Taking Sick Days

Mar 26, 2012

Q. Which of the following apply to you over the last 12 months?

 

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

I have taken a sickie (that is, a day off work when you weren’t really sick)

23%

23%

22%

30%

21%

8%

 I have taken a day off sick without a doctor’s certificate

51%

49%

52%

55%

53%

34%

I have taken a day off sick with a doctor’s certificate

47%

49%

44%

49%

49%

33%

I have gone to work when I was sick

81%

83%

78%

83%

82%

70%

* based of those who worked in paid employment over the last 12 months

More than three times as many respondents said that, over the last 12 months, they had worked when they were sick than had taken a “sickie”. 81% said they had gone to work when they were sick and 23% said they had taken a day off work when they weren’t really sick.

Men (83%) were a little more likely than women (78%) to go to work when they were sick.

Those aged under 35 were a little more likely to take a “sickie” (30%) but were also more likely to go to work when they were sick (83%).

Older respondents seem to be less likely to get sick at all – 70% said they had worked when sick – and only 34% had taken a day off with a doctor’s certificate and 33% without a doctor’s certificate.

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Workplace Issues

Nov 21, 2011

Q. How much say should employees have in the following issues in their workplace?

Total a lot/

some say

A lot of say Some say A little say No say at all Don’t know
Health and safety 90% 63% 27% 7% 2% 1%
Working conditions 88% 55% 33% 8% 2% 1%
When they can take annual leave 86% 42% 44% 11% 2% 2%
Hours of work and rostering 77% 26% 51% 19% 3% 2%
Wages 76% 24% 52% 18% 4% 2%
Offshoring jobs (i.e. transferring jobs to another country) 66% 37% 29% 18% 12% 4%
Redundancies 65% 24% 41% 21% 11% 3%
CEO salary and bonuses 59% 29% 30% 18% 20% 3%
Board decisions 44% 16% 28% 29% 22% 4%

A majority of respondents think employees should have a lot or some say in all workplace issues listed except for board decisions.

63% think employees should have a lot of say in health and safety, 55% in working conditions, 42% in annual leave and 37% in offshoring jobs.

Those on lower incomes (under $1,000pw) were more likely to think employees should have a lot of say in off-shoring jobs (45%) and CEO salary and bonuses (35%).

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Annual Leave Entitlements in Australia

Oct 12, 2009

Q. Most employees in Australia are entitled to take four weeks paid annual leave after each 12 months of work. Do you think this is a sufficient or do you think Australian workers should get more?

More than half (59%) of those surveyed think that four weeks paid annual leave after 12 months of work is sufficient, while 35% think that Australian workers should get more.

Labor and Coalition voters were more likely to think that four weeks paid annual leave is sufficient (59% Labor, 71% Coalition), while Green voters were more likely to think Australian workers should get more (45%).

People aged 55 years and over were more likely to think that four weeks paid annual leave is sufficient (84%), while people aged 35 years or less were more likely to think Australian workers should get more annual leave (61%).

Full-time workers were more likely than part-time workers to think Australian workers should get more annual leave (44% v 37%).

People earning $1000 – $1600 per week were more likely than those in other income groups to think Australian workers should get more annual leave (42%).

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Australian Workers and Length of Annual Leave

Oct 12, 2009

Q. Thinking about your job, how much annual leave do you get from your employer?

19% of people surveyed get less than four weeks annual leave from their employer, 63% get four weeks and 18% get five weeks or more annual leave from their employer.

People on lower incomes were more likely to get less than four weeks annual leave from their employer (49% earning $600 per week or less, 38% earning $600 – $1000 per week).  People on higher incomes were more likely to get four weeks annual leave ($1600 + per week 69%).  23% of people earning $1600 per week or more receive five weeks or more annual leave from their employer.

Full-time workers were more likely than part-time workers to get four weeks annual leave from their employer (72% v 45%).

64% of non union members and 58% of union members get four weeks annual leave from their employer.   Union members were more likely than non union members to get five weeks or more annual leave from their employer (32% v 14%).

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Australian Workers and Annual Leave

Oct 12, 2009

Q. Do you agree or disagree that you feel pressured by your employer, or because of your workload, to NOT take your annual leave?

27% of people surveyed agree that they feel pressured by their employer or because of workload to not take their annual leave, 50% of people disagree that they feel pressured by their employer or because of workload to not take annual leave and 23% don’t know.

People aged 25 -34 were more likely than those in other age groups to agree that they feel pressured by their employer or because of workload to not take annual leave (42%).

Full-time workers were slightly more likely than part-time workers to agree that they feel pressured to not take annual leave (29% v 23%).

People earning $1000 – $1600 per year were more likely to agree that they feel pressured by their employer or because of workload to not take their annual leave (34%), while 55% of people earning $1600 per week disagree that they feel pressured not to take their annual leave.

Union members were more likely than non union members to disagree that they feel pressured by their employer or because of their workload to not take annual leave (60% v 47%).

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