Benefit of UN Security Council seat

Oct 29, 2012

Q. Last week Australia won a non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council. Permanent seats on the UN Security Council are held by major powers such as the US, Russia and China while non-permanent seats are held by other countries for a two year period. How much of a benefit, if any, do you think there is for Australia in having a seat on the UN Security Council?

 

Total

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Total a lot/some benefit

45%

67%

33%

61%

Total little/no benefit

36%

16%

55%

22%

A lot of benefit

14%

27%

7%

17%

Some benefit

31%

40%

26%

44%

Little benefit

20%

13%

29%

16%

No benefit

16%

3%

26%

6%

Don’t know

18%

17%

13%

17%

45% think there is a lot or some benefit in Australia having a seat on the UN Security Council and 36% think there is little or no benefit.

67% of Labor voters and 61% of Greens voters think there is a lot/some benefit but 55% of Liberal/National voters think there is little/no benefit.

Younger respondents were a little more likely to see a benefit for Australia – 50% of respondents aged 18-35 think there is a lot/some benefit compared to 40% of those aged 55+.

UN Security Council

Oct 2, 2012

Q. The Australian Government is currently seeking to gain a non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council. Permanent seats on the UN Security Council are held by major powers such as the US, Russia and China while non-permanent seats are held by other countries including Croatia, Indonesia and South Africa. 

Do you think there is a benefit for Australia in having a seat on the UN Security Council or is there no benefit?

 

29 Sept 2008

This week

Vote Labor

Vote Lib/Nat

Vote Greens

Is a benefit

66%

44%

60%

32%

68%

No benefit

14%

24%

9%

39%

7%

Don’t know

20%

32%

31%

29%

25%

Forty four per cent (44%) of respondents believe that having a seat on the UN Security Council would be a benefit for Australia, whilst 24% believe it will be of no benefit.

Since the last time the question was polled four years ago in September 2008, the portion of those that believe a seat on the UN Security Council is a benefit has dropped 22 points from 66% to 44%.  The portion of those that don’t know also increased significantly in that time from 20% in September 2008 to 32% in this week’s results.

Greens voters are the most likely to believe that having a Security Council seat is a benefit (68%) followed by Labor voters (60%).

Coalition voters are the most likely to believe that it will be of no benefit (39%).