Government Actions on Economy

Aug 29, 2011

Q. If the Australian economy weakens and unemployment goes up would you approve or disapprove of the Government taking the following actions?

Total approve Total disapprove Strongly approve Approve Disapprove Strongly disapprove Don’t know
Reduce interest rates 79% 11% 32% 47% 8% 3% 11%$
Cut taxes for both individuals and businesses 61% 25% 16% 45% 21% 4% 14%
Cut taxes on low and middle income earners to help with cost of living while offsetting the revenue loss with a carbon tax on the 500 big polluters 61% 27% 26% 35% 15% 12% 12%
Introduce a mining tax on the big miners and use the money for govt. investment in infrastructure and social spending to stimulate the economy 58% 26% 24% 34% 16% 10% 16%
Cut taxes on lower and middle income earners to help with cost of living with no offsetting carbon tax on the 500 big polluters 51% 33% 15% 36% 24% 9% 16%
Cut taxes and cut Government investment in infrastructure and social spending 39% 43% 12% 27% 30% 13% 18%

Actions most approved were reduce interest rates (79% approve), cut taxes for both individuals and businesses (61%) and cut taxes on low and middle income earners to help with cost of living while offsetting the revenue loss with a carbon tax on the 500 big polluters (61%).

Cutting taxes while offsetting the revenue loss with a carbon tax was more popular than not offsetting the tax cuts with a carbon tax (61% to 51%).

The only action not approved by a majority was cutting taxes and investment in infrastructure and social spending (39% approve/43% disapprove). This was approved by 48% of Liberal/National voters but only 33% of Labor voters and 27% of Greens voters.

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Support for Carbon Tax if Compensated

Mar 29, 2011

Q. If the Government compensated households by cutting income tax and increasing welfare payments, would you be more likely or less likely to support the proposed carbon tax?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Men Women Age

18-34

Aged

35-54

Aged 55+
Total more likely 38% 58% 26% 49% 37% 40% 43% 38% 34%
Total less likely 16% 10% 23% 14% 20% 12% 16% 16% 15%
Much more likely 14% 26% 7% 20% 15% 14% 16% 15% 12%
Somewhat more likely 24% 32% 19% 29% 22% 25% 27% 23% 22%
Somewhat less likely 5% 6% 6% 4% 7% 3% 6% 6% 4%
Much less likely 11% 4% 17% 10% 13% 8% 10% 10% 11%
Makes no difference 35% 24% 46% 26% 35% 35% 26% 36% 46%
Don’t know 11% 8% 5% 11% 8% 13% 15% 10% 6%

38% of respondents agreed they would be more likely to support the proposed carbon tax if the Government compensated households by cutting income tax and increasing welfare payments, 16% said they would be less likely to support it and 35% said it would make no difference.

Those most likely to support the tax were Labor voters (58%), Greens voters (49%) and younger respondents (43% of people aged 18-34). 46% of Coalition voters and 46% of those aged 55+ said it would make no difference to their view.

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Compensation for Carbon Tax

Mar 7, 2011

Q. It is expected that a tax on carbon pollution will increase the cost of electricity. Which of the following do you think should receive compensation for this increased cost?

Should receive compensation Should not receive compensation Don’t know
Low income households 84% 8% 8%
Farmers 74% 13% 13%
Small business owners 70% 14% 15%
All households 70% 16% 14%
Trade exposed industries 28% 44% 29%
Manufacturing industries 26% 51% 23%
The aluminium industry 18% 56% 26%
Power companies 15% 68% 17%

There was strong majority support for compensating households (especially low income households), farmers and small businesses.

Support for compensating companies and industries was relatively low. A little over one quarter think trade exposed and manufacturing industries should be compensated and only 15% think power companies should be compensated.

Although all voter groups showed similar support for compensating low income families, Coalition voters showed stronger support for compensation for all other groups – for example, 78% of Coalition voters thought all households should be compensated compared to 65% of Labor voters and 51% of Greens voters.

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