Trust in Institutions

Jul 1, 2014

Q. How much trust do you have in the following institutions and organisations?

 

Total

trust

 

A lot of trust

Some trust

A little trust

No trust

Don’t know

% change

 

Total trust

12 Jun 12

Total trust

18 Mar 13

The High Court

57%

20%

37%

27%

12%

4%

-17

60%

74%

The ABC

54%

18%

36%

29%

13%

5%

-16

54%

70%

The Reserve Bank

52%

17%

35%

30%

13%

5%

-12

49%

64%

Charitable organisations

45%

6%

39%

36%

14%

4%

-7

50%

52%

Your local council

33%

5%

28%

38%

24%

4%

-1

na

34%

TV news media

32%

2%

26%

47%

23%

3%

+2

21%

30%

Environment groups

31%

5%

26%

38%

25%

5%

-10

32%

41%

The Commonwealth Public Service

31%

5%

26%

40%

19%

10%

-5

30%

36%

Newspapers

30%

3%

27%

46%

21%

3%

26%

30%

Religious organisations

26%

5%

21%

28%

41%

4%

-1

27%

27%

Federal Parliament

25%

4%

21%

33%

39%

3%

-9

22%

34%

Online news media

25%

2%

23%

49%

21%

4%

-2

23%

27%

State Parliament

24%

3%

21%

35%

37%

4%

-6

na

30%

Trade unions

22%

4%

18%

33%

39%

7%

-3

22%

25%

Business groups

22%

1%

21%

44%

27%

6%

-4

22%

26%

Political parties

13%

2%

11%

33%

50%

3%

+1

12%

12%

 Note: ‘Total Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘A lot of trust’ and ‘Some trust’

Since this question was last asked in March last year, there has been a significant decline in trust in the High Court (-17%), the ABC (-16%), the Reserve Bank (-12%), environment groups (-10) and the Federal Parliament (-9). Trust in the High Court, ABC and Reserve Bank is back to similar levels to that recorded in 2012.

Respondents had most trust in the High Court (57%), the ABC (54%), the Reserve Bank (52%) and charitable organisations (45%). They had least trust in political parties (13%), trade unions (22%) and business groups (22%).

Compared to the average, Labor voters had more trust in the ABC (62%), environment groups (41%) and trade unions (34%).

Liberal/National voters, compared to the average, had a little more trust in the Reserve Bank (62%), Federal Parliament (43%), State Parliament (36%) and business groups (32%).

Trust in institutions

Mar 18, 2013

Q. How much trust do you have in the following institutions and organisations?

 

Total
trust
26
Sep
11

Total
trust
12
Jun
12

Total trust
22
Oct
12

Total trust
18
Mar
13

A lot of trust

Some trust

A little trust

No trust

Don’t know

% change

The High Court

72%

60%

63%

74%

34%

40%

13%

6%

8%

+11

The ABC

46%

54%

59%

70%

22%

48%

17%

6%

7%

+11

The Reserve Bank

67%

49%

53%

64%

21%

43%

21%

8%

7%

+11

Charitable organisations

61%

50%

53%

52%

9%

43%

33%

9%

6%

-1

Environment groups

45%

32%

36%

41%

6%

35%

33%

20%

7%

+5

The Commonwealth Public Service

  49%*

30%

33%

36%

4%

32%

37%

17%

9%

+3

Federal Parliament

55%

22%

26%

34%

4%

30%

31%

29%

6%

+8

Your local council

na

na

32%

34%

3%

31%

39%

22%

6%

+2

TV news media

na

21%

26%

30%

4%

26%

46%

20%

4%

+4

State Parliament

na

na

25%

30%

4%

26%

32%

31%

6%

+5

Newspapers

na

26%

31%

30%

3%

27%

43%

22%

5%

-1

Religious organisations

29%

27%

31%

27%

5%

22%

29%

37%

7%

-4

Online news media

na

23%

28%

27%

3%

24%

48%

20%

6%

-1

Business groups

38%

22%

25%

26%

3%

23%

42%

23%

9%

+1

Trade unions

39%

22%

23%

25%

4%

21%

31%

36%

7%

+2

Political parties

na

12%

16%

12%

1%

11%

36%

45%

6%

-4

 Note: ‘Total Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘A lot of trust’ and ‘Some trust’.
* This Commonwealth Public Service figure is from a question asked in 6 Feb 12.

Since this question was last asked in October, there has been a significant increase in trust in the High Court (+11%), the ABC (+11%), the Reserve Bank (+11%) and the Federal Parliament (+8). Trust in the High Court and Reserve Bank is back to similar levels to that recorded in 2011.

