Federal politics – voting intention

Mar 15, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1,908 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 35%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 38% 44% -2%
Labor 45% 56% +2%
Greens 9%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 6%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Parental leave policy

Mar 15, 2010

Q. The Opposition leader Tony Abbott has proposed a scheme to give new parents 26 weeks leave at their normal rate of pay to be paid for by a 1.7 per cent levy on large companies. The Rudd Government plans to introduce a scheme to give new parents 18 weeks leave at the minimum wage rate paid for by the Government. Which scheme do you support more?

  %
The Government’s scheme 40%
The Opposition’s scheme 24%
Neither 27%
Don’t know 10%

40% of respondents supported the Government parent leave scheme, 24% supported the Opposition’s scheme and 27% supported neither.

Among labor voters, 61% supported the Government scheme and 15% supported the Opposition’s. However, only 37% of Coalition voters supported the Opposition’s scheme – 20% supported the Government scheme and 35% supported neither.

 Young people were more likely to support the Opposition’s scheme – of those aged under 35, 35% supported the Opposition’s scheme and 39% the Government’s. Older respondents were more likely to support neither scheme – of those aged 45-64, 36% supported neither scheme, 42% the Government scheme and 14% the Opposition’s. Men and women showed similar levels of support. Comments »

Attributes of the Liberal Party

Mar 15, 2010

Q. And which statements do you feel fit the Liberal Party? 

  6 July 09 14 Mar 10

 

% change
Will promise to do anything to win votes 67% 72% +5%
Divided 74% 66% -8%
Out of touch with ordinary people 62% 58% -4%
Moderate 50% 50%
Professional in its approach 41% 47% +6%
Too dominated by its leader 34% 44% +10%
Understands the problems facing Australia 44% 43% -1%
Extreme 36% 38% +2%
Looks after the interests of working families 31% 35% +4%
Has a good team of leaders 29% 31% +2%
Keeps its promises 28% 23% -5%

The Liberal Party’s main attributes were – will promise anything to win votes (72%), divided (66%) and out of touch with ordinary people (58%).

Main changes since last July were – too dominated by its leader (up 10% to 44%), divided (down 8% to 66%) and professional in its approach (up 6% to 47%). Comments »

Party Attributes Comparison

Mar 15, 2010

  Labor Liberal

 

% difference
Looks after the interests of working families 57% 35% +22%
Has a good team of leaders 52% 31% +21%
Moderate 63% 50% +13%
Understands the problems facing Australia 54% 43% +11%
Keeps its promises 33% 23% +10%
Professional in its approach 55% 47% +8%
Too dominated by its leader 45% 44% +1%
Will promise to do anything to win votes 63% 72% -9%
Out of touch with ordinary people 48% 58% -10%
Extreme 26% 38% -12%
Divided 36% 66% -30%

The Labor Party maintains significant leads over the Liberal Party on all positive attributes – in particular, looks after the interest of working families (+22%), has a good team of leaders (+21%), moderate (+11%), understands the problems facing Australia (+11%) and keeps its promises (+10).

 The Liberal Party is more likely to be considered divided (-30%), extreme (-12%) and out of touch with ordinary people (-10%). Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Mar 1, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1816 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 37%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 40% 47% +1%
Labor 42% 53% -1%
Greens 9%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 7%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Feb 22, 2010

Q. If there was a Federal election held today, to which party would you probably give your first preference?  

Q. If you ‘don’t know’ on the above question, which party are you currently leaning to?  

*1834 sample size

2 week average % 2PP 2PP shift from last week
Liberal 37%    
National 3%    
Total Lib/Nat 40% 46% +1%
Labor 43% 54% -1%
Greens 8%    
Family First 2%    
Other/Independent 7%    

 NB.  The data in the above table is derived from our weekly first preference voting question.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ as their first preference are not included in the results. 

* Sample is the culmination of two week’s polling data.   Comments »

Reintroduction of WorkChoices under an Abbott Liberal Government

Feb 22, 2010

 Q. How likely do you think it is that Tony Abbott and the Liberals will reintroduce at least some parts of WorkChoices if they win the next election?

  Total Labor Coalition Green
Very likely 22% 41% 7% 26%
Quite likely 35% 36% 43% 39%
Not very likely 18% 8% 29% 15%
Not at all likely 5% 4% 7% 4%
Don’t know 20% 11% 14% 16%
Total likely 57% 77% 50% 65%
Total not likely 23% 12% 36% 19%

 Over half (57%) of Australians surveyed think that if Tony Abbott and the Liberals win the next election it is likely that they will introduce at least some parts of WorkChoices, 23% think it is unlikely and 20% don’t know.

 77% of Labor voters, 65% of Green voters and 50% of Coalition voters think that it is likely that at least some parts of WorkChoices will be introduced if Abbott and the Liberals win the next election. 

 People aged 45 – 55 were more likely to think that if the Liberal party wins the next election, at least some parts of WorkChoices will be introduced (68%), while people aged 65 years and over were more inclined to think it is unlikely some parts of WorkChoices will be introduced if the Liberals win the next election (32%).   Comments »

Future of WorkChoices

Feb 22, 2010

Q. Do you believe Tony Abbott when he says that WorkChoices is dead and would not be reintroduced by a future Liberal Government?

  %
Yes 22%
No 50%
Don’t know 28%

 Half (50%) of those surveyed do not believe Tony Abbott when he says that WorkChoices is dead and would not be reintroduced by a future Liberal Government, 22% believe Abbott and 28% don’t know.

 Results followed party lines – Labor (75%) and Green (80%) voters were more likely to not believe Abbott, while Coalition voters were more likely to believe Abbott when he says WorkChoices is dead and won’t be reintroduced (50%). 

 People aged 65 years and over were more likely to believe Abbott (39%) while those aged 18 – 24 were more likely to indicate they don’t know (36%).  Comments »

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