Most Important Factor in Government Regulation

Apr 30, 2012

Q. What should be the most important factor Governments consider in relation to regulating each of these issues – protecting rights and freedom, protecting people’s health and safety or managing the cost to taxpayers (e.g. health costs of drug/alcohol/tobacco use)?

 

Protecting rights and freedom 

Protecting people’s health and safety

Managing the cost to taxpayers

Don’t know

Wearing seatbelts in cars

5%

91%

3%

2%

Wearing bike helmets

6%

89%

3%

2%

Personal use of recreational drugs

18%

61%

12%

9%

Smoking in public places

19%

67%

9%

5%

Buying and consuming alcohol

25%

58%

11%

6%

Shopping hours

55%

11%

16%

19%

Cigarette packaging

16%

61%

14%

8%

Junk food advertising

16%

66%

11%

8%

Films (i.e. censorship)

59%

19%

7%

15%

The internet

62%

18%

6%

15%

 

For most of the areas listed above, the majority of respondents thought the most important factor for Governments to consider was ‘protecting people’s health and safety’.

 

The three areas where respondents thought that is was more important to consider ‘protecting rights and freedoms’ were ‘the internet’ (62%), ‘films’ (59%) and ‘shopping hours’ (55%).

 

‘Managing the cost to tax payers’ was not considered to be an important factor by most respondents.

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Awareness of Aged Care Reforms

Apr 30, 2012

Q. The Federal Government recently announced changes to aged care which included extra funding, better access to aged care services, capping costs of aged care accommodation and in-home care and means testing aged care accommodation costs. How much have you read or heard about those aged care changes?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

A lot

7%

11%

7%

4%

Some

26%

31%

26%

26%

A little

32%

28%

35%

32%

Nothing

30%

25%

28%

37%

Don’t know

5%

4%

5%

1%

Just 7% of respondents claim to have read or heard ‘a lot’ about the recent Federal Government changes to aged care. A further 26% have read or heard ‘some’.

32% of respondents have read or heard ‘a little’ while 30% have read or heard ‘nothing’.

Labor voters were more likely to have read or heard ‘a lot’ (11%) or ‘some’ (31%).

There were no significant differences based on gender.

Older respondents were more likely to state that they had read or heard ‘some’ about the aged care changes (33% of those aged 55-64 and 39% of those aged 65+).

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Opinion of Aged Care Reforms

Apr 30, 2012

Q. Do you approve or disapprove of the Government’s changes to aged care?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total approve

61%

71%

56%

68%

Total disapprove

7%

4%

10%

5%

Strongly approve

16%

24%

11%

20%

Approve

45%

47%

45%

48%

Disapprove

6%

3%

9%

3%

Strongly disapprove

1%

1%

1%

2%

Don’t know

33%

25%

34%

28%

 

61% of respondents approve of the Government’s changes to aged care. Just 7% disapprove.

Labor voters were more likely to approve (71%); however approval rates were still high for Lib/Nat voters (54%).

Females (65%) were more likely than males (56%) to approve of the changes.

Older respondents were also more likely to approve of the changes (78% of those aged 55-64 and 71% of those aged 65+).

Comments »

Party Trust Most on Aged Care

Apr 30, 2012

Q. Which party would you trust most to provide aged care services?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Labor Party

31%

77%

6%

46%

Liberal Party

27%

58%

7%

No difference

30%

17%

26%

43%

Don’t know

12%

6%

10%

4%

There was very little difference between the parties as to who respondents would trust more to provide aged care services – 31% selected Labor, 27% selected the Liberal Party and 30% said there was no difference.

Respondents tended to follow party lines in terms of which party they would trust most to deliver aged care services. However a large proportion of Labor (17%), Liberal (26%) and Green (43%) voters said there was no difference between the parties.

Males (32%) were more likely than females (22%) to most trust the Liberal party.

