Federal politics – voting intention

Jul 30, 2012

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,837 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

2/7/12

2 weeks ago

16/7/12

Last week

23/7/12

This week

30/7/12

Liberal

45%

46%

45%

45%

National

3%

3%

4%

3%

Total Lib/Nat

43.6%

49%

49%

49%

49%

Labor

38.0%

32%

31%

33%

33%

Greens

11.8%

10%

10%

10%

10%

Other/Independent

6.6%

9%

9%

9%

8%

 

2PP

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

2 weeks ago

Last week

This week

Total Lib/Nat

49.9%

56%

57%

56%

55%

Labor

50.1%

44%

43%

44%

45%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election. These estimates have a confidence interval of approx. + or – 2%.

Important election issues

Jul 30, 2012

Q.  Which are the three most important issues in deciding how you would vote at a Federal election?

 

First

Second

Third

Total

30 Jul 12

5 Dec 11

6 June 11

25 Jan 10

Management of the economy

38%

16%

10%

64%

62%

61%

63%

Ensuring a quality education for all children

5%

10%

11%

26%

22%

26%

23%

Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system

10%

19%

18%

47%

47%

49%

48%

Protecting the environment

3%

4%

4%

11%

13%

15%

16%

A fair industrial relations system

4%

3%

5%

12%

11%

8%

*

Political leadership

11%

7%

7%

25%

18%

17%

23%

Addressing climate change

3%

3%

3%

9%

10%

15%

16%

Controlling interest rates

2%

2%

5%

9%

11%

13%

15%

Australian jobs and protection of local industries

13%

15%

13%

41%

36%

32%

33%

Ensuring a quality water supply

*

1%

2%

3%

4%

5%

12%

Housing affordability

3%

5%

5%

13%

13%

16%

14%

Ensuring a fair taxation system

4%

7%

7%

18%

16%

17%

14%

Security and the war on terrorism

1%

1%

3%

5%

4%

8%

9%

Treatment of asylum seekers

3%

4%

3%

10%

8%

5%

*

Managing population growth

2%

3%

3%

8%

8%

12%

*

*Not asked

64% of people surveyed rated management of the economy as one of their three most important issues, followed by 47% ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system and 41% Australian jobs and protection of local industries.

Since December, there has been an increase in the importance of political leadership (+7%), Australian jobs and protection of local industries (+5%) and ensuring a quality education for all children (+4%).

Workers’ Productivity

Jul 30, 2012

Q. And overall, in your experience, how productive are most Australian workers?

 

6 Feb 12

Total

30 Jul 12

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Full time workers

Part time workers

Very productive

15%

14%

19%

12%

12%

14%

12%

Quite productive

59%

59%

61%

61%

62%

61%

63%

Not so productive

19%

19%

13%

21%

15%

19%

17%

Not at all productive

2%

3%

2%

2%

6%

3%

2%

Don’t know

5%

5%

5%

4%

5%

3%

6%

73% think that overall, most Australian workers are very or quite productive. These responses are almost identical to those when this question was asked in February.

Labor voters (80%) are more likely than Liberal/National voters (73%) to think workers are productive. There were no significant differences across income or age groups.

Increasing Productivity

Jul 30, 2012

Q. Which of the following would be the most effective way to increase productivity in Australian workplaces?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Full time workers

Part time workers

More flexibility for businesses in how they employ and manage workers

21%

18%

28%

12%

23%

12%

More input from workers into how businesses are managed

17%

19%

13%

25%

15%

29%

Invest more in skills and education

35%

40%

29%

42%

35%

30%

Invest more in technology and innovation

8%

11%

8%

9%

8%

7%

Stop Government assistance to industries so that they are forced to be productive or close

10%

5%

15%

8%

11%

12%

Don’t know

9%

7%

7%

4%

8%

10%

35% think investing more in skills and education is the most effective way to increase productivity, 21% favour more flexibility for businesses in how they employ and manage workers and 17% nominated more input from workers into how businesses are managed.

