Party Trust to Handle Issues

Oct 6, 2015

Q: Which party would you trust most to handle the following issues?

  Liberal Labor Greens Don’t know   Difference   Difference

Sep 2015

Management of the economy 41% 23% 4% 32% +18 +16
Ensuring a quality education for all children 28% 35% 7% 30% -7 -4
Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system 28% 33% 8% 30% -5 -2
Protecting the environment 18% 16% 39% 26% -21 -20
A fair industrial relations system 27% 38% 5% 30% -11 -8
Political leadership 38% 20% 7% 36% +18 +9
Addressing climate change 19% 23% 31% 27% -12 -12
Controlling interest rates 36% 22% 4% 37% +14 +16
Australian jobs and protection of local industries 28% 35% 6% 31% -7 -5
Ensuring a quality water supply 25% 20% 24% 31% +5 +7
Housing affordability 24% 31% 7% 38% -7
Ensuring a fair taxation system 31% 31% 6% 32% +4
Security and the war on terrorism 41% 19% 5% 36% +22 +20
Treatment of asylum seekers 28% 21% 17% 34% +7 +12
Managing population growth 32% 19% 9% 40% +13 +11

Note – Differences are calculated by subtracting Labor % from Liberal % – except for the two issues on which the Greens lead in which case it is Liberal minus Greens.

The Liberal Party is trusted more to handle security and the war on terrorism (+22), management of the economy (+18), political leadership (+18) and controlling interest rates (+14). The Labor Party is trusted more to handle a fair industrial relations system (-11) and Australian jobs, protection of local industries (-7), ensuring a quality education (-7) and housing affordability (-7).

Main changes since this question was asked last month have been an improvement for the Liberal Party on political leadership (up net 9 points), and improvement for the Labor Party on housing affordability (up 7) and treatment of asylum seekers (up 5).

Most important election issues

Apr 22, 2014

Q.  Which are the three most important issues in deciding how you would vote at a Federal election?

 

Total

22 Apr 14

 

Vote ALP

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Grn

Vote other

 

23 Jul 13

30 Jul 12

6 June 11

25 Jan 10

Management of the economy

54%

43%

75%

22%

44%

45%

64%

61%

63%

Ensuring a quality education for all children

27%

35%

18%

38%

20%

25%

26%

26%

23%

Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system

50%

54%

43%

62%

52%

42%

47%

49%

48%

Protecting the environment

13%

12%

7%

42%

14%

12%

11%

15%

16%

A fair industrial relations system

12%

17%

11%

8%

12%

10%

12%

8%

na

Political leadership

15%

11%

24%

6%

13%

21%

25%

17%

23%

Addressing climate change

10%

13%

4%

28%

9%

11%

9%

15%

16%

Controlling interest rates

9%

9%

11%

2%

7%

13%

9%

13%

15%

Australian jobs and protection of local industries

37%

39%

37%

18%

37%

39%

41%

32%

33%

Ensuring a quality water supply

4%

5%

3%

3%

5%

3%

3%

5%

12%

Housing affordability

17%

18%

16%

13%

19%

17%

13%

16%

14%

Ensuring a fair taxation system

20%

19%

20%

9%

23%

20%

18%

17%

14%

Security and the war on terrorism

5%

3%

8%

3%

5%

8%

5%

8%

9%

Treatment of asylum seekers

8%

5%

5%

32%

9%

14%

10%

5%

na

Managing population growth

9%

6%

10%

8%

16%

9%

8%

12%

na

54% of people surveyed rated management of the economy as one of their three most important issues, followed by 50% ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system, 37% Australian jobs and protection of local industries and 27% ensuring a quality education for all children.

Main changes since this question was asked last July – management of the economy up 9%, ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system up 8%, political leadership down 6% and treatment of asylum seekers down 6%.

Expectations of a Liberal/National Government

Feb 25, 2013

Q. If the Labor Party lost the next election, do you think the following would be better or worse under a Liberal/National Government led by Tony Abbott?

 

A lot better

A little better

Stay much the same

A little worse

A lot worse

Don’t use

NET (Better-Worse)

Political leadership

16%

19%

27%

10%

24%

4%

+1

Trust in Government

13%

19%

29%

12%

22%

4%

-2

Unemployment

7%

18%

39%

13%

19%

5%

-7

The economy overall

16%

22%

31%

12%

16%

4%

+10

The cost of living

6%

19%

36%

14%

21%

4%

-10

Interest rates

5%

13%

48%

14%

16%

5%

-12

Health services

6%

19%

36%

16%

20%

4%

-11

Job security

7%

17%

36%

14%

22%

4%

-12

Workers rights and conditions

5%

13%

37%

15%

25%

5%

-22

Company profits

13%

28%

37%

6%

10%

6%

+25

The environment

5%

13%

47%

11%

21%

4%

-14

Job creation

8%

20%

39%

13%

16%

4%

-1

Public services

6%

15%

42%

13%

20%

4%

-12

Benefits for people on Government support – such as pensioners and the unemployed

5%

13%

39%

16%

23%

5%

-21

Your personal financial situation

6%

16%

42%

15%

16%

4%

-9

Under a Liberal Government, respondents though that the economy overall (+10) and company profits (+25) would be better.

