Party trusted to handle another GFC

Oct 15, 2013

Q. The shutdown of the US Government has sparked fears of another global recession.

If there was another Global Financial Crisis, which party would you trust most to deal with it?

 

%

 

Lib/Nat voters

Labor voters

Green voters

 

15 Aug 2011

7 May 2012

29 Jan 2103

The Liberal Party

38%

78%

6%

5%

40%

42%

40%

The Labor Party

29%

4%

68%

39%

31%

25%

26%

No Difference

23%

13%

16%

47%

20%

23%

22%

Don’t know

10%

5%

9%

9%

9%

10%

11%

If there was another GFC, 38% of people would trust the Liberal Party most to deal with it. 29% trusted Labor while 23% said there was no difference.

Trust generally followed party lines, with 78% of Lib/Nat voters selecting the Liberals and 68% of Labor voters selecting Labor. 47% of Green voters selected ‘no difference’.

The overall figures are generally in line with those from 2011, 2012 and early in 2013.

Reasons economy is poor

Apr 8, 2013

Q. What is the main reason you don’t think the state of the economy is good? *

 

28 May 12

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Poor economic management by Government

27%

40%

17%

52%

Increasing cost of living

34%

27%

41%

22%

Businesses are struggling

13%

11%

7%

13%

Increasing gap between rich and poor

9%

7%

15%

3%

Incomes aren’t increasing fast enough to keep up

7%

6%

7%

5%

Global financial problems

7%

5%

7%

4%

Other reason

2%

3%

6%

2%

Don’t know

1%

1%

* Based on those who disagree that economy is good.

Those who disagreed that the economy was good said the main reasons were poor economic management by Government (40%) and the increasing cost of living (27%). Those who blame poor economic management by the Government has increased 13% and cost of living has decreased 7% since May last year.

62% of respondents aged 55+ blamed poor economic management by Government while the increasing cost of living was the major factor for 41% of respondents aged 25-44.

The Australian economy

Jan 29, 2013

Q. Thinking about the state of the world economy, how do you think the Australian economy has performed over the last few years compared to other countries?

 

15 Aug 11

7 May 12

Total 29 Jan 13

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total better

70%

66%

70%

84%

64%

71%

Total worse

10%

15%

12%

5%

16%

10%

A lot better

31%

29%

29%

45%

18%

35%

A little better

39%

37%

41%

39%

46%

36%

About the same

16%

16%

16%

10%

19%

17%

A little worse

7%

9%

7%

3%

9%

6%

A lot worse

3%

6%

5%

2%

7%

4%

Don’t know

3%

3%

3%

2%

1%

2%

70% think that Australia’s economy has performed better than other countries over the last few years, 16% say about the same and 12% think it has been worse. This represents a shift from net +51 to net +58 since this question was previously asked in May last year.

There were no substantial differences across demographic groups although those on lower incomes were a little more likely to believe it has performed worse – for those on income under $600pw, 56% think Australia’s economy has performed better and 20% worse.

Trust to deal with GFC

Jan 29, 2013

Q. If there was another Global Financial Crisis, which party would you trust most to deal with it?

 

15 Aug 11

7 May 12

Total 29 Jan 13

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

The Labor Party

31%

25%

26%

68%

2%

23%

The Liberal Party

40%

42%

40%

4%

84%

6%

No difference

20%

23%

22%

18%

10%

52%

Don’t know

9%

10%

11%

10%

4%

19%

If there was another GFC, 40% would trust the Liberal Party more to handle it and 26% would trust the Labor Party more. This represents a slight shift to the Labor Party from net -17% to net -14% since May last year.

The Liberal Party was rated higher than Labor with all demographic groups except for low income earners – 35% of those earning under $600pw would trust the Labor Party more and 29% the Liberal Party. Those most likely to trust the Liberal Party more were aged 55+ (52%), full-time workers (45%) and income over $1,600 pw (44%).

Decisions of the Labor Government

Sep 10, 2012

Q. Thinking about the decisions the Labor Government has made over the last few years, do you think the following decisions were good or bad for Australia?

