Carbon emission target

Aug 25, 2015

Q. The Federal Government has proposed a target of 26-28% reduction in carbon emissions by 2030. The Climate Change Authority has recommended a 40-60% reduction by 2030. Which proposal do you favour most?

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

Liberal Government’s 26-28% reduction

23%

12%

43%

5%

17%

Climate Change Authority’s 40-60% reduction

50%

65%

27%

89%

57%

Don’t need to reduce carbon emissions

10%

6%

17%

2%

13%

Don’t know

17%

16%

13%

4%

14%

50% favour the Climate Change Authority’s recommendation of a 40-60% reduction in carbon emissions by 2030 and 23% favour the Liberal Government’s 26-28% reduction target.

The Climate Change Authority’s recommendation has highest support from Greens voters (89%), Labor voters (65%), aged 18-24 (68%) and university educated (58%).

Carbon emissions

Jul 14, 2015

Q. Australia’s current target to reduce its carbon emissions is a 5% reduction on our 2000 level of emissions by 2020. The Climate Change Authority recently recommended that, because of commitments by other countries, Australia’s target should be 30% below our 2000 level of emissions by 2025. Should Australia:

  Total   Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Vote other
Retain its current target of 5% 18% 10% 34% 3% 16%
Move to a higher target, such as 10% 25% 24% 28% 18% 30%
Move to the recommended target of 30% 34% 43% 17% 72% 30%
Not have any target 7% 6% 10% 2% 9%
Don’t know 16% 17% 11% 4% 15%

Only 18% think that Australia should retain its current target of 5% reduction in carbon emissions by 2020. 34% think that Australia should move to the recommended target of 30% and 25% think we should move to a higher target such as 10%.

43% of Labor voters and 72% of Greens voters think Australia should move to the 30% target. 34% of Liberal/National voters think Australia should keep the current 5% target while 45% think it should be higher.

Carbon Tax

Nov 21, 2011

Q. Do you support or oppose the Government’s carbon pricing scheme which, from July 2012, will require industries to pay a tax based on the amount of carbon pollution they emit?

7 March 18 April 23 May 14 June 18 July 1 Aug 19 Sep 17 Oct Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total support 35% 39% 41% 38% 39% 39% 37% 39% 38% 66% 13% 86%
Total oppose 48% 49% 44% 49% 49% 51% 52% 53% 53% 26% 80% 11%
Strongly support 9% 13% 14% 13% 15% 15% 14% 14% 14% 28% 1% 48%
Support 26% 26% 27% 25% 24% 24% 23% 25% 24% 38% 12% 38%
Oppose 19% 15% 15% 19% 16% 19% 17% 17% 17% 11% 22% 5%
Strongly oppose 29% 34% 29% 30% 33% 32% 35% 36% 36% 15% 58% 6%
Don’t know 18% 12% 15% 13% 12% 10% 12% 9% 10% 9% 7% 2%

Views on the carbon pricing scheme have changed very little since June and there has been no significant change since the legislation was passed. 38% support the scheme (down 1% since October) and 53% oppose (no change).

The only demographic group to support the scheme were aged under 35’s – 45% support/40% oppose. Among those aged 55+, 37% support and 59% oppose.

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The Carbon Tax

Mar 21, 2011

Q. Thinking about the proposed carbon tax, do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

Total agree Total disagree Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
A carbon tax will substantially increase the cost of electricity 79% 8% 47% 32% 6% 2% 13%
The cost of electricity will increase substantially even without a carbon tax 78% 11% 26% 52% 10% 1% 11%
A carbon tax is an effective way to force large polluting companies to reduce their carbon pollution 42% 43% 13% 29% 21% 22% 14%
A carbon tax will increase investment in renewable energy 41% 38% 14% 27% 20% 18% 22%

79% agree that a carbon tax will substantially increase the cost of electricity but 78% agree that the cost of electricity will increase substantially even without a carbon tax.

Respondents were evenly divided over whether a carbon tax is an effective way to force large polluting companies to reduce their carbon pollution (42% agreer/43% disagree) and whether a carbon tax will increase investment in renewable energy (41% agree/38% disagree).

Males (84%) were more likely than females (74%) to agree or strongly agree that ‘a carbon tax will substantially increase the costs of electricity.’

Females (53%) were more likely than males (41%) to agree or strongly agree that ‘a carbon tax is an effective way to force large polluting companies to reduce their carbon pollution.’

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Delay Carbon Tax

Mar 7, 2011

Q. Do you think Australia should delay imposing a carbon pollution tax until the US has established an equal or stronger carbon pricing system? (Question commissioned by Network Ten)

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Men Women Aged

18-34

Aged

35-54

Aged 55+
Yes 45% 33% 62% 13% 51% 40% 34% 47% 56%
No 33% 47% 21% 71% 34% 33% 40% 31% 29%
Don’t know 21% 20% 17% 16% 15% 27% 25% 22% 15%

45% of respondents think Australia should delay imposing a carbon pollution tax until the US has established an equal or stronger carbon pricing system and 33% think we should not delay.

Those most likely to think Australia should delay imposing a carbon pollution tax were Coalition voters (62%), men (51%) and aged 55+ (56%).

Those most likely to disagree were Greens voters (71%), Labor voters (47%) and aged 18-34 (40%).

Download the Network Ten: Essential Question of the Week (1.1 MB pdf)

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