Australia’s assistance in fighting Ebola

Oct 21, 2014

Q. The Australian Government has committed $18 million to efforts to fight Ebola in West Africa, but has said the risks are too high to send medical or other personnel at this time. Do you think Australia is doing enough or not doing enough to assist the international efforts to fight Ebola?

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Doing enough

58%

54%

74%

36%

56%

Not doing enough

21%

32%

10%

42%

17%

Don’t know

21%

14%

17%

22%

26%

58% of respondents think Australia is doing enough to assist the international efforts to fight Ebola and 21% think we are not doing enough.

74% of Liberal/National voters and 54% of Labor voters think we are doing enough but 42% of Greens voters think we are not doing enough.

62% of women think we are doing enough compared to 54% of men.

Support for aid to fight Ebola

Oct 21, 2014

Q. Would you support or oppose Australia providing the following types of aid to fight Ebola in West Africa?

 

Total support

Total oppose

 

Strongly support

Support

Oppose

Strongly oppose

Don’t know

Increased funding

53%

31%

12%

41%

20%

11%

16%

Sending workers to build hospitals

48%

37%

9%

39%

23%

14%

15%

Sending medical personnel

44%

41%

 

10%

34%

25%

16%

15%

Sending troops for security and logistics

36%

48%

7%

29%

28%

20%

16%

A majority (53%) would support Australia increasing funding to aid the fight against Ebola in West Africa.

However less than 50% support sending medical personnel (44%), troops (36%) or other workers (48%).

Those most likely to support sending medical personnel were Greens voters (62%) and those with university education (52%).

Why should Australia increase foreign aid?

May 8, 2012


With Treasurer Wayne Swan reaching deep to produce his promised Budget surplus, foreign aid has become one of the victims.

The Government’s long standing promise to increase aid will happen but it will be delayed for another year. Currently Australia allocates just 0.35 per cent of National Gross Income — or 35c for every $100. The change means that by 2015-16, it will increase to 50c in every dollar. It’s still a long way from the top global donor, Norway, which gives $1.10 out of every $100 of its national income to the world’s poor.

Tim O’Connor from UNICEF tells 3Q Australia rates poorly compared with the rest of the world, ranking 13th out of 23 OECD nations. The delay in increasing funding has been criticised by aid groups and according to UNICEF it will cost lives.

Australian Spend on Aid

Apr 30, 2012

Q.  In 2000 John Howard signed the Millennium Declaration committing Australia to spend 0.7% of Gross National Income on aid (the equivalent of 70 cents in every $100 earned in the economy). How much do you think Australia spent on aid in 2011?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

0.35

13%

15%

12%

16%

0.5

12%

10%

16%

14%

0.7

7%

10%

7%

8%

More than 0.7

24%

28%

25%

20%

Don’t know

44%

37%

40%

42%

When asked home much of Australia’s Gross National Income is spent on aid, the largest proportion of respondents stated ‘don’t know’ (44%).

The next largest proportion (24%) said that it was more than the 0.7 committed in the Millennium Declaration.

13% said that Australia spent 0.35 on aid, and 12% said 0.5. Just 7% said 0.7.

There was little difference across voting intention.

Females (48%) were more likely than males (39%) to select ‘don’t know’.

Comments »

Australian Commitment to Aid

Apr 30, 2012

Q. The bipartisan commitment on aid says Australia will allocate 0.5% of Gross National Income (50 cents of every $100 earned in Australia) by 2015. Considering Australia gave 0.35% in 2011, do you think Australia should meet this commitment?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Should commit 0.5%

37%

46%

29%

62%

Should not commit 0.5%

35%

25%

46%

15%

Don’t know

29%

28%

25%

23%

The respondents were quite evenly split in their response to this question – 37% think Australia should commit 0.5% by 2015, 35% think that Australia should not commit to 0.5% by 2015 and 29% don’t know.

Lib/Nat voters were more likely to state that Australia should not commit to 0.5% (46%). Green voters were more likely to state that Australia should commit to 0.5% (62%).

Males (40%) were more likely than females (29%) to think that Australia should not commit to 0.5%. Females (33%) were more likely than males (24%) to select ‘don’t know’.

Those aged 18-24 were more likely to think that Australia should commit to 0.5% (48%).

Those in QLD were more likely to think Australia should not commit to 0.5% (43%).

Comments »