Federal politics – voting intention

Oct 9, 2013

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,865 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

7 Sep 13

(current  figures)

 

4 weeks ago

9/9/13

2 weeks ago

23/9/13

Last week

1/10/13

This week

8/10/13

Liberal

 

45%

41%

40%

40%

National

2%

3%

3%

Total Lib/Nat

45.5%

45%

43%

43%

43%

Labor

33.4%

35%

37%

36%

35%

Greens

8.7%

8%

9%

9%

9%

Other/Independent

12.4%

12%

11%

12%

12%

 

2 Party Preferred

Election

7 Sep 13

 

4 weeks ago

2/9/13

2 weeks ago

16/9/13

Last week

1/10/13

This week

8/10/13

Liberal National

53.4%

52%

52%

Labor

46.6%

48%

48%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election.

International Relations (importance of relationships)

Oct 9, 2013

Q. How important is it for Australia to have a close relationship with the following nations?

 

Very important

Quite important

Not very important

Don’t know

Very Import
ant

(28 Mar 11)

Very Import
ant

(14 Nov 11)

Very Import
ant

(29 Oct 12)

Change – Oct 12 to Oct 13

United States

51%

38%

6%

4%

60%

55%

55%

-4%

New Zealand

56%

32%

8%

4%

69%

61%

54%

2%

United Kingdom

42%

43%

11%

4%

56%

47%

47%

-5%

China

46%

42%

8%

5%

48%

48%

45%

1%

Indonesia

35%

41%

18%

6%

31%

27%

33%

2%

Japan

27%

52%

15%

6%

39%

32%

31%

-4%

India

19%

41%

32%

8%

26%

23%

26%

-7%

Germany

17%

38%

35%

9%

23%

18%

20%

-3%

South Africa

12%

32%

45%

12%

16%

12%

14%

-2%

More than half the respondents think it is very important to have close relationships with the New Zealand (56%) and the United States (51%) and just under half think it is very important to have a close relationship with  China (46%) and the United Kingdom (42%).

A close relationship with the United States is considered very important by 62% of Liberal/National voters, 47% of Labor voters and 41% of Greens voters.

Since this question was asked last October, there have been decreases in the rating of the importance of relations with India (-7%) and the United Kingdom (-5%). There have been only very slight increases in the importance of the relationship with Indonesia (+2%) and New Zealand (+2%).

International Relations (preference for close relationships)

Oct 9, 2013

Q. Would you like to see Australia’s relationship with these countries get closer, stay the same or become less close?

 

Get closer

Stay the same

Become less close

Don’t know

 

Get closer

(28 Mar 11)

Get closer

(14 Nov 11)

Get closer

(29 Oct 11)

Change – Oct 12 to Oct 13

China

33%

49%

10%

9%

32%

35%

29%

4%

New Zealand

34%

55%

3%

8%

37%

33%

26%

8%

Indonesia

29%

45%

15%

10%

21%

23%

25%

4%

India

21%

52%

16%

12%

19%

23%

24%

-3%

Japan

24%

57%

9%

10%

26%

24%

22%

2%

United Kingdom

22%

60%

9%

8%

25%

19%

21%

1%

United States

20%

59%

13%

8%

24%

18%

21%

-1%

Germany

18%

60%

10%

13%

18%

20%

18%

South Africa

12%

59%

14%

15%

13%

14%

12%

33% favour closer relations with China, 34% with New Zealand, 29% with Indonesia and 24% with Japan.

Liberal/National voters were more likely to favour closer relationships with the United States (24%). Greens voters are more likely to favour closer relationships with Indonesia (38%).

Labor voters were more likely to favour closer relationships with New Zealand (40%) and Japan (28%)

Those aged 18-25 were more likely to favour closer relationships with Japan (45%), New Zealand (48%), China (51%) and Germany (28%).

Since this question was asked last year, the percentages wanting a closer relationship with the New Zealand (+8%) has increased.

