Forms of intolerance

Aug 11, 2015

Q. For each of the following forms of intolerance, please indicate to what extent you think it is a problem in Australia. 

  Total large/ moderate   Large prob. Mod. prob. Small prob. Not a prob.   Don’t know   Sep 12  Total large/ mod. Jun 13  Total large/ mod. Feb 14  Total large/ mod. Jun 15  Total large/ mod.
Racism against people from other countries 60% 22% 38% 28% 9% 4% 71% 69% 64% 58%
Racism against indigenous Australians 54% 19% 35% 29% 12% 4% 51%
Sexism 47% 14% 33% 38% 10% 6% 45% 52% 51% 44%
Homophobia 47% 13% 34% 32% 13% 7% 50% 51% 47% 42%
Religious intolerance 53% 18% 35% 30% 11% 5% 65% 54% 51% 56%
Ageism 48% 17% 31% 33% 12% 8% 44% 46% 49% 49%

47% think homophobia is a major/moderate problem in Australia – up 5% since June.

60% think that racism against people from other countries is a major/moderate problem in Australia – and 54% think racism against indigenous Australians is a major/moderate problem. These figures have not changed substantially since June.

Immigration and Religion

Sep 2, 2014

Q. When a family applies to migrate to Australia, should it be possible for them to be rejected purely on the basis of their religion?

 

 

Total

 

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Feb 2011

Should be rejected on basis of religion

21%

16%

27%

9%

29%

19%

Should not be rejected on basis of religion

63%

71%

53%

84%

56%

65%

Don’t know

17%

13%

20%

7%

15%

15%

63% believed that when a family applies to migrate to Australia, they should not be rejected purely on the basis of their religion and 21% think it should be possible to reject purely based on religion. These figures are similar to when this question was asked in 2011.

There were no substantial differences across age and gender groups.

Liberal voters were a little more supportive of being able to reject based on religion (27%) and Greens voters were strongly opposed (84%).

Membership of Organisations

Dec 5, 2011

Q. Which of the following types of organisations have you ever been a member of?

Q. Which of the following types of organisations are you currently a member of?

Q. And which of the following types of organisations have you joined in the last 12 months?

Ever been a member Currently a member Joined in last 12 months
Trade union 34% 9% 2%
Professional organization 28% 13% 3%
Environment group 9% 4% 2%
Religion/church 31% 13% 2%
Book club 14% 4% 1%
Service organisation like Rotary, Lions, Apex, etc 9% 4% 1%
School organisation e.g. parents club, school council 22% 4% 2%
Sports club 38% 17% 6%
Political party 6% 1% *
Local community group 21% 11% 3%
Special interest or hobby group e.g. gardening, birdwatching, chess, etc 20% 10% 3%
Other organisation 9% 6% 1%
Total members 81% 56% 20%

56% say they are currently members of an organisation and 20% say they have joined an organisation in the last 12 months. The most popular types of organisations are sports clubs (17% members) religions/churches (13%) and professional organisations (13%). Membership of organisations is slightly lower for those aged under 35 (53%) and a little higher for those aged 55+ (58%). 59% of men and 53% of women say they are members of an organisation.

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Trust in various Australian institutions

Sep 26, 2011

Q. How much trust do you have in the following institutions?

Total Trust Total No Trust A lot of trust Some trust A little trust No trust Don’t know
The High Court 72% 19% 33% 39% 13% 6% 10%
The Reserve Bank 67% 24% 23% 44% 17% 7% 10%
Courts in general 65% 26% 19% 46% 18% 8% 9%
Charitable organisations 61% 30% 18% 43% 22% 8% 9%
Federal Parliament 55% 36% 15% 40% 21% 15% 10%
The ABC 46% 44% 12% 34% 31% 13% 10%
Environment groups 45% 46% 11% 34% 28% 18% 9%
Trade unions 39% 52% 10% 29% 30% 22% 10%
Business groups 38% 51% 6% 32% 34% 17% 10%
Religious organisations 29% 62% 9% 20% 27% 35% 9%
Please note: ‘Total Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘A lot of trust’ and ‘Some trust’ together.  ‘Total No Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by combining ‘A little trust’ and ‘No trust’.