Respondents had most trust in the High Court (74%), the ABC (70%), the Reserve Bank (64%) and charitable organisations (52%). They had least trust in political parties (12%), trade unions (25%), business groups (26%), online news media (27%) and religious organisations (27%).

Compared to the average, Labor voters had more trust in the ABC (77%), environment groups (50%), the Commonwealth Public Service (44%), local councils (42%), Federal Parliament (43%) and trade unions (41%).

Liberal/National voters, compared to the average, had a little more trust in religious organisations (31%) and TV news media (35%).

Trust in organisations and institutions

Oct 22, 2012

Q. How much trust do you have in the following institutions and organisations?

 

Total

trust

26 Sep 11

Total

trust

12 Jun 12

Total trust

22 Oct 12

A lot of trust

Some trust

A little trust

No trust

Don’t know

% change

The High Court

72%

60%

63%

26%

37%

21%

10%

6%

+3

The ABC

46%

54%

59%

20%

39%

26%

8%

6%

+5

The Reserve Bank

67%

49%

53%

16%

37%

28%

12%

8%

+4

Charitable organisations

61%

50%

53%

9%

44%

33%

10%

5%

+3

Environment groups

45%

32%

36%

8%

28%

35%

24%

6%

+4

The Commonwealth Public Service

  49%*

30%

33%

6%

27%

41%

16%

10%

+3

Your local council

na

na

32%

4%

28%

39%

22%

6%

na

Religious organisations

29%

27%

31%

7%

24%

28%

35%

6%

+4

Newspapers

na

26%

31%

4%

27%

45%

20%

4%

+5

Online news media

na

23%

28%

4%

24%

45%

20%

6%

+5

TV news media

na

21%

26%

5%

21%

44%

26%

4%

+5

Federal Parliament

55%

22%

26%

4%

22%

37%

32%

5%

+4

State Parliament

na

na

25%

4%

21%

37%

33%

5%

na

Business groups

38%

22%

25%

3%

22%

45%

21%

9%

+3

Trade unions

39%

22%

23%

5%

18%

32%

36%

9%

+1

Political parties

na

12%

16%

2%

14%

36%

42%

6%

+4

Note: ‘Total Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘A lot of trust’ and ‘Some trust’.
* This Commonwealth Public Service figure is from a question asked in 6 Feb 12.

Overall, there have been small increases in trust across all organisations since this question was last asked in June. However, there has been no significant change in the rankings.

Respondents had most trust in the High Court (63%), the ABC (59%), charitable organisations (53%) and the Reserve Bank (53%). They had least trust in political parties (16%), trade unions (23%), business groups (25%) State Parliaments (25%), Federal Parliament (26%) and TV news media (26%).

Compared to the average, Labor voters had more trust in Federal Parliament (40%), the High Court (67%), the ABC (68%), the Reserve Bank (61%), the Commonwealth Public Service (42%), trade unions (41%), environment groups (48%) and local councils (39%).

Liberal/National voters, compared to the average, had more trust in religious organisations (37%) and business groups (32%) but less trust in Federal Parliament (21%), Commonwealth Public Service (28%), trade unions (14%) and environment groups (27%).

The People Don’t Dig Austerity

Aug 14, 2012

No one really knows which way the global economy is headed. Predictions are not a science: one day markets rise because certain people *think* some indicators look good—only to reverse themselves the very next day. But one thing is clear: real people don’t like austerity which will influence the direction of political alignments. Take the Dutch.

The Wall Street Journal wrings its hands today over this (subscription required):

A far-left party is emerging as a front-runner in next month’s elections in the Netherlands, as it benefits from growing voter resentment toward the German-led austerity drive and euro-zone bailouts.

A win by the anti-austerity Socialist Party could threaten to unravel a cost-cutting plan agreed under the current government in April, and also could derail stringent budget targets for 2013 set by the European Commission and fiercely advocated by Prime Minister Mark Rutte.

…But recent polls suggest Dutch voters, frustrated with austerity at home and increasingly wary of bailing out Southern European governments, may reject the package. The Socialist Party, which didn’t support the austerity plan, would win the most seats in the 150-member Parliament—about 37, or seven more than Mr. Rutte’s Liberal Party, recent polls by research firms TNS NIPO and Peil.nl show.

Consider the source—The Wall Street Journal—when you consider the epithet “far left” but pay close attention to this:

The Socialist Party doesn’t shy from controversy: It wants to curtail the European Central Bank’s independence by establishing “democratic supervision” over the bank and to broaden the ECB’s mandate, currently limited to ensuring price stability, to allow it to stimulate the economy to create jobs.

The idea that central banks—whether the Reserve Bank in Australia, the ECB or the US Federal Reserve Bank—should be more democratic and transparent, and, most important, be focused on creating jobs, not just price stability, is hardly radical. If you just pitched that to the average person, without putting the tag of “far left” on the idea, it would be a very broadly supported policy.


