Use of online media

Jan 20, 2015

Q. How often do you use the following online media – 

 

Total at least once a week

 

At least daily

Several times a week

About once a week

Less often

Never

Can’t say

Google

83%

45%

28%

10%

6%

9%

2%

Facebook

68%

42%

16%

10%

9%

21%

2%

Newspaper websites

49%

18%

17%

14%

21%

27%

3%

Other news websites

44%

13%

17%

14%

20%

32%

4%

Blogs

20%

3%

7%

10%

19%

59%

3%

Websites about social and political campaigns

13%

1%

5%

7%

21%

61%

4%

Twitter

16%

5%

5%

6%

11%

70%

3%

Instagram

19%

8%

5%

6%

9%

70%

3%

Flickr

7%

1%

2%

4%

9%

82%

3%

FourSquare

6%

1%

2%

3%

4%

87%

4%

LinkedIn

15%

2%

5%

8%

17%

65%

3%

MySpace

5%

1%

2%

2%

5%

87%

3%

YouTube

54%

9%

24%

21%

25%

18%

2%

Google+

21%

5%

8%

8%

17%

58%

4%

Pinterest

13%

2%

4%

7%

15%

69%

3%

Tumblr

7%

1%

3%

3%

8%

82%

3%

The most used online media were Google (83% at least once a week), Facebook (68%), Youtube (54%), Newspaper websites (49%) and other news websites (44%).

Men were heavier users of Twitter (22%), LinkedIn (20%) and Youtube (60%).

Women were heavier users of Facebook (72%) and Pinterest (18%).

 

Total at least once a week

 

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

Google

83%

81%

85%

86%

83%

79%

Facebook

68%

65%

72%

81%

67%

57%

Newspaper websites

49%

51%

47%

50%

52%

41%

Other news websites

44%

43%

45%

46%

45%

42%

Blogs

20%

20%

20%

29%

17%

9%

Websites about social and political campaigns

13%

16%

11%

21%

12%

10%

Twitter

16%

22%

12%

27%

15%

4%

Instagram

19%

17%

20%

42%

10%

3%

Flickr

7%

8%

5%

15%

3%

FourSquare

6%

6%

4%

11%

3%

*

LinkedIn

15%

20%

12%

18%

19%

7%

MySpace

5%

5%

4%

10%

3%

*

YouTube

54%

60%

50%

74%

52%

37%

Google+

21%

21%

20%

20%

21%

21%

Pinterest

13%

8%

18%

22%

10%

7%

Tumblr

7%

7%

6%

15%

5%

*

 

Opinions of social media

Jan 20, 2015

Q. For each of the statements about social media (like facebook, twitter) below, please indicate whether you agree or disagree 

 

Total agree

Total disagree

 

Strongly agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly disagree

Don’t know

Online social media are a good way to have your say on political issues

46%

37%

5%

41%

23%

14%

17%

Online social media can get people interested in political affairs

50%

29%

5%

45%

19%

10%

21%

Most people spend too much time on social media at the expense of other activities

80%

9%

36%

44%

7%

2%

10%

Online social media is a modern way to keep abreast of political affairs

48%

36%

5%

43%

23%

13%

16%

I frequently share things of interest on social media

35%

59%

6%

29%

29%

30%

6%

A large majority (80%) agreed that “Most people spend too much time on social media at the expense of other activities”.

However, respondents were also more likely to agree that online social media can get people interested in political affairs (50%), is a modern way to keep abreast of political affairs (48%) and are a good way to have your say on political issues 46%).

35% agree that they frequently share things of interest on social media.

Concern about surveillance of social media

Sep 30, 2014

Q. How concerned are you about privacy and surveillance of social media? 

 

Total

 

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

Total concerned

71%

69%

73%

76%

71%

65%

Total not concerned

25%

27%

24%

20%

26%

35%

Very concerned

28%

27%

29%

31%

27%

26%

Somewhat concerned

43%

42%

44%

45%

43%

39%

Not very concerned

19%

19%

19%

16%

18%

28%

Not at all concerned

6%

8%

5%

4%

8%

7%

Don’t know

3%

3%

3%

4%

3%

(based on the  74% of respondents who use social media)

71% of social media users were concerned about privacy and surveillance of social media.
Those most likely to be concerned were aged under 35 (76%) and university educated (77%).

Actions taken on social media

Sep 30, 2014

Q. Have you taken any of the following actions in that last 12 months because of concerns about privacy and surveillance of social media?

 

Total

 

Men

Women

Aged 18-34

Aged 35-54

Aged 55+

Increased my security settings

55%

50%

58%

60%

55%

46%

Changed the types of things I say or put up on social media

49%

47%

51%

59%

44%

42%

Removed information about myself

41%

38%

43%

51%

38%

28%

Cut back my list of friends or people I follow

39%

36%

41%

48%

36%

27%

Taken other actions

20%

20%

20%

25%

18%

16%

(based on the 74% of respondents who use social media)

A majority had taken some form of action in the last 12 months because of concerns about privacy and surveillance of social media. The most common actions taken were increasing security settings (55%) and changing the types of things said or put up on social media (49%).

Trust in information

Feb 25, 2013

Q. How much trust do you have in the following for information on major public issues like immigration, climate change or the economy?