The institution in which respondents place the most trust is the High Court with 72% of respondents stating that they either have ‘a lot of trust’ or ‘some trust’ in the High Court.  The High Court is followed by the Reserve Bank (67%), Courts in general (65%) and Charitable organisations (61%).

Federal parliament features below these top four, ranking 5th with 55% of respondents having either ‘a lot of trust’ or ‘some trust’, followed by the ABC which ranked in sixth place (46% total trust).

The institutions for which respondents had the most distrust were trade unions (52% no trust), business groups (51% no trust) and Religious organisations, which attracted the highest proportion of distrust (62% no trust).

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Involvement in Religious Activities

Jul 27, 2011

Q. Thinking about your involvement (if any) in religious activities – over the last five years have you –
(This question was commissioned by Network Ten)

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Men Women Age

18-34

Aged

35-54

Aged 55+
Participated more in religious activities 10% 10% 11% 3% 7% 12% 10% 10% 8%
Participated less in religious activities 7% 8% 7% 4% 7% 7% 14% 4% 3%
Participated about the same 25% 22% 27% 24% 24% 26% 22% 29% 24%
Not participated at all in religious activities 55% 59% 52% 67% 58% 52% 49% 54% 64%
Don’t know 3% 1% 2% 2% 3% 3% 5% 3% 1%

10% say they have participated more in religious activities over the last 5 years and 7% have participated less. 25% say their participation has not changed and 55 have not participated in religious activities at all.

Women (12%) were more likely to have participated more and those aged under 35 more likely to have participated less (14%).

Older respondents were most likely not to have participated at all (64%).

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The polling that drives dog whistle politics … and may cure them

Mar 1, 2011

First published on The Drum: 01/03/2011

Here is the polling that is driving Scott Morrison’s subterranean attack on Muslims, confirmation that a majority of Australians are concerned about their numbers.

For too long conservative blowhards like Morrison have been running agendas that directly reference these findings but because they have remained hidden in a desk drawer they are merely debating an issue.

After much soul-searching, Essential has decided to commit an act of political interruption. We debated whether it was worth giving voice to these attitudes long and hard, but we believe getting this stuff out in the open is the only way to silence the dog whistle.

Q. Are you concerned about the number of Muslim people in Australia?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Total concerned 57% 50% 69% 32%
Total not concerned 38% 46% 28% 68%
Very Concerned 28% 21% 37% 12%
Somewhat concerned 29% 29% 32% 20%
Not very concerned 21% 23% 19% 27%
Not at all concerned 17% 23% 9% 41%
Don’t know/Refused 5% 4% 2%

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Muslim Migrants

Feb 28, 2011

Q. In your view, should the Australian government exclude Muslims from our migrant intake?
(Question commissioned by Network Ten)

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens Men Women Aged 18-34 Aged 35-44 Aged 55+
Yes 25% 21% 33% 8% 26% 25% 19% 26% 31%
No 55% 62% 49% 83% 55% 54% 56% 57% 49%
Don’t know/Refused 20% 17% 18% 8% 19% 21% 25% 17% 20%

25% of respondents believed that the Australian government should exclude Muslims from our migrant intake and 55% disagreed. Those most likely to think Muslims should be excluded from our migration intake were Liberal/National voters (33%) and people aged 55+ (31%).

Download the Network Ten Essential Question of the Week (1.1 MB pdf)

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Immigration and Religion

Feb 28, 2011

Q. When a family applies to migrate to Australia, should it be possible for them to be rejected purely on the basis of their religion?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Should be rejected on basis of religion 19% 17% 24% 10%
Should not be rejected on basis of religion 65% 67% 63% 85%
Don’t know 15% 16% 13% 5%

65% believed that when a family applies to migrate to Australia, they should not be rejected purely on the basis of their religion and 19% think it should be possible to reject purely based on religion. There were no substantial differences across age and gender groups.

Liberal voters were a little more supportive of being able to reject based on religion (24%) and Greens voters were strongly opposed (85%).

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