Cost of housing

Jun 10, 2015

Q. Thinking about housing prices, do you think increases in the cost of housing are good or bad for the following?

Total good

Total bad

Very good

Good

Neither good nor bad

Bad

Very bad

Don’t know

Home owners

49%

21%

13%

36%

24%

14%

7%

5%

Investors

46%

22%

14%

32%

24%

15%

7%

8%

You personally

25%

36%

7%

18%

34%

17%

19%

5%

The economy

23%

36%

2%

21%

31%

24%

12%

9%

The average Australian

13%

57%

2%

11%

25%

36%

21%

5%

First home buyers

9%

74%

2%

7%

13%

32%

42%

5%

Nearly half think that increases in the cost of housing are good for home owners (49%) and investors (46%).
74% think increases are bad for first home buyers and more than half (57%) think they are bad for the average Australian.

Respondents were divided over whether increases in housing costs are good or bad for the economy – but are somewhat more likely to think they are bad (36%) or neither (31%).

Only 25% see increases as being good for themselves personally.

Most important election issues

Jul 23, 2013

Q.  Which are the three most important issues in deciding how you would vote at a Federal election?

 

Total

23 Jul 13

 

Total

17 Jun 13

11 Feb 13

19 Nov 12

30 Jul 12

5 Dec 11

6 June 11

25 Jan 10

Management of the economy

45%

47%

62%

66%

64%

62%

61%

63%

Ensuring a quality education for all children

25%

25%

29%

35%

26%

22%

26%

23%

Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system

42%

45%

52%

57%

47%

47%

49%

48%

Protecting the environment

12%

13%

14%

14%

11%

13%

15%

16%

A fair industrial relations system

10%

10%

12%

8%

12%

11%

8%

na

Political leadership

21%

22%

14%

15%

25%

18%

17%

23%

Addressing climate change

11%

11%

9%

9%

9%

10%

15%

16%

Controlling interest rates

13%

11%

9%

11%

9%

11%

13%

15%

Australian jobs and protection of local industries

39%

34%

40%

32%

41%

36%

32%

33%

Ensuring a quality water supply

3%

5%

4%

5%

3%

4%

5%

12%

Housing affordability

17%

14%

11%

14%

13%

13%

16%

14%

Ensuring a fair taxation system

20%

19%

21%

17%

18%

16%

17%

14%

Security and the war on terrorism

8%

8%

6%

5%

5%

4%

8%

9%

Treatment of asylum seekers

14%

11%

6%

6%

10%

8%

5%

na

Managing population growth

9%

11%

9%

7%

8%

8%

12%

na

45% of people surveyed rated management of the economy as one of their three most important issues, followed by 42% ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system, 39% Australian jobs and protection of local industries and 25% ensuring a quality education for all children.

There has been little change since this question was asked last month – Australian jobs and protection of local industries is up 5 points to 39% and treatment of asylum seekers is up 3 points (and up 8 points since February) to 14%.

Changes in cost of living

Feb 5, 2013

Q. Compared to two or three years ago is your household paying more or less for the following –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paying a lot more

 

Paying a lot more

Paying a little more

Paying about the same

Paying a little less

Paying a lot less

Don’t know

Own home outright

Own home with mortgage

Renting

Petrol

50%

33%

11%

2%

1%

4%

44%

49%

55%

Fresh food – fruit, vegetables, meat

36%

43%

16%

4%

*

2%

33%

35%

41%

Packaged food

28%

39%

24%

4%

*

4%

26%

27%

33%

Electricity and gas

70%

22%

4%

1%

1%

2%

69%

73%

71%

Housing – mortgage or rent

24%

22%

29%

10%

3%

12%

10%

21%

40%

Insurance

43%

36%

14%

1%

1%

5%

48%

47%

35%

Water

47%

32%

14%

1%

1%

6%

48%

54%

38%

Clothing

21%

30%

37%

9%

1%

2%

17%

21%

25%

Education

24%

20%

27%

3%

3%

23%

15%

28%

26%

Medical, dental

33%

33%

27%

2%

*

3%

33%

35%

34%

Items which respondents said they were “paying a lot more” for were electricity and gas (70%), petrol (50%), water (47%) and insurance (43%).