Trust in the Government’s handling of international relations

Oct 9, 2013

Q. How much trust do you have in Tony Abbott and the Liberal Government to handle Australia’s international relations?

 

 

A lot of trust

18%

Some trust

23%

A little trust

16%

No trust

37%

Don’t know

7%

Just 18% of people have ‘a lot of trust’ in Tony Abbott and the Liberal Government to handle Australia’s international relations.

37% have no trust.

Females (41%) were more likely than males (32%) to have no trust.

Labor (67%) and Green (63%) voters were far more likely to have ‘no trust’. Liberal/National voters were far less likely (2%) to have no trust.

Approval of information collection

Oct 9, 2013

Q. It has recently been revealed that US agencies have been secretly monitoring most of the world’s phone and internet traffic. This information is shared with friendly governments such as Australia’s.

Do you support or oppose the US government’s secret collecting of this information?

 

 

Support

24%

Oppose

45%

Strongly support

6%

Support

18%

Neither support nor oppose

26%

Oppose

20%

Strongly oppose

25%

Don’t know

6%

Just 24% of people support the US government’s secret collecting of the world’s phone and internet traffic. 45% oppose it.

Liberal/National voters (34%) were more likely to support the US collecting this information.

Labor (58%) and Green (62%) voters were more likely to oppose it.

Justification for information collection

Oct 9, 2013

Q. The US government says the collection of phone and internet records is necessary in order to protect national security and fight terrorism.

Do you agree or disagree that governments are justified in collecting information on all people regardless of whether there is any suspicion of wrongdoing?

 

 

Agree

42%

Disagree

45%

Strongly agree

10%

Agree

32%

Disagree

23%

Strongly disagree

22%

Don’t know

13%

42% of people agree that governments are justified in collecting information on all people regardless of whether these is any suspicion of wrongdoing. 45% disagree.

Liberal/National voters (57%) were more likely to agree. Labor (56%) and Green (58%) voters were more likely to disagree.

Trust in groups to protect privacy

Oct 9, 2013

Q. How much trust do you have in the following groups to protect your privacy?

 

 A lot of trust

Some trust

A little trust

No trust

Don’t know

Your internet service provider

13%

37%

29%

18%

3%

Google

7%

27%

31%

32%

4%

Facebook

4%

11%

23%

57%

5%

Twitter

3%

9%

18%

55%

15%

The Australian government

9%

32%

33%

22%

4%

The US government

4%

19%

28%

43%

7%

Over half of people have no trust in Facebook (57%) or Twitter (55%) to protect their privacy. Just under half have no trust in the US government to protect their privacy (43%).

Very few people (13% or less) have a ‘lot of trust’ in the organisations listed to protect their privacy.

Just 41% of people have a lot/some trust in the Australian government to protect their privacy.

Those aged 18-24 (42%) and 25-34 (44%) were less likely to have no trust in Facebook. While those aged 35-44 (60%), 45-54 (66%), 55-64 (62%) and 65+ (63%) were more likely to have ‘no trust’.

The same theme was repeated for Twitter, with those aged 18-24 (31%) and 25-34 (45%) being less likely than those aged 35-44 (58%), 45-54 (63%), 55-64 (64%) and 65+ (63%) to have ‘no trust’.

Liberal/National voters were more likely to have a lot/some trust in the Australian government to protect their privacy (54%). Labor (33%) voters were less likely to have a lot/some trust in the Australian Government to protect their privacy.

 

Australian companies, information and foreign companies

Oct 9, 2013

Q. Do you agree or disagree that companies providing services to Australians should reveal what information they give to foreign governments?

 

 

Agree

73%

Disagree

16%

Strongly agree

39%

Agree

34%

Disagree

9%

Strongly disagree

7%

Don’t know

12%

73% agree that companies providing services to Australia should reveal what information they give to foreign governments. Just 16% disagree.

Those aged 45-54 (46%) and 55064 (53%) were more likely to strongly agree.

Labor voters (49%) were also more likely to strongly agree.

Pages:12»