Important Decisions

Dec 12, 2011

Q. Which of the following decisions made by the Federal Labor Government since they were elected do you think is most important for Australia’s future? And which is second? And which is third?

First Second Third Total
The mining tax on large profits 17% 18% 13% 48%
Addressing climate change with the carbon tax 19% 11% 13% 43%
Increase compulsory superannuation to 12% 17% 13% 12% 42%
Provide 18 weeks paid parental leave 7% 6% 7% 20%
Childcare rebate increased from 30% to 50% 4% 7% 6% 17%
Allow Labor politicians to have a conscience vote on same-sex marriage 4% 6% 5% 15%
Allow the export of uranium to India 4% 5% 4% 13%
Gambling reforms which require poker machine players to set a limit on losses. 3% 5% 5% 13%
Plain packaging for cigarettes 3% 4% 5% 12%
None of them 13% 3% 3% 13%
Don’t know 8% 1% 2% 8%

The three most important decisions made by the Government were the mining tax, the carbon tax and the increase in compulsory superannuation.

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Pokies Legislation

Oct 10, 2011

Q. The Federal Government has proposed gambling reforms which include “pre-commitment” technology that will require pokies players to have a card registered to their name and pre-programmed to prevent them losing more than a set amount in a 24-hour period. Do you support or oppose this measure?

18 Apr 2011 12 Sept 2011 Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total support 65% 67% 61% 73% 52% 82%
Total oppose 21% 25% 30% 21% 41% 10%
Strongly support 32% 34% 29% 38% 20% 53%
Support 33% 33% 32% 35% 32% 29%
Oppose 12% 13% 15% 13% 20% 5%
Strongly oppose 9% 12% 15% 8% 21% 5%
Don’t know 13% 9% 9% 6% 7% 8%

The majority of respondents support the proposed gambling reforms to include pre-commitment technology on pokies machines around Australia.

However, support for the reform has fallen 6 points to 61% this week, with opposition climbing from 25% to 30% at the same time.

Greens voters are the most likely to support the reform (82%) followed by Labor voters (73%).    Whilst Coalition voters were the least likely to do so, the majority of them nonetheless support the reforms (52%).

Looking at the responses by age, respondents aged 18-24 are the most likely to support the reforms (74%) whilst those aged 55-64 are the most likely to oppose them (42%).

Looking are responses by state and territory, respondents in NSW are the most likely to oppose the reforms, with 37% stating they are either strongly opposed or opposed to the proposed legislation.

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