose 11% 6% 14% 10% 15%
Strongly oppose 7% 5% 11% 2% 7%
Unsure 7% 4% 6% 6% 6%
Base (n) 1,102 320 387 107 159

Greens and Labor voters were more likely to strongly support an increase to Newstart (63% and 55%) than Coalition voters (29%); while Coalition voters were twice as likely to strongly oppose this measure (11% compared to 5% all other voters).

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