@jonathantasini

Has the Reserve Bank got it right?

May 8, 2012


Michael O’Connor questions why the national bank took so long to cut rates.

Our economy has had 20 years of growth thanks to our resources boom. But the casualty has been other sectors of the economy, including manufacturing. The CFMEU’s national secretary Michael O’Connor tells 3Q the Reserve Bank waited too long to cut rates and should be cutting more. And he’s not alone in his criticism.

According to him, the Reserve Bank has forgotten its obligation under its Act to maintain full employment in our two-speed economy. And he says mining companies should be more accountable in their engagement with local industry by ensuring access to the huge market for mining services and infrastructure.

Trust in various Australian institutions

Sep 26, 2011

Q. How much trust do you have in the following institutions?

Total Trust Total No Trust A lot of trust Some trust A little trust No trust Don’t know
The High Court 72% 19% 33% 39% 13% 6% 10%
The Reserve Bank 67% 24% 23% 44% 17% 7% 10%
Courts in general 65% 26% 19% 46% 18% 8% 9%
Charitable organisations 61% 30% 18% 43% 22% 8% 9%
Federal Parliament 55% 36% 15% 40% 21% 15% 10%
The ABC 46% 44% 12% 34% 31% 13% 10%
Environment groups 45% 46% 11% 34% 28% 18% 9%
Trade unions 39% 52% 10% 29% 30% 22% 10%
Business groups 38% 51% 6% 32% 34% 17% 10%
Religious organisations 29% 62% 9% 20% 27% 35% 9%
Please note: ‘Total Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by adding ‘A lot of trust’ and ‘Some trust’ together.  ‘Total No Trust’ is an aggregate figure achieved by combining ‘A little trust’ and ‘No trust’.

The institution in which respondents place the most trust is the High Court with 72% of respondents stating that they either have ‘a lot of trust’ or ‘some trust’ in the High Court.  The High Court is followed by the Reserve Bank (67%), Courts in general (65%) and Charitable organisations (61%).

Federal parliament features below these top four, ranking 5th with 55% of respondents having either ‘a lot of trust’ or ‘some trust’, followed by the ABC which ranked in sixth place (46% total trust).

The institutions for which respondents had the most distrust were trade unions (52% no trust), business groups (51% no trust) and Religious organisations, which attracted the highest proportion of distrust (62% no trust).

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Impact of Competition on Interest rates

Nov 15, 2010

Q. If there was more competition between Australian banks, do you think this would stop the banks increasing interest rates by more than the Reserve Bank rate increases?

Total Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Yes 47% 48% 50% 55%
No 31% 31% 34% 18%
Don’t know 22% 22% 16% 27%

47% think that if there was more competition between Australian banks, this would stop the banks increasing interest rates by more than the Reserve Bank rate increases while 31% disagree.

Older people and those on lower incomes were split in their opinions – for those aged 55+, 41% agreed and 38% disagreed while 41% of those on incomes under $600pw disagreed and 38% agreed.

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Regulation of Banks – Specific Rules

Nov 1, 2010

Q. Would you support or oppose the following regulations for Australia’s banks?

  Total support Total oppose Strongly support Support Oppose Strongly oppose Don’t know
Stopping banks from sending jobs off-shore 83% 7% 46% 37% 5% 2% 9%
Only permitting banks to change interest rates in line with Reserve Bank rates 82% 11% 53% 29% 8% 3% 7%
Capping bank CEO’s salaries 84% 9% 60% 24% 7% 2% 6%
Ensuring bank fees are not higher than the actual cost of the service 91% 4% 67% 24% 3% 1% 4%
A requirement to let customers know if their personal data is being sent to other countries for processing 93% 2% 71% 22% 2% * 6%
Tougher rules about giving loans and credit 74% 15% 32% 42% 13% 2% 12%

More than 90% support regulations requiring banks to let customers know if their personal data is being sent to other countries for processing and ensuring bank fees are not higher than the actual cost of the service. Over 80% support stopping banks from sending jobs off-shore, only permitting banks to change interest rates in line with Reserve Bank rates and capping bank CEO’s salaries.

There were no substantial differences by voting intention – all regulations were strongly supported by all voter groups.

  Total support Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Stopping banks from sending jobs off-shore 83% 85% 85% 83%
Only permitting banks to change interest rates in line with Reserve Bank rates 82% 87% 82% 73%
Capping bank CEO’s salaries 84% 88% 83% 86%
Ensuring bank fees are not higher than the actual cost of the service 91% 93% 93% 90%
A requirement to let customers know if their personal data is being sent to other countries for processing 93% 94% 93% 94%
Tougher rules about giving loans and credit 74% 71% 80% 77%

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