 

A lot of trust

Some trust

Not much trust

No trust at all

Don’t know

Don’t use

What I see on TV news and current affairs

5%

50%

30%

11%

3%

1%

What I hear on radio news and current affairs

5%

51%

30%

8%

3%

4%

What I hear on radio talkback

5%

35%

31%

17%

3%

9%

What I read in newspapers or online news sites

5%

51%

32%

8%

2%

2%

What politicians say

1%

12%

39%

43%

3%

2%

What I see online on blogs and social media

2%

20%

39%

22%

5%

11%

What I hear from friends and family

10%

53%

26%

6%

5%

1%

What I hear in my workplace

3%

37%

34%

10%

4%

11%

What I learn from my own research

35%

50%

6%

2%

2%

4%

 

 

Total

lot/some of trust

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

What I see on TV news and current affairs

55%

54%

59%

40%

What I hear on radio news and current affairs

56%

53%

61%

34%

What I hear on radio talkback

40%

34%

46%

26%

What I read in newspapers or online news sites

56%

59%

58%

48%

What politicians say

13%

21%

8%

14%

What I see online on blogs and social media

22%

23%

23%

24%

What I hear from friends and family

63%

58%

66%

63%

What I hear in my workplace

40%

39%

43%

42%

What I learn from my own research

85%

86%

86%

83%

85% have a lot or some trust in what they learn from their own research, 63% in what they hear from friends and family, 56% in newspapers and radio and 55% in TV news and current affairs. Only 13% have a lot or some trust in what they hear from politicians and 22% have a lot/some trust in blogs and social media.

Labor voters tend to have a little more trust in newspapers while Liberal/National voters have a little more trust in radio and TV news and current affairs. Liberal/National voters also have above-average trust in radio talkback.

Frequency of Checking Emails and Social Media

Aug 13, 2012

Q. How often do you check any of the following technologies?

 

At least once every 15 minutes

At least once an hour

Every few hours

At least once a day

Less often

Don’t know

Don’t use

Text messages

7%

16%

28%

27%

13%

2%

7%

Mobile phone calls

7%

16%

28%

28%

14%

2%

5%

Social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter)

3%

10%

16%

27%

21%

*

23%

Personal e-mail

6%

13%

29%

45%

6%

*

1%

Work email

12%

14%

15%

14%

5%

*

39%

Voice mail

3%

5%

9%

15%

29%

2%

38%

 

 

Total at least once every 15 minutes

Aged 18-24

Aged 25-34

Text messages

7%

19%

11%

Mobile phone calls

7%

13%

10%

Social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter)

3%

9%

7%

Personal e-mail

6%

10%

12%

Work email

12%

11%

22%

Voice mail

3%

1%

7%

 

 

Total at least once an hour

Aged 18-24

Aged 25-34

Text messages

23%

59%

33%

Mobile phone calls

23%

46%

34%

Social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter)

13%

42%

24%

Personal e-mail

19%

33%

29%

Work email

26%

30%

42%

Voice mail

8%

10%

13%

12% say they check work emails ever 15 minutes and 26% check them at least once an hour. 23% check text messages and mobile phone calls at least once an hour.

Respondents aged under 35 were by far the most frequent users of mobile phones and social media.

19% of those aged 18-24 check their text messages and 13% check their mobile phone calls at least once every 15 minutes.

22% of those aged 25-34 check their work emails at least every 15 minutes.

At least every hour, 59% of those aged 18-24 check their text messages, 46% check their mobile phone calls and 42% check social media.

Anxiety about Checking Emails and Social Media

Aug 13, 2012

Q. If you can’t check the following every 15 minutes do you get anxious?

 

Total

Aged

18-24

Aged

25-34

Text messages

9%

18%

15%

Mobile phone calls

8%

11%

16%

Social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter)

6%

8%

13%

Personal e-mail

7%

6%

15%

Work email

8%

6%

14%

Voice mail

4%

11%

9% say they get anxious if they can’t check their text messages every 15 minutes and 8% get anxious about mobile phone calls and work emails.

18% of those aged 18-24 get anxious about checking text messages every 15 minutes but are less concerned about social media and emails.

More than one in ten people aged 25-34 get anxious about checking each media every 15 minutes – especially mobile phone calls (16%), text messages (15%) and personal emails (15%).

Surveillance and Intelligence-gathering

Jul 23, 2012

Q. The Government has recently proposed a number of amendments to the laws governing surveillance and intelligence-gathering. Do you support or oppose the following suggestions?

 

Total support

Total oppose

Strongly support

Support

Oppose

Strongly oppose

Don’t know

Extend the power of government agencies to intercept communications from major to lesser offences

40%

37%

9%

31%

21%

16%

24%

Enable government agencies to intercept messages on social media sites like Twitter and Facebook

40%

46%

10%

30%

26%

20%

14%

Require internet service providers to keep a record of every customers’ internet usage for 2 years

28%

57%

7%

21%

26%

31%

14%

Making it an offence not to assist government agencies with decryption e.g. reveal your password

26%

60%

8%

18%

28%

32%

15%

Allowing ASIO agents to plant or destroy material on computers if they have a warrant

27%

52%

7%

20%

23%

29%

20%

A majority of respondents were opposed to making it an offence not to assist government agencies with decryption e.g. reveal your password (60%), requiring internet service providers to keep a record of every customers’ internet usage for 2 years (57%) and allowing ASIO agents to plant or destroy material on computers if they have a warrant (52%).

They were more evenly divided over enabling government agencies to intercept messages on social media sites like Twitter and Facebook (40% support/46% oppose) and extending the power of government agencies to intercept communications from major to lesser offences (40% support/37% oppose).

Pages:12»

Sign up for updates

Receive the Essential Report in your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.