Party Attributes Comparison – Labor vs Liberal

Apr 27, 2011

Labor Liberal

% difference
Divided 66% 49% +17%
Will promise to do anything to win votes 72% 65% +7%
Out of touch with ordinary people 61% 54% +7%
Extreme 38% 36% +2%
Looks after the interests of working people 39% 38% +1%
Moderate 51% 55% -4%
Have a vision for the future 43% 48% -5%
Has a good team of leaders 34% 40% -6%
Understands the problems facing Australia 40% 51% -11%
Keeps its promises 20% 33% -13%
Too close to the big corporate and financial interests 46% 60% -14%
Clear about what they stand for 28% 44% -16%

When these questions were last asked in March 2010, the Labor Party had significant leads over the Liberal Party on all positive attributes.

For this survey, the only attribute on which there is any significant advantage for the Labor Party is  “too close to the big corporate and financial interests” (Labor 46%/Liberals 60%).

The Liberal Party is seen more favourably in terms of being divided, clear about what they stand for, keeps it promises and understands the problems facing Australia.

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Careers

Apr 27, 2011

Q. Which of the following occupations do you think provide good careers for young people?

Yes No Don’t know
Trades 88% 6% 6%
Computing and information technology 86% 6% 7%
Nursing 78% 15% 7%
Teaching 75% 17% 8%
Tourism and hospitality 72% 19% 9%
Police 71% 20% 9%
Defence forces 71% 20% 9%
Banking and finance 70% 19% 10%
Retail 54% 36% 10%

The most favoured occupations for providing good careers were thought to be trades (88%), computing and IT (86%) and nursing (78%).

All occupations tested scored at least 70% except for retail at 54%.

Younger respondents (aged 18-35) tended to have a similar order of preference to the general population – their most favoured occupations were trades (78%), computing and IT (76%), teaching (68%) and nursing (67%).

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Regulation of Gambling

Apr 27, 2011

Q. For each of the following forms of gambling, which do you think need more or less regulation?

Needs more regulation Needs less regulation Current regulation is about right Don’t know
Online gambling in general 68% 4% 16% 12%
Poker machines 62% 5% 24% 9%
Casinos 53% 4% 32% 11%
Betting on sport e.g. football, cricket 46% 4% 36% 14%
Betting on horse racing 37% 4% 47% 13%
Lotto 20% 4% 65% 11%

About two thirds of respondents think there should be more regulation of online gambling (68%) and poker machines (62%). 53% think that casinos need more regulation.

Differences by voting intention were –

  • Liberal/National voters were less likely to favour more regulation of casinos (47%) and poker machines (55%)
  • More regulation of poker machines was more strongly favoured by Greens (74%) and Labor (65%) voters.

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Opinion of Gambling Reforms

Apr 18, 2011

Q. The Federal Government has proposed gambling reforms which include “pre-commitment” technology that will require pokie players to have a card registered to their name and pre-programmed to prevent them losing more than a set amount in a 24-hour period. Do you support or oppose this measure? (Question commissioned by Network Ten)

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Men Women Age

18-34

Aged

35-54

Aged 55+
Total support 65% 76% 62% 75% 66% 65% 69% 66% 60%
Total oppose 21% 16% 28% 16% 23% 19% 12% 21% 32%
Strongly support 32% 42% 26% 42% 31% 33% 32% 34% 28%
Support 33% 34% 36% 33% 35% 32% 37% 32% 32%
Oppose 12% 10% 15% 11% 11% 13% 8% 11% 18%
Strongly oppose 9% 6% 13% 5% 12% 6% 4% 10% 14%
Don’t know 13% 8% 10% 8% 11% 16% 18% 13% 9%

Two thirds (65%) of respondents support The Federal Government’s proposed gambling reforms which include “pre-commitment” ” technology that will require pokie players to have a card registered to their name and pre-programmed to prevent them losing more than a set amount in a 24-hour period and 21% oppose.

Support is consistently above 60% across all voter and demographic groups. The highest support is from Labor voters (76%), Greens voters (75%) and those aged under 35 (69%). By income, support ranges from 61% for those on $600-$1,000 pw to 70% for those earning $1,600+ pw.

