Contribution of multiculturalism

Mar 3, 2015

Q. Overall, has multiculturalism (that is, the acceptance of people from different countries, cultures and religions) made a positive or negative contribution to Australian society?

 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Feb 2011

Sep 2014

 

Total positive

57%

59%

59%

84%

37%

57%

57%

Total negative

29%

29%

31%

11%

45%

29%

30%

Very positive

18%

23%

9%

49%

11%

15%

18%

Positive

39%

36%

50%

35%

26%

42%

39%

Negative

18%

18%

20%

9%

21%

18%

19%

Very negative

11%

11%

11%

2%

24%

11%

11%

Made no difference

6%

4%

5%

12%

6%

6%

Don’t know

9%

7%

5%

5%

7%

8%

6%

 

57% believe that multiculturalism has made a positive contribution to Australian society and 29% believe the contribution has been negative. These results are almost identical to when this question was asked in September. A majority of major party voter groups believe the contribution has been positive.

84% of Greens voters and 74% of university-educated respondents thought it was positive.

View of multiculturalism

Mar 3, 2015

Q. Which of the following statements is closer to your view about multiculturalism? 

 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Feb 2011

Sep 2014

 

Multiculturalism and cultural diversity has enriched the social and economic lives of all Australians.

55%

58%

54%

80%

38%

53%

55%

Multiculturalism has failed and caused social division and religious extremism in Australia.

33%

31%

37%

12%

54%

38%

34%

Don’t know

12%

11%

9%

8%

9%

9%

11%

 

55% think that multiculturalism and cultural diversity has enriched the social and economic lives of all Australians while 33% agree more that multiculturalism has failed and caused social division and religious extremism in Australia. These results are almost identical to when this question was asked in September.

Those most likely to have a positive view of multiculturalism were aged under 35 (66%), Greens voters (80%) and those with university education (72%).

Contribution of multiculturalism

Sep 2, 2014

Q. Overall, has multiculturalism (that is, the acceptance of people from different countries, cultures and religions) made a positive or negative contribution to Australian society?

 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Feb 2011

Total positive

57%

64%

51%

81%

49%

57%

Total negative

30%

27%

37%

13%

42%

29%

Very positive

18%

27%

7%

50%

13%

15%

Positive

39%

37%

44%

31%

36%

42%

Negative

19%

21%

22%

7%

21%

18%

Very negative

11%

6%

15%

6%

21%

11%

Made no difference

6%

6%

6%

2%

6%

6%

Don’t know

6%

3%

7%

4%

3%

8%

57% believe that multiculturalism has made a positive contribution to Australian society and 30% believe the contribution has been negative. These results are almost identical to when this question was asked in 2011. A majority of major party voter groups believe the contribution has been positive.

Older respondents tend to have a more negative view – those aged 55+ were split 49% positive/42% negative while those aged under 35 were 69% positive and 19% negative. 72% of university educated respondents thought it was positive.

Can we stamp out racism?

Jun 5, 2012


Dr Helen Szoke explains that people need to learn how to identify and react to racism in social settings.

For the past decade, Australia has become the home of multiculturalism. Half of us were born overseas. In city suburbs Gen Y mixes easily with different nationalities and cultures. The fight against racism appears to have been won. Or has it?

The Racial Discrimination Commissioner, Dr Helen Szoke, tells 3Q racism is still a pervasive problem in Australia, with ethnic minorities and Indigenous people continuing to experience discrimination in subtle and not so subtle ways.

Read a transcript of a recent interview with Dr Szoke on the issue.

Unless they’re celebrating their ethnic diversity through a weekend festival or harmony day at their local school, most Australians want people to drop obvious cultural ties.

The Australian Human Rights Commission is developing a national anti-racism strategy to educate the public on what constitutes racism and how it can be prevented and reduced.

The polling that drives dog whistle politics … and may cure them

Mar 1, 2011

First published on The Drum: 01/03/2011

Here is the polling that is driving Scott Morrison’s subterranean attack on Muslims, confirmation that a majority of Australians are concerned about their numbers.

For too long conservative blowhards like Morrison have been running agendas that directly reference these findings but because they have remained hidden in a desk drawer they are merely debating an issue.

After much soul-searching, Essential has decided to commit an act of political interruption. We debated whether it was worth giving voice to these attitudes long and hard, but we believe getting this stuff out in the open is the only way to silence the dog whistle.

Q. Are you concerned about the number of Muslim people in Australia?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total concerned 57% 50% 69% 32%
Total not concerned 38% 46% 28% 68%
Very Concerned 28% 21% 37% 12%
Somewhat concerned 29% 29% 32% 20%
Not very concerned 21% 23% 19% 27%
Not at all concerned 17% 23% 9% 41%
Don’t know/Refused 5% 4% 2%

Comments »

Muslim Migrants

Feb 28, 2011

Q. In your view, should the Australian government exclude Muslims from our migrant intake?
(Question commissioned by Network Ten)

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-44 Aged 55+
Yes 25% 21% 33% 8% 26% 25% 19% 26% 31%
No 55% 62% 49% 83% 55% 54% 56% 57% 49%
Don’t know/Refused 20% 17% 18% 8% 19% 21% 25% 17% 20%

25% of respondents believed that the Australian government should exclude Muslims from our migrant intake and 55% disagreed. Those most likely to think Muslims should be excluded from our migration intake were Liberal/National voters (33%) and people aged 55+ (31%).

Download the Network Ten Essential Question of the Week (1.1 MB pdf)

Comments »

Contribution of Multiculturalism

Feb 28, 2011

Q. Overall, has multiculturalism (that is, the acceptance of people from different countries, cultures and religions) made a positive or negative contribution to Australian society?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total positive 57% 65% 54% 75%
Total negative 29% 24% 36% 12%
Very positive 15% 20% 10% 34%
Positive 42% 45% 44% 41%
Negative 18% 16% 21% 9%
Very negative 11% 8% 15% 9%
Made no difference 6% 6% 5% 3%
Don’t know 8% 4% 4% 4%

57% believe that multiculturalism has made a positive contribution to Australian society and 29% believe the contribution has been negative. A majority of all party voter groups believe the contribution has been positive.

Older respondents tend to have a more negative view – those aged 55+ were split 48% positive/45% negative while those aged under 35 were 65% positive and 18% negative.

Comments »

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