40% of Labor voters and 42% of Greens voters favour investing in skills and education while 28% of Liberal/National voters favour more flexibility for businesses in how they employ and manage workers.

25% of Greens voters and 29% of part-time workers favoured more input from workers into how businesses are managed.

Industrial Relations Laws

Jul 30, 2012

Q. Business groups have said that Australia’s industrial relations laws favour workers and unions and should be changed so that businesses can increase productivity and have more flexibility with their workforce. Do you think Australia’s industrial relations laws favour employers or workers or do they balance the interests of workers and employers?

 

6 Feb 12

Total

30 Jul 12

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Full time workers

Part time workers

Favour employers

25%

20%

25%

16%

33%

22%

16%

Favour workers

24%

26%

12%

43%

14%

29%

24%

Balance the interests of employers and workers

34%

34%

49%

26%

26%

33%

37%

Don’t know

17%

20%

13%

15%

26%

17%

23%

Respondents were divided over whether Australia’s industrial relations laws favour employers or workers – 20% think they favour employers, 26% favour workers and 34% think they balance the interests of both.

Labor voters are more likely to think they balance workers and employers interests (49%) while Liberal/National voters are more likely to think they favour workers (43%). Only 12% of Labor voters and 14% of Greens voters think the laws favour workers.

Opinion of Gonski Report Recommendations

Jul 30, 2012

Q. The Gonski report on funding education has recommended a new model for school funding that would mean all students are entitled to a set level of funding regardless of where they go to school, disadvantaged schools receive more funding and taxpayer funding for private schools is adjusted down based on parents’ capacity to pay.

Do you support or oppose these recommendations?

 

Total

27 Feb 12

Total

30 Jul 12

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total support

68%

65%

71%

59%

83%

Total oppose

13%

14%

14%

20%

2%

Strongly support

25%

25%

34%

16%

47%

Support

43%

40%

37%

43%

36%

Oppose

9%

10%

10%

14%

2%

Strongly oppose

4%

4%

4%

6%

Don’t know

19%

20%

14%

21%

15%

65% say they support the recommendations of the Gonski report on funding education and 14% were opposed. Support has weakened very slightly (-3%) since this question was asked in February after the release of the Gonski Report.

Strongest support was shown by Labor voters (71%), Greens voters (83%) and people aged 55+ (70%).

Funding Schools

Jul 30, 2012

Q. Do you think all schools should get a similar increase in funding, public schools should receive a larger increase or private schools should receive a larger increase?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

All schools should receive a similar increase in funding

28%

23%

39%

7%

Public schools should receive a larger increase

63%

74%

51%

79%

Private schools should receive a larger increase

2%

1%

3%

Don’t know

7%

2%

6%

13%

63% think that public schools should receive a larger increase in funding, 2% think private schools should receive a larger increase and 28% think all schools should receive a similar increase.

Labor voters (74%) and Greens voters (79%) showed strongest support for increased funding for public schools – although a majority (51%) of Liberal/National voters also supported it.

Workplace Bullying

Jul 30, 2012

Q. Over the last 2 or 3 years, have you been subjected to bullying at work or witnessed bullying of any of your work colleagues?

 

Total

Men

Women

Aged

18-34

Aged

35-54

Aged 55+

Full time workers

Part time workers

I have been bullied at work

13%

10%

15%

14%

16%

7%

14%

14%

I have witnessed bullying at work

19%

19%

19%

23%

21%

12%

25%

20%

Total bullied/witnessed bullying

26%

25%

27%

30%

30%

15%

34%

25%

No, I haven’t been bullied or witnessed bullying

55%

56%

55%

56%

58%

49%

62%

64%

I don’t work

15%

14%

16%

5%

10%

35%

Don’t know

4%

5%

2%

9%

2%

1%

4%

11%

26% of respondents said they had been bullied or witnessed bullying in the workplace over the last 2-3 years. 15% of women and 16% of people aged 35-54 said they had personally been bullied.

34% of full-time workers and 25% of part-time workers said they had been bullied or witnessed bullying. Levels of bullying were similar across income groups.

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