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Federal politics – voting intention

Apr 18, 2011

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

sample size =1,908

First preference/leaning to Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago 2 weeks ago Last week This week
Liberal 44% 43% 43% 43%
National 3% 3% 3% 3%
Total Lib/Nat 43.6 46% 46% 46% 47%
Labor 38.0 36% 36% 35% 35%
Greens 11.8 10% 10% 11% 11%
Other/Independent 6.6 8% 8% 8% 8%
2PP Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago 2 weeks ago Last week This week
Total Lib/Nat 49.9% 53% 53% 53% 54%
Labor 50.1% 47% 47% 47% 46%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election.

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Peace in the Middle East

Apr 18, 2011

Q. What, in your view, is the single biggest obstacle to peace in the Middle East?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Unwillingness of Israelis/ Palestinians to compromise 33% 38% 31% 37%
The Israeli (housing) settlements in areas which Palestinians claim for an independent Palestine 6% 6% 7% 14%
Israel’s oppression of Palestinians 8% 8% 8% 15%
Palestinian terror attacks on Israelis 5% 3% 7% 5%
Infighting between the various Palestinian organisations (e.g. Hamas and Fatah) 6% 5% 7% 4%
Inaction by the United Nations 3% 4% 3% 2%
Opposition to Israel from other Middle Eastern countries 8% 7% 9%
Don’t know 31% 29% 28% 23%

One third (33%) of respondents think that the unwillingness of Israelis and Palestinians to compromise is the single biggest obstacle to peace in the Middle East and a further one third (31%) do not know. The remaining 36% selected a range of reasons including Israel’s oppression of Palestinians (8%) and opposition to Israel from other Middle Eastern countries (8%).

There were few substantial differences across voter groups.

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Israel-Palestine Conflict

Apr 18, 2011

Q. To what extent, if at all, do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements?

Total agree Total disagree Total Neither/ Don’t know Strongly agree Agree Neither agree nor disagree Disagree Strongly disagree Don’t know
Australia should support the Israelis rather than Palestinians 14% 23% 62% 6% 8% 33% 12% 11% 29%
Being critical of Israel makes a person anti- Semitic 10% 46% 45% 4% 6% 23% 24% 22% 22%
The Palestine- Israel conflict fuels anti- Semitism in Australia 27% 24% 49% 5% 22% 24% 17% 7% 25%
The Palestine- Israel conflict fuels anti-Muslim feelings in Australia 31% 21% 48% 7% 24% 24% 16% 5% 24%

The most common answers to these statements on the Israel/Palestine conflict were ”neither agree nor disagree” and “don’t know”. These results indicate both a low level of awareness/interest and an inclination not to take a position one way or the other. The finding that only 14% agree that Australia should support the Israelis rather than Palestinians underlines this reluctance to take sides on this issue.

Views on most statements were split – except for 46% disagreement that “Being critical of Israel makes a person anti-Semitic”.

Respondents were slightly more likely to think the Israel/Palestine conflict fuels anti-Muslim feeling that anti-Semitism.

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Opinion of Carbon Pricing Proposal

Apr 18, 2011

Q. Do you support or oppose the Government’s recent announcement to introduce a carbon pricing scheme from 1 July 2012, which will require industries to pay a tax based on the amount of carbon pollution they emit?

7 March 14 March 28 March Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total support 35% 38% 34% 39% 63% 21% 75%
Total oppose 48% 49% 51% 49% 25% 72% 17%
Strongly support 9% 12% 12% 13% 25% 4% 37%
Support 26% 26% 22% 26% 38% 17% 38%
Oppose 19% 17% 19% 15% 10% 18% 10%
Strongly oppose 29% 32% 32% 34% 15% 54% 7%
Don’t know 18% 13% 15% 12% 12% 7% 8%

Support for the Government’s carbon pricing scheme has recovered to similar levels recorded in mid-March.

Since this question was asked 3 weeks ago, support has increased to 39% (+5%) and opposition dropped to 49% (-2%).

Strongest support was shown by those aged under 35 (42%) and those on incomes over $1,600 pw (46%).

Those most strongly opposed were aged 55+ (58%).

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