Impact of superannuation changes on salary increases

Sep 16, 2014

Q. Do you expect that, as a result of superannuation increases being deferred, workers will now receive larger salary increases? 

 

Total

 

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Vote other

 

Work full time

Work part time

Yes

10%

9%

14%

8%

5%

13%

7%

No

65%

68%

60%

83%

77%

70%

66%

Don’t know

25%

23%

26%

9%

18%

17%

27%

Only 10% believe that as a result of superannuation increases being deferred, workers will now receive larger salary increases.

13% of full-time workers and 7% of part-time workers believe workers will now receive larger salary increases.

Party Best at Handling Issues

Nov 8, 2010

Q. Between Liberal and Labor, which party do you think would be best at managing each of the following issues?

  Labor Liberal No difference Don’t know Labor-Liberal difference
Improving wages for low income earners 34% 20% 34% 13% +14
The age pension 27% 23% 37% 13% +4
Executive salaries 22% 20% 44% 14% +2
Unemployment 24% 25% 38% 13% -1
Regulation of large corporations 21% 24% 41% 14% -3
Affordability of housing 19% 24% 44% 13% -5
Jobs going overseas 18% 24% 44% 14% -6
Superannuation 18% 27% 40% 15% -9
Petrol and energy prices 16% 26% 45% 13% -10
Regulation of banks 19% 29% 39% 14% -10
Interest rates 17% 30% 41% 13% -13
Food prices and inflation generally 18% 31% 38% 13% -13
Taxation 18% 32% 37% 13% -14
Government debt 15% 42% 31% 12% -27

The only substantial lead for the Labor Party is on improving wages for low income earners (34% to 20%).

 Liberal Party strengths are in managing Government debt (42%/15%), taxation (32%/18%), food prices and inflation (31%/18%) and interest rates (30%/17%).

Although overall opinions are closely related to voting intention, the Liberal Party generally performs better among its voters than the Labor Party does with its voters. On Government debt Labor voters split 35% Labor/14% Liberal/42% no difference and on petrol and energy prices 37%/2%/50%. Comments »

Regulation of Banks – Specific Rules

Nov 1, 2010

Q. Would you support or oppose the following regulations for Australia’s banks?

  Total support Total oppose Strongly support Support Oppose Strongly oppose Don’t know
Stopping banks from sending jobs off-shore 83% 7% 46% 37% 5% 2% 9%
Only permitting banks to change interest rates in line with Reserve Bank rates 82% 11% 53% 29% 8% 3% 7%
Capping bank CEO’s salaries 84% 9% 60% 24% 7% 2% 6%
Ensuring bank fees are not higher than the actual cost of the service 91% 4% 67% 24% 3% 1% 4%
A requirement to let customers know if their personal data is being sent to other countries for processing 93% 2% 71% 22% 2% * 6%
Tougher rules about giving loans and credit 74% 15% 32% 42% 13% 2% 12%

More than 90% support regulations requiring banks to let customers know if their personal data is being sent to other countries for processing and ensuring bank fees are not higher than the actual cost of the service. Over 80% support stopping banks from sending jobs off-shore, only permitting banks to change interest rates in line with Reserve Bank rates and capping bank CEO’s salaries.

There were no substantial differences by voting intention – all regulations were strongly supported by all voter groups.

  Total support Vote Labor Vote Lib/Nat Vote Greens
Stopping banks from sending jobs off-shore 83% 85% 85% 83%
Only permitting banks to change interest rates in line with Reserve Bank rates 82% 87% 82% 73%
Capping bank CEO’s salaries 84% 88% 83% 86%
Ensuring bank fees are not higher than the actual cost of the service 91% 93% 93% 90%
A requirement to let customers know if their personal data is being sent to other countries for processing 93% 94% 93% 94%
Tougher rules about giving loans and credit 74% 71% 80% 77%

Comments »

Salary levels for various occupations

Apr 19, 2010

Q. Do you think the salaries of the following occupations are too low, too high or bout right?

  Too high Too low About right Don’t know
CEO’s of large companies 84% 2% 7% 7%
Members of Parliament 62% 6% 24% 8%
Tradesmen 29% 16% 44% 11%
Doctors 27% 15% 46% 12%
Public servants – clerical and admin 26% 15% 44% 15%
Bank customer service staff 12% 18% 47% 23%
Office workers in private companies – clerical and admin 7% 24% 54% 16%
Workers in call centres 8% 25% 42% 25%
Shop sales staff 3% 40% 42% 14%
Teachers 8% 45% 38% 8%
Police 5% 55% 27% 12%
Aged care workers 2% 76% 12% 10%

 The majority believe that the salaries of CEO’s of large companies (84%) and members of Parliament (62%) are too high.

 Occupations where salaries were considered too low were aged care workers (76%), police (55%) and teachers (45%). Comments »

Gap in salaries

Apr 19, 2010

Q. Over the last few years, do you think that the gap between the incomes of richest and poorest people in Australia has increased, decreased or stayed much the same?

  %
Increased 77%
Decreased 4%
Stayed much the same 13%
Don’t know 6%

 77% believe that the gap between the incomes of richest and poorest people in Australia has increased over the last few years.

 Older respondents were more likely to think the gap had increased – 88% of those aged 55+ compared to 58% of those aged 18-35.

There were no significant differences by voting intention. Comments »

Regulating CEO’s salaries

Apr 19, 2010

Q. Should the Federal Government regulate the salaries of CEO’s of large companies?

  %
Yes 74%
No 17%
Don’t know 9%

 There was strong majority support (74%) for the Federal Government to regulate the salaries of CEO’s of large companies.

 82% of Labor voters support regulation compared to 74% of Greens voters and 69% of Liberal/National voters. Support was also stronger among those on lower incomes (86% of incomes under $600pw). Comments »

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