However they were more likely to think that workers rights and conditions (-22), benefits for people on Government support  (-21), the environment (-14), interest rates (-12), job security (-12), public services, health services (-11) and the cost of living (-10) would all be worse. 22% think their own financial situation will be better, 31% think it will be worse and 42% much the same.

Do we undervalue our public sector innovations?

Sep 11, 2012


Nadine Flood questions whether governments take our science and other publicly funded breakthroughs for granted.

The CSIRO is one of Australia’s most respected institutions. The Bureau of Meteorology is crucial in times of impending climate crisis. They are also part of the public service. And though their specialty is science, other areas of the public sector are also responsible for innovation — from agricultural land use to new ways of fighting tax evasion.

See a brief history of CSIRO achievements from wi-fi to dollar notes.

It’s a concept that is often lost at Budget time when governments keen to trim down costs often take a knife to the public sector. It’s easy pickings if the millions of dollars saved or made by innovations in technology, energy and health fail to be counted as assets.

The CPSU’s Nadine Flood tells 3Q how the CSIRO’s development of wi-fi technology transformed the world and brought $500 million into Australia through patent fees. Yet if the Opposition has its way, crucial funding of the sciences and other public sector innovation would be lost.
Further cuts on the grounds of “efficiency” will have long term effects on our ability to innovate.

Do public health campaigns work?

May 1, 2012


Dr Brian Owler gives his reasons for fronting a road safety campaign and the next issues in his sights.

The AIDS awareness campaign was the first graphic public health campaign of its kind — the Grim Reaper playing ten pin bowling with children, parents and old people.

Since then there’s been dozens more, targeting everything from anti-smoking to domestic violence. Associate professor Brian Owler is the face of the RTA’s “Choose Wisely” campaign.

He rejects the suggestion that these ads constitute a “nanny state” agenda and tells 3Q why more needs to be done on issues like building and pool safety in order to protect children.

Taking Sick Days

Mar 26, 2012

Q. Which of the following apply to you over the last 12 months?

 

Total

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

I have taken a sickie (that is, a day off work when you weren’t really sick)

23%

23%

22%

30%

21%

8%

 I have taken a day off sick without a doctor’s certificate

51%

49%

52%

55%

53%

34%

I have taken a day off sick with a doctor’s certificate

47%

49%

44%

49%

49%

33%

I have gone to work when I was sick

81%

83%

78%

83%

82%

70%

* based of those who worked in paid employment over the last 12 months

More than three times as many respondents said that, over the last 12 months, they had worked when they were sick than had taken a “sickie”. 81% said they had gone to work when they were sick and 23% said they had taken a day off work when they weren’t really sick.

Men (83%) were a little more likely than women (78%) to go to work when they were sick.

Those aged under 35 were a little more likely to take a “sickie” (30%) but were also more likely to go to work when they were sick (83%).

Older respondents seem to be less likely to get sick at all – 70% said they had worked when sick – and only 34% had taken a day off with a doctor’s certificate and 33% without a doctor’s certificate.

Comments »

Private Health Insurance Rebate

Feb 20, 2012

Q. The Government proposes to means test the private health insurance rebate, with reductions beginning for a single person earning more than $80,000 or families on $160,000. Singles earning more than $124,000 and families on more than $248,000 will not receive any of the rebate. Do you support or oppose means testing the heath insurance rebate for people on higher incomes?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Income less than $31,200 Income $31,200-$51,999 Income $52,000-$83,199 Income $83,200+
Total support 53% 76% 38% 65% 67% 63% 59% 45%
Total oppose 33% 13% 51% 19% 17% 23% 28% 46%
Strongly support 22% 46% 8% 22% 33% 23% 23% 21%
Support 31% 30% 30% 43% 34% 40% 36% 24%
Oppose 15% 9% 21% 13% 10% 12% 14% 19%
Strongly oppose 18% 4% 30% 6% 7% 11% 14% 27%
Don’t know 14% 11% 11% 15% 15% 15% 12% 10%

The majority of respondents support the means test on the private health insurance rebate for people on higher incomes (53%), with 33% opposed to the reform.

Those on low incomes of less than $31,200 per annum are the most likely to be in favour of the reform, with 67% supporting the means test.  Conversely, those on higher incomes (earning $83,200+ per annum) are the most likely to oppose the means test, with 46% against it and 45% in favour of it.

Looking at the results by voting intention, those most likely to be against the reform are Coalition voters with the majority opposing the means test (51%), whilst Labor voters are the most likely to be in favour of it (76%).  Greens voters trail 11 points behind Labor in favour of the reform at 65%.

Comments »

Awareness of Changes to Health System

Aug 22, 2011

Q. How much have you read and heard about the recent Federal Government changes concerning funding and delivery of health services?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
A lot 8% 10% 8% 16%
Something 21% 22% 24% 19%
A little 36% 38% 37% 32%
Nothing 28% 25% 28% 30%
Don’t know 7% 5% 4% 3%

Only 29% say they have heard a lot or something about the recent Federal Government changes concerning funding and delivery of health services, 36% say they have heard a little and 28% have heard nothing.

Those most likely to have heard a lot/something were aged 55+ (39%).

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