Total good

Total bad

Very good

Good

Neither good nor bad

Bad

Very bad

Don’t know

Expanding dental health services for people on low incomes

77%

5%

33%

44%

14%

2%

3%

5%

Increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,200

75%

4%

36%

39%

16%

3%

1%

5%

Increasing the age pension

70%

11%

30%

40%

13%

7%

4%

6%

Increasing superannuation from 9% to 12%

68%

9%

27%

41%

16%

6%

3%

6%

Protecting large areas of Australia’s marine environment in a network of marine reserves

67%

8%

28%

39%

20%

5%

3%

7%

Introducing the National Disability Insurance Scheme

58%

5%

21%

37%

23%

3%

2%

14%

Implementing the recommendations of the Gonski report to increase education funding

54%

8%

20%

34%

25%

5%

3%

13%

Stimulus spending to tackle the Global Financial Crisis (GFC)

54%

22%

22%

32%

18%

14%

8%

8%

Spending on new school buildings during the GFC

53%

22%

15%

38%

18%

12%

10%

6%

Paid parental leave

52%

20%

17%

35%

23%

12%

8%

5%

Introducing a tax on large profits of mining companies

49%

25%

24%

25%

17%

13%

12%

8%

Implementing the recommendations of the expert committee on asylum seekers including offshore processing

45%

15%

15%

30%

28%

8%

7%

12%

Building the NBN (National Broadband Network)

43%

28%

17%

26%

22%

14%

14%

7%

Abolished WorkChoices

42%

27%

23%

19%

19%

17%

10%

12%

Introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change

28%

51%

14%

14%

15%

16%

35%

7%

The two most popular decisions of the Labor Government are ‘expanding dental health services for people on low incomes’ (77% total good) and ‘increasing the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,000 (75% total good).   The least popular decisions were ‘Building the NBN’ (43% total good), ‘Abolished WorkChoices’ (42% total good) and ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’ (28% total good).

Of the fifteen decisions put to respondents, the majority of respondents believed that 10 of the 15 decisions were good for Australia.  For the remaining 5 decisions, a larger portion of respondents generally regarded the decision to be good for Australia except for ‘introducing a carbon tax to tackle climate change’, where the majority of respondents (51%) believed it to be bad for Australia.

Female respondents were more likely to endorse the dental health reforms (80% total good) compared with male respondents (74% total good).

Increasing the age pension was most strongly supported by respondents aged 65+ (77% total good).

Introducing paid parental leave was more popular with female respondents (57% total good), compared with male respondents (46% total good).  Looking at this decision by age, it was most popular amongst respondents aged 25-34 (62%) and 35-44 (62%) whereas respondents aged 65+ were the most likely to regard the decision as a bad one (36% total bad).

Implementing the recommendations of the expert committee on asylum seekers including offshore processing proved to be a very popular decision amongst respondents aged 65+ (65% total good), whereas respondents aged 25-34 were the most likely to regard it as a bad decision (43% total bad).

Female respondents were more likely to regard ‘protecting large areas of Australia’s marine environment’ as a good decision (72% total good) compared with male respondents (60% total good).

Impact on Australia of European Economic Crisis

Jul 9, 2012

Q. How much impact do you think the current economic and financial problems in Europe have on the Australian economy— a major impact, some impact, only a small impact or no impact?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

A major impact

14%

12%

18%

8%

Some impact

60%

61%

65%

55%

Only a small impact

16%

18%

12%

24%

No impact

3%

2%

1%

6%

Don’t know

7%

7%

3%

6%

14% think the financial and economic problems in Europe have a major impact on the Australian economy and 60% think they have some impact. Only 19% think they have only a small or no impact.

82% of respondents aged 55+ and 83% of Liberal/National voters think they have major/some impact.

Those most likely to think they have only a small or no impact were aged under 35 (23%) and Greens voters (30%).

Of those who had heard or read a lot about the problems in Europe, 26% think they have a major impact on the Australian economy and 58% think they have some impact.

Trust to Deal with Global Economic Problems

Jul 9, 2012

Q. Who do you trust most to deal effectively with global economic problems – Julia Gillard and the Labor Party or Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Julia Gillard and the Labor Party

32%

80%

3%

68%

Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party

42%

3%

84%

11%

Don’t know

26%

17%

13%

21%

42% would trust Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party more to deal effectively with global economic problems and 32% would trust Julia Gillard and the Labor Party more.

Those more likely to trust Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party were aged 55+ (51%), full-time workers (46%) and income $1,600+ pw (48%).

Respondents earning less than $1,000 pw were more likely to trust Julia Gillard and the Labor Party  (39%) than Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party (35%).

Of those who had heard or read a lot about the crisis in Europe, 46% would trust Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party more to deal effectively with global economic problems and 41% would trust Julia Gillard and the Labor Party more.

Are we a nation of financial dunces?

Jul 3, 2012



Ian Silk shares some frightening statistics about our lack of literacy when it comes to super and investing.

At a time when people are being asked to make more financial decisions than ever before, study after study shows the vast majority are overwhelmed by increasingly complex transactions.. It’s a startling fact for a country with the greatest number of shareholders in the world.

When it comes to super, as many as 43% of people rate themselves as having “none” (8%) or “only minimal” (35%) levels of knowledge about superannuation. CEO of AustralianSuper Ian Silk explains why one solution to start financial education at school level and embed the basic concepts could be the answer.

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