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Joe Hockey Statement

Apr 30, 2012

Q. The Shadow Treasurer Joe Hockey recently said people in Western countries have an attitude of “entitlement” and expect the Government to provide assistance and subsidies for things like education, health, income support, retirement benefits, unemployment benefits. Do you agree or disagree that people in Australia receive too much Government assistance?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total agree

39%

27%

54%

19%

Total disagree

33%

55%

20%

58%

Strongly agree

14%

10%

21%

3%

Agree

25%

17%

33%

16%

Neither agree nor disagree

23%

21%

23%

23%

Disagree

18%

22%

13%

31%

Strongly disagree

15%

23%

7%

27%

Don’t know

5%

7%

3%

Respondents were somewhat evenly split on their response to this question – 39% agree that people in Australia receive too much Government assistance while 33% disagree.

23% neither agree nor disagree and 5% don’t know.

Lib/Nat voters were significantly more likely to agree that people in Australia receive too much Government assistance (54%). Labor (55%) and Green (58%) voters were more likely to disagree.

Males (44%) were far more likely than females (32%) to agree that people in Australia receive too much Government assistance.

Those aged 65+ were also more likely to agree with this statement (48%), however those aged 55-64 were less likely (34%).

Comments »

Australian Spend on Aid

Apr 30, 2012

Q.  In 2000 John Howard signed the Millennium Declaration committing Australia to spend 0.7% of Gross National Income on aid (the equivalent of 70 cents in every $100 earned in the economy). How much do you think Australia spent on aid in 2011?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

0.35

13%

15%

12%

16%

0.5

12%

10%

16%

14%

0.7

7%

10%

7%

8%

More than 0.7

24%

28%

25%

20%

Don’t know

44%

37%

40%

42%

When asked home much of Australia’s Gross National Income is spent on aid, the largest proportion of respondents stated ‘don’t know’ (44%).

The next largest proportion (24%) said that it was more than the 0.7 committed in the Millennium Declaration.

13% said that Australia spent 0.35 on aid, and 12% said 0.5. Just 7% said 0.7.

There was little difference across voting intention.

Females (48%) were more likely than males (39%) to select ‘don’t know’.

Comments »

Australian Commitment to Aid

Apr 30, 2012

Q. The bipartisan commitment on aid says Australia will allocate 0.5% of Gross National Income (50 cents of every $100 earned in Australia) by 2015. Considering Australia gave 0.35% in 2011, do you think Australia should meet this commitment?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Should commit 0.5%

37%

46%

29%

62%

Should not commit 0.5%

35%

25%

46%

15%

Don’t know

29%

28%

25%

23%

The respondents were quite evenly split in their response to this question – 37% think Australia should commit 0.5% by 2015, 35% think that Australia should not commit to 0.5% by 2015 and 29% don’t know.

Lib/Nat voters were more likely to state that Australia should not commit to 0.5% (46%). Green voters were more likely to state that Australia should commit to 0.5% (62%).

Males (40%) were more likely than females (29%) to think that Australia should not commit to 0.5%. Females (33%) were more likely than males (24%) to select ‘don’t know’.

Those aged 18-24 were more likely to think that Australia should commit to 0.5% (48%).

Those in QLD were more likely to think Australia should not commit to 0.5% (43%).

Comments »

Federal politics – voting intention

Apr 23, 2012

Q. If a Federal Election was held today to which party will you probably give your first preference vote? If not sure, which party are you currently leaning toward?

Q. If don’t know -Well which party are you currently leaning to?

Sample size = 1,892 respondents

First preference/leaning to

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

26/3/12

2 weeks ago

10/4/12

Last week

16/4/12

This week

22/4/12

Liberal

45%

47%

45%

45%

National

3%

3%

3%

3%

Total Lib/Nat

43.6%

47%

50%

48%

49%

Labor

38.0%

34%

31%

31%

31%

Greens

11.8%

10%

11%

11%

11%

Other/Independent

6.6%

9%

9%

9%

9%

 

2PP

Election

21 Aug 10

4 weeks ago

2 weeks ago

Last week

This week

Total Lib/Nat

49.9%

54%

57%

56%

56%

Labor

50.1%

46%

43%

44%

44%

NB.  The data in the above tables comprise 2-week averages derived from the first preference/leaning to voting questions.  Respondents who select ‘don’t know’ are not included in the results.  The two-party preferred estimate is calculated by distributing the votes of the other parties according to their preferences at the 2010 election.

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