Homeowners had similar responses to the total sample, but the main things renters were paying a lot more for were electricity and gas (71%), petrol (55%), fresh food (41%) and housing (40%).

Are we ready for the grey revolution?

Sep 12, 2012


Ken Morrison says our cities need to be transformed for our ageing population – and it’s not solely about nursing homes.

By 2050 Australia will have a population of 35 million – almost a quarter of whom will be over 65. And while we are ageing, our cities are growing. It’s not just aged care facilities and health care which will be under pressure but our cities as a whole — transport, outdoor spaces, housing, information access and security.

The Property Council’s Ken Morrison tells 3Q the problem is not isolated to the lack of nursing home places. With a declining tax base and a burgeoning number of elderly, the pressures on all tiers of government will be immense which is why making cities function now is more important than ever.
Read his blog about age friendly cities.

As the Government promotes its policy of the elderly staying in their homes for longer, the Property Council is part of an organisation lobbying for all new homes to be built to universal design standards by 2020.

Read about the partnership between the Property Council, government and other organisations.

By building a house to last its occupants’ lifetimes, despite illness or disability, we will all be able to live independently for longer. Universal design ideas are already being implemented in Japan, Britain, Canada and Norway.

Hello? Context, Please–Housing Is Not a Pretty Picture

Jul 4, 2012

I’ll bet this happens to every person at least, say, once a week: you read something in the newspaper (that’s the thing that you actually hold in your hand and leaf through–I’m just practicing an explanation I’ll need to use with young people in ten years) but it bears no relation to what you see happening in YOUR real life. If you are aching for that feeling, you only need read most coverage of economics–as in a column today in the Sydney Morning Herald.

Ross Gittins, who I hasten to say is relatively sane compared to the free market, knuckle-draggers who write about economics and business over at The Australian and The Fin, muses about housing prices today. Here are his two key points:

FOR years when people at dinner parties worried about houses becoming too expensive for the younger generation to afford, I used to tell them not to worry: it was logically impossible for prices to rise to a level no one could afford. Why do I remind you of this? Because it’s starting to look like I was right.

And, then, at the end:

I take the present small falls in house prices as a sign the limits to affordability have been reached, and won’t be exceeded.

As a matter of supply and demand, Gittins might be right: prices may not be going dramatically higher. But, c’mon, “limits to affordability”? You got to be kiddin?

The real world is explained by our friends at the Australians for Affordable Housing. To wit:

  • Almost one in ten households is in housing stress
  • On any given night over 105,000 people in Australia are homeless
  • Both house prices and rents have risen well above inflation. For people on low incomes this means that housing costs are eating up more of their income and leaving less for the other essentials in life. [emphasis added]

So, my problem with Gittins’ column is really context. It’s a bit misleading to wax on and on about how terrific it is that housing prices aren’t skyrocketing without balancing that with an insight into the real life people face trying to actually find housing, whether buying or renting.

Context, context, context!!!


@jonathantasini

Important Issues

Jul 19, 2010

Q. Which are the three most important issues in deciding how you would vote at a Federal election?

  First Second Third Total Total

10 May 10

Difference
Management of the economy 38% 18% 7% 63% 62% +1%
Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system  16% 20% 19% 55% 50% +5%
Australian jobs and protection of local industries 7% 8% 9% 24% 29% -5%
Ensuring a quality education for all children 4% 11% 9% 24% 19% +5%
Ensuring a fair taxation system 4% 6% 8% 18% 22% -4%
Protecting the environment 5% 5% 5% 15% 13% +2%
Political leadership 6% 3% 4% 13% 12% +1%
Housing affordability 4% 4% 5% 13% 17% -4%
Addressing climate change 4% 4% 4% 12% 12%
Controlling interest rates 3% 5% 4% 12% 16% -4%
Managing population growth 1% 4% 7% 12% 14% -2%
Treatment of asylum seekers 4% 3% 4% 11% *  
A fair industrial relations system 2% 4% 5% 11% 9% +2%
Security and the war on terrorism 1% 2% 5% 8% 7% +1%
Ensuring a quality water supply 1% 1% 4% 6% 7% -1%

