Human rights obligations

Mar 17, 2015

Q. How concerned are you that Australia has been criticised by the United Nations for failing to meet its international human rights obligations in the treatment of asylum seekers? 

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote Other

Total concerned

44%

59%

23%

83%

40%

Total not concerned

48%

33%

71%

14%

58%

Very concerned

21%

28%

7%

64%

21%

Somewhat concerned

23%

31%

16%

19%

19%

Not very concerned

19%

15%

24%

11%

22%

Not at all concerned

29%

18%

47%

3%

36%

Don’t know

9%

7%

6%

3%

3%

44% were concerned that Australia has been criticised by the United Nations for failing to meet its international human rights obligations in the treatment of asylum seekers and 48% were not concerned.

Those most likely to be concerned were Labor voters (59%), Greens voters (83%), aged 18-34 (56%) and university educated (52%).

Those most likely to be not  concerned were Liberal/National voters (71%) and aged 55+ (63%).

Australia and United States – How they compare

Oct 15, 2012

Q. How do you think Australia compares to the United States on the following: 

 

Total better in Australia

Total better in USA

A lot better in Australia

A little better in Australia

About the same

A little better in USA

A lot better in USA

Don’t know

Access to health care

82%

5%

61%

21%

8%

3%

2%

5%

Standard of living for ordinary working people

74%

7%

40%

34%

13%

5%

2%

6%

Access to jobs

70%

5%

34%

36%

17%

4%

1%

7%

Public safety

66%

4%

32%

34%

22%

3%

1%

7%

Wages

64%

9%

34%

30%

17%

7%

2%

10%

Work rights

63%

7%

34%

29%

18%

5%

2%

13%

Education standards

47%

16%

20%

27%

27%

12%

4%

10%

Rights of individuals

44%

14%

19%

25%

34%

10%

4%

8%

Opportunities to succeed in business

35%

22%

14%

21%

32%

16%

6%

12%

International influence

17%

56%

8%

9%

19%

21%

35%

9%

The vast majority of respondents think health care, standard of living, access to jobs, public safety, wages and work rights are better in Australia than in the US.

They are somewhat less certain about education standards, individual rights and opportunities to succeed in business – but still think these are better in Australia.

Only on international influence did respondents favour the US.

Why has the UN accused Australia of failing children?

Jul 3, 2012


Norman Gillespie says Australia broke its promise to the UN to take children out of detention centres.

Last month the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child gave its five yearly report card on Australia’s children and the findings were not good — especially regarding our treatment of asylum seeking children.

UNICEF Australia’s CEO Norman Gillespie tells 3Q that the UN’s recommendation seven years ago to release these children into the community has been ignored with over 400 children still in detention. He hopes the recent announcement to appoint a National Children’s Commissioner will ensure Australian meets its obligations for children seeking asylum and all children who continue to fall through the gaps.

International Trade

Nov 28, 2011

Q. Should another country’s political system and human rights record influence Australia’s trade with that country or should we trade with any country regardless of their political system or human rights record?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Political system and human rights record should influence trade 66% 71% 64% 83%
Should trade with any country 18% 18% 24% 9%
Don’t know 16% 11% 13% 7%

66% believe that another country’s political system and human rights record should influence Australia’s trade with that country and 18% think we should trade with any country regardless of their political system or human rights record.

The position that political system and human rights record should influence trade was supported by 75% of women and 57% of men.

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Features of a good refugee processing system in Australia

Sep 26, 2011

Q. Thinking about asylum seekers arriving in Australia, how important do you think each of the following features are for a good refugee processing system?

Very important Important Not very important Not at all important Don’t know Total Important Total Not Important
Stopping the boats 52% 22% 11% 8% 7% 74% 19%
Keeping costs down 47% 34% 11% 2% 6% 81% 13%
Protecting human rights 42% 38% 9% 5% 6% 80% 14%
Avoiding prolonged detention 35% 33% 13% 12% 8% 68% 25%
Making sure children have their claims processed in Australia 26% 32% 18% 13% 11% 58% 31%
Allowing Australian courts to review claims 22% 34% 16% 16% 12% 56% 32%
Approval from the United Nations 22% 32% 20% 16% 11% 54% 36%
Making sure asylum seekers are not returned to the countries they have fled 20% 29% 18% 20% 13% 49% 38%

Please note: ‘Total Important’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘Very Important’ and ‘Important’ together.  ‘Total Not Important’ is an aggregate figure that has been achieved by adding ‘Not very important’ and ‘Not at all important’ together.

The most important feature of a ‘good refugee processing system’ is ‘keeping the costs down’, with 81% of respondents regarding this to be either very important or important, followed by ‘protecting human rights’ (80% total important).

Seventy four per cent (74%) of respondents believed that ‘stopping the boats’ is an important feature and 68% regard ‘avoiding prolonged detention’ to be an important feature.

Amongst the least important features of a good refugee processing system is ‘approval from the United Nations’, with only 54% regarding this to be important and 36% viewing it as not important.

Making sure asylum seekers are not returned to the countries they have fled was the least important attribute, with only 49% believing it to be important and 38% regarding it as not important.

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