Experience of intolerance in Australia

Sep 24, 2012

Q. Do you personally experience one or more of the following forms of intolerance?

%[1]

Racism

12%

Ageism

12%

Sexism

11%

Religious intolerance

6%

Homophobia

4%

None of the above

67%

The vast majority of respondents do not experience intolerance (67%).

Of the forms of intolerance listed, 12% of respondents experience racism, 12% experience ageism and 11% experience sexism.

Smaller portions of respondents experience religious intolerance (6%) and homophobia (4%).


[1]Total will exceed 100% as respondents were able to select one or more of the forms of intolerance.

Intolerance as a problem in Australia

Sep 24, 2012

Q. For each of the following forms of intolerance, please indicate to what extent you think it is a problem in Australia:

 

Total large/moderate

Total

small/not

A large problem

Moderate problem

Small problem

Not a problem at all

Don’t know

Racism

71%

27%

32%

39%

21%

6%

2%

Religious intolerance

65%

32%

31%

34%

23%

9%

2%

Homophobia

50%

45%

18%

32%

33%

12%

5%

Sexism

45%

53%

12%

33%

40%

13%

2%

Ageism

44%

49%

15%

29%

33%

16%

8%

The vast majority of respondents (71%) regard racism to be either a large or moderate problem in Australia, followed by 65% who believe religious intolerance to be a problem.

Fifty percent (50%) of respondents regard homophobia to be a large or moderate problem in Australia.

After racism, religious intolerance and homophobia, 45% of respondents view sexism as either a large or moderate problem in Australia.  The majority of respondents see it as either a small problem or not a problem at all (53%).

Intolerance as a problem in Australia (continued)

Sep 24, 2012

Q. For each of the following forms of intolerance, please indicate to what extent you think it is a problem in Australia:

Total –

A large problem

Exp. Racism

(n=127)

Exp.
Sexism

(n=110)

Exp.
Religious Intolerance

(n=67)

Exp. Ageism

(n=123)

Do not exp.

(n=701)

Male

Female

Racism

32%

51%

42%

35%

34%

28%

29%

35%

Sexism

12%

18%

32%

21%

16%

9%

9%

15%

Homophobia

18%

20%

38%

21%

24%

15%

16%

20%

Religious intolerance

31%

32%

40%

48%

36%

28%

28%

34%

Ageism

15%

16%

20%

23%

34%

11%

15%

15%

The table above shows the results from the previous question (‘a large problem’ only) by sub-samples of those that experience one or more of the forms of intolerance and gender.  Only those sub-samples with a sample size of 50 respondents or greater are shown.

Respondents that experience racism were far more likely to regard racism as a large problem (51%).

Those that experience sexism were more likely to see all forms of intolerance as a large problem: racism (42%), sexism (32%), homophobia (38%), religious intolerance (40%) and ageism (20%).

Those that experience religious intolerance were more likely to regard sexism (21%), religious intolerance (48%) and ageism (23%) to be a large problem.

Those had do not experience any form of intolerance were consistently less likely to regard them to be a large problem.

Male respondents were also consistently less likely to regard each form of intolerance to be a large problem, compared with female respondents, save for ageism where an equal portion of male and female respondents (15%) see ageism as a large problem.

Party better at dealing with intolerance

Sep 24, 2012

Q.  In your view, which party is better at dealing with the various forms of intolerance?

 

Labor

Liberal

Greens

Other

Don’t know

Racism

17%

23%

11%

2%

46%

Sexism

19%

19%

12%

2%

47%

Homophobia

13%

17%

21%

3%

45%

Religious intolerance

16%

22%

9%

3%

50%

Ageism

16%

20%

8%

3%

52%

With the exception of sexism, when compared to Labor, the Liberals are consistently regarded by respondents as being the party that is better at dealing with racism (23% Liberal, 17% Labor), homophobia (13% Labor, 17% Liberal), religious intolerance (16% Labor, 22% Liberal) and ageism (16% Labor, 20% Liberal).

On sexism, both the major parties are equally regarded as the party that is better at dealing with it (19% each).

The Greens are regarded as the best party to deal with homophobia (21%).

There were a high portion of don’t knows in this question, with either a majority or close to a majority of respondents selecting this option for each form of intolerance.

Do we need foreign workers?

Jun 26, 2012


Rita Mallia speaks of the importance of unemployed locals getting the first pick of mining jobs as well as her union’s proud multicultural ethos.

Importing foreign workers has rocketed during the mining boom. Last year almost 90,000 workers were employed under 457 visa grants allowing them to stay and work in Australia for up to four years. The number of visas granted is up nearly 50 per cent on last year.

Since Gina RInehart received permission to bring in 1700 workers for her Roy Hill mine and the subsequent uproar, a Resources Jobs Board has been created.

The CFMEU’s Rita Mallia tells 3Q 60,000 people have already visited the website — putting paid to claims that Australians don’t want to do remote mining work.

Can we stamp out racism?

Jun 5, 2012


Dr Helen Szoke explains that people need to learn how to identify and react to racism in social settings.

For the past decade, Australia has become the home of multiculturalism. Half of us were born overseas. In city suburbs Gen Y mixes easily with different nationalities and cultures. The fight against racism appears to have been won. Or has it?

The Racial Discrimination Commissioner, Dr Helen Szoke, tells 3Q racism is still a pervasive problem in Australia, with ethnic minorities and Indigenous people continuing to experience discrimination in subtle and not so subtle ways.

Read a transcript of a recent interview with Dr Szoke on the issue.

Unless they’re celebrating their ethnic diversity through a weekend festival or harmony day at their local school, most Australians want people to drop obvious cultural ties.

The Australian Human Rights Commission is developing a national anti-racism strategy to educate the public on what constitutes racism and how it can be prevented and reduced.

Politicians Raising Race/Religion Issues

Feb 28, 2011

Q. Do you think some politicians raise issues of race and religion for political purposes just to generate votes or do you think these politicians are genuinely concerned about Australia’s future?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Some politicians raise issues of race and religion for political purposes just to generate votes 61% 66% 55% 80%
These politicians are genuinely concerned about Australia’s future 27% 21% 37% 14%
Don’t know 12% 12% 7% 5%

61% believed that some politicians raise issues of race and religion for political purposes just to generate votes and 27% thought these politicians are genuinely concerned about Australia’s future.

Those most likely to think these politicians are genuinely concerned about Australia’s future were Liberal/National voters (37%) – and among people aged 55+, 34% thought these politicians are genuinely concerned about Australia’s future and 58% thought they use race and religion for political purposes.

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