*Not asked in May 2010 poll

The most important election issues were management of the economy, the quality of the health system, jobs and local industry and a quality education for all children.

Since this issue was last polled in May, health and education have increased in importance (both +5%) and Australian jobs and protection of local industry declined 5%. Comments »

Party best at Handling Issues

Jul 19, 2010

Q. And which party would you trust most to handle the following issues?

  Labor Liberal Greens Don’t know
A fair industrial relations system 45% 24% 5% 26%
Ensuring a quality education for all children 41% 25% 4% 29%
Australian jobs and protection of local industries 42% 28% 3% 27%
Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system  38% 27% 4% 31%
Ensuring a fair taxation system 36% 28% 4% 32%
Housing affordability 30% 24% 4% 41%
Political leadership 33% 30% 5% 33%
Ensuring a quality water supply 23% 23% 22% 32%
Managing population growth 24% 27% 9% 40%
Security and the war on terrorism 25% 30% 3% 42%
Management of the economy 32% 38% 3% 27%
Treatment of asylum seekers 23% 29% 11% 37%
Controlling interest rates 28% 35% 2% 35%
Addressing climate change 18% 16% 36% 29%
Protecting the environment 17% 13% 47% 23%

 Labor have a substantial lead over the Liberal Party as the best party to handle a fair industrial relations system (+21%), quality education for all (+16%), Australian jobs and protection of industries (+14%) and ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system (+11%).

 The Liberal Party’s main strengths were controlling interest rates (+7%), treatment of asylum seekers (+6%) and management of the economy  (+6%).

The Greens were thought to be the best party for protecting the environment (47%) and addressing climate change (36%). Comments »

Important Election Issues

May 10, 2010

Q8. Which are the three most important issues in deciding how you would vote at a Federal election? (Number from 1 to 3 where 1 is the most important, 2 the second most important, etc)

  One Two Three Total Total

25 Jan 10

Difference
Management of the economy 34% 18% 10% 62% 63% -1%
Ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system  14% 20% 16% 50% 48% +2%
Australian jobs and protection of local industries 8% 10% 11% 29% 33% -4%
Ensuring a fair taxation system 5% 8% 9% 22% 18% +4%
Ensuring a quality education for all children 3% 7% 9% 19% 23% -4%
Housing affordability 6% 5% 6% 17% 14% +3%
Controlling interest rates 5% 5% 6% 16% 15% +1%
Managing population growth 3% 4% 7% 14% *  
Protecting the environment 3% 5% 5% 13% 16% -3%
Political leadership 5% 3% 4% 12% 23% -11%
Addressing climate change 4% 4% 4% 12% 16% -4%
Fair immigration policies 3% 4% 3% 10% *  
A fair industrial relations system 2% 4% 3% 9% 10% -1%
Ensuring a quality water supply 2% 2% 3% 7% 12% -5%
Security and the war on terrorism 2% 2% 3% 7% 9% -2%

*Not asked in January 2010 poll

 62% of people surveyed rate management of the economy is one of their three most important issues, followed by 50% that rate ensuring the quality of Australia’s health system and 29% that rate Australian jobs and protection of local industries as one of their three most important issues.

 Only 9% rate a fair industrial relations system as one of their three most important issues and 7% rate security and the war on terrorism and ensuring a quality water supply. 

 The major change since the previous survey in January, was a drop in the importance of political leadership from 23% to 12%. Ensuring a fairer tax system has risen slightly from 18% to 